Academics

Fall 2015 Class Assignments

Class assignments are listed alphabetically by course name. All will be posted as received. If you do not see the assignments you are looking for, check TWEN, your professor's personal homepage or return to this web page to check again later.

You will receive your password for TWEN at orientation on August 21st.

Courses

Administrative Law A (ADMN-300-A)

Professor Kirkwood

First Assignment

Textbook: Ronald A. Cass, Colin S. Diver, Jack M. Beermann, and Jody Freeman, Administrative Law: Cases and Materials (6th ed. 2011)

As background for the introductory lecture, please read pages 1-15 of the casebook.

Administrative Law A (ADMN-300-A)

Professor Spade

First Assignment

August 24:

Casebook 1-49 (Overview of Administrative Law Practice)

August 26:

Gabriel J. Chin, “Regulating Race: Asian Exclusion and the Administrative State," 37 Harv. C.R.-C.L. L. Rev. 1 (2002) Sections I, II, III required, the rest optional.

Comprehensive Pre Trial Advocacy A (ADVC-300-A)

Professor Frost and Professor Penner

First Assignment

Aug. 24: Welcome, Course Overview and Orientation and Case Theory You will be assigned to either Group A or B for the purpose of later Assignments

Aug 26: Case Theory and Review of Case File: Discussion
Pretrial Advocacy - Introduction pages xli - xlvi, 561-567; and an initial review of the Case Files located on the CD in the back of the Pretrial Advocacy book.

Comprehensive Pre Trial Advocacy B (ADVC-300-B)

Professor Grant

First Class Assignment

CLASS DATE TOPIC READING
Tues 08/25 Introduction to the Course/
Role of the Advocate
Chapter 1, pp. 3-15;
RPC Titles 1-4

Antitrust Law A (ANTI-300-A)

Professor Kirkwood

First Assignment

Textbook: C. Paul Rogers III, Stephen Calkins, Mark R. Patterson & William R. Andersen, Antitrust Law: Policy and Practice (4th ed. 2008).

As background for the introductory lecture (likely to last two classes), please read pages 1-36 of the casebook and Appendix B.

Business Entities A (BUSN-300-A)

Professor Powell

  • Register for this course on WestLaw’s TWEN when you receive your WL password.
  • Textbook: Business Entities: Cases and Materials (3rd Ed.) by Professor Eric Chiappinelli.
  • Read Chapters 1 and 2 in Chiappinelli's textbook.

Business Entities E (BUSN-300-E)

Professor Chinen


Reading assignments for the course have been posted to the course TWEN site in the Assignments Folder.

Civil Procedure A (CIVL-100-A)

Prof. Shapiro

First Assignment

Before the class: In the near future there will be a TWEN site for the class. You should sign up for it and then go there and check it out. You might want to check back from time to time as I will be posting documents there gradually. I use the TWEN site extensively during the semester so you should make it a habit to check there.

Class 1. For Wednesday, August 26

For the first class: First look over the introductory section of the casebook labeled “Study Guide.” (This begins on page xxxv.) This is purely introductory. You should also review pages 17-24 of the Learning Civil Procedure (“LCP”) Comprehensive Study Guide (You will find the Comprehensive Study Guide on TWEN. It has its own button in the left-hand column. You may wish to download a copy.)

The bulk of the class will be devoted to a discussion of the following readings:

Walker arises from the same events that lead King to write The Letter. These are, in a sense, different ways of looking at the same thing. We will use these readings to expose some of the central issues in law and in civil procedure.

I will post additional discussion questions for you to consider as you read these cases closer to the time we begin class. Look for a revised assignment sheet on the TWEN page in mid-August.

Class 2. For Friday, August 28

First read 32-34 in the LCP Study Guide, then read 1-22 and 32-37 in the book. (Pages 32-37 may turn out to be for Class 3. I will determine this after Class 1. )

Civil Procedure B (CIVL-100-B)

Professor Coleman

First Assignment

The material for this course consists of Stempel, Baicker-McKee, Coleman, Herr, & Kaufman, Learning Civil Procedure (2d. Edition, West 2015).

For our first class meeting on Wednesday, August 26, please read Learning Civil Procedure pp. xxxv-xl; Comprehensive Study Guide pp. 1-3, 11-15, and 32-34 (posted on TWEN); and Walker v. City of Birmingham (posted on TWEN).

A TWEN site for this course has been established, and you should register for it using your Westlaw password. I have posted the syllabus for this class, and you should read it before attending the first day.

Please also note that due to a law school event, our second class meeting on Friday, August 28, has been moved from 12:30 – 2:20 p.m. to 10:00 – 11:50 am in Room C1.

Civil Procedure AB (CIVL-100-AB)

Prof. Shapiro

First Assignment

Before the class: In the near future there will be a TWEN site for the class. You should sign up for it and then go there and check it out. You might want to check back from time to time as I will be posting documents there gradually. I use the TWEN site extensively during the semester so you should make it a habit to check there.

Class 1. For Tuesday, August 25

For the first class: First look over the introductory section of the casebook labeled “Study Guide.” (This begins on page xxxv.) This is purely introductory. You should also review pages 17-24 of the Learning Civil Procedure (“LCP”) Comprehensive Study Guide (You will find the Comprehensive Study Guide on TWEN. It has its own button in the left-hand column. You may wish to download a copy.)

The bulk of the class will be devoted to a discussion of the following readings:

Walker arises from the same events that lead King to write The Letter. These are, in a sense, different ways of looking at the same thing. We will use these readings to expose some of the central issues in law and in civil procedure.

I will post additional discussion questions for you to consider as you read these cases closer to the time we begin class. Look for a revised assignment sheet on the TWEN page in mid-August.

Civil Procedure 325 A (CIVL-325-A)

Professor Coleman

First Assignment

The material for this course is a “Civil Procedure II Reader” that is available for purchase in the bookstore.

For our first class meeting on Wednesday, August 26, please read 28 U.S.C. § 1291, § 1292; FRCP 54(b); FRAP 1-6;In re WorldCom, Inc., 708 F.3d 327; Rembrandt Social Media, L.P. v. Facebook, Inc., 2014 WL 1344460 (Fed. Cir. April 7, 2014); Mohawk Industries, Inc. v. Carpenter, 558 U.S. 100 (2009). (These are all included in the Reader.)

A TWEN site for this course has been established, and you should register for it using your Westlaw password. I have posted the syllabus for this class. You should read it before attending the first day.

Constitutional Law A (CNLW-200-A)

Professor Siegel

Fall 2015
First Assignment

Dear Con Law Students:

Here are your assignments for the first two classes. Please note that, as the bookstore has not yet received the reader for the class (Garvey, Alenikoff, and Farber, Modern Constitutional Theory: A Reader (5th ed. 2004)), I have provided a link to one of the readings for the first class and promised a similar link for class #2 if necessary.

Class #1: An Introduction to the Constitution and Constitutional Argument

  • Casebook pp. xxv-lvii (the Constitution)
  • Reader—pp. 4-12 (Bobbit) or read this version available on the web: Reader
  • Casebook pp. 11-34


Class #2: Judicial Review (and Judicial Supremacy)

  • casebook pp.1-10 (Marbury and related materials)
  • reader pp. 244-265 (or read alternative materials to be posted to TWEN)

Constitutional Law E (CNLW-200-E)

Professor McKay

Fall 2015

First Assignment

Welcome to Constitutional Law. All Cases and page numbers are found in the course text, Constitutional Law (4th Ed.), Chemerinsky.

Aug. 25

Marbury v. Madison, and

Martin v. Hunter's Lessee (Judicial Review) pp. 1-11

District of Columbia v. Heller (Limits on Federal Judicial Authority) pp. 11-34

NOTE: Reading Assignments include at your option the essay materials within the assigned pages. Cases are mandatory reading.

Aug. 27

District of Columbia v. Heller (Limits on Fed. Judicial Authority) pp. 11-34

U.S. v. Klein (Separation of Powers as limit), pp. 38-41

U.S. v. Plaut (Advisory Opinions), pp. 42-45

Contracts A (CONT-100-A)

Professor DeLong

Fall 2015

First Assignment:
Please purchase CONTRACTS RESTATEMENT 2D CONTRACTS AND US UCC ARTICLE 2 by James E. Byrne 5th Edition as well as An Introduction to Contracts: The Law of Transactions which consists of two booklets, the Coursebook and the Handout to the Coursebook for sale in the bookstore. Register for this Course on TWEN when you receive your WestLaw Password. Complete your first assignment for class, here

Contracts B (CONT-100-B)

Professor Chinen

FALL 2015

First Assignment Week of August 24

Register for this course on WestLaw’s TWEN when you receive your WestLaw password.

Monday: Skim Barnett, CONTRACTS: CASES AND DOCTRINE 15-21; read 22-45

Wednesday: Review 22-45; read 59-68

Contracts E (CONT-100-E)

Professor Mahmud

Fall 2015

First Assignment

The textbook for this course is "Contracts, A Contemporary Approach", 2d Ed, by Kunz & Chomsky.

For our first meeting on Monday, Aug. 24, please read pp. 1-13.

Criminal Law A & B (CRIM-100-A&B)

Professor Roberts

First Assignment

For Monday August 24:

Please read the following pages from our textbook: Kadish, Schulhofer, Steiker, & Barlow, Criminal Law & Its Processes: Cases & Materials (9th ed. 2012):
Pp. 1 – 12 (stop at end of Part B); p.13; pp. 31-33 (stop before NOTES); p. 34 (note 4.) – 41 (stop before “Notes and Questions”)

Please read this assignment, and all future assignments, in a way that actively engages with the material. Do your best to puzzle through anything that is unclear; and bring to class your questions about anything that remains unclear.

Please also come ready to discuss your thoughts on the following questions:
What legal rule does the Court establish in Winship (p. 31)? What about in Patterson (p. 37)? What legal rule would the dissenting Justices in Patterson prefer?

For Weds August 26:

Please read the casebook pages 75 – 100 (stop before “Cousins of Retribution”). Make sure that you address the following questions:

  1. Brief Regina v. Dudley and Stephens (p.83) (we will discuss briefing a case on Monday), and bring a hard copy of your brief into class.
  2. Take a look at the casebook at p. 90 – “For mentally disturbed offenders, or offenders driven to commit predatory crime because of addiction or economic need, a focus on moral blame . . . might suggest reducing the severity of punishment, while concern for deterrence might suggest increasing it.” What do you understand the reasoning to be here? Do you agree?
  3. Which of the commentators on retribution (pp. 93 - 98) do you find most convincing, and why?

For Monday August 31:

Please read the following pages: 106 (beginning at “Transitional Note”)-107; 115-19; 205-16 (stop before “Note on Culpable Thoughts”). (Note that you will find references in this reading to provisions of the Model Penal Code ("MPC"), which is included at the back of your book. For this assignment, there is no need to focus on these references or consult the MPC. I will explain more in class.)

In preparation for class:

  1. Please make sure you that you are able to give a brief summary of each of the following punishment theories:
    • deterrence
    • rehabilitation
    • incapacitation
    • retribution
  2. For each of these theories, please make sure that you are able to summarize one or two of the most persuasive critiques/ objections.

For Weds Sept 4:

Please read pp. 218-32 (stop before note 4); 235 (“Note on Possession”) – 238.

Please brief:

  1. Jones (p. 218)
  2. Pope (p. 219)
  3. Barber (p. 236)

being sure to flag in your Notes/Reactions sections any parts of the judges' reasoning that seem vulnerable to critique.

No need to bring a hard copy, but be sure to have your briefs with you in some form in class so that you can discuss what you came up with.
** Note that again in this assignment you can disregard references to the Model Penal Code (MPC)**

Environmental Law Fundamentals (ENVL-300)

Professor Gonzalez

Fall 2015

Required Texts:

  1. Percival, Schroeder, Miller and Leape, Environmental Regulation: Law, Science and Policy (7th ed. 2013).
  2. West’s Selected Environmental Law Statutes (2015-16). You can also use earlier versions of the statute book. NOTE: Please obtain a copy of this book by the first week of class. You will need the book to complete a required writing assignment. Reading the statutes on-line will is not recommended due to the numerous cross-references.

First assignment:
Text: 1-30. Excerpt from Papal Encyclical, Laudato Si’ (available on TWEN). Please write down the different reasons one might protect the environment. How does the excerpt from the Papal Encyclical differ from the other readings? Please be prepared to discuss the mercury contamination problem.

Advanced Environmental and Indian Law:
Restoring the Elwha River (ENVL-362-A)

Professors Eberhard & P'Neill

First Assignment
Fall 2015

Course Materials

The required texts for this course are (1) Jeff Crane, Finding the River: An Environmental History of the Elwha (Oregon State University Press, 2011); ["Crane"]; (2) Lynda V. Mapes, Elwha: A River Reborn (The Seattle Times and The Mountaineers, 2013) [“Mapes”]; (3) statutory, regulatory and other sources, available via the TWEN site for the course; [“TWEN”]; and (4) legislative history for the Elwha River Ecosystem and Fisheries Restoration Act of 1992, available on CD through the SU Bookstore [“LH”].

Although it is not specifically assigned for any class, Lynda V. Mapes, Breaking Ground: The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and the Unearthing of Tse-whit-zen Village (University of Washington Press, 2015), is required reading because it provides significant historical and cultural context for understanding the Tribe’s 100 year effort to bring about the removal of the dams. The book should be read in its entirety during the first four weeks of class.

Reading Assignment – First Class Meeting (August 25, 2015)

The first class will provide an introduction to the course. For this class, please read the following:

1. Introduction, “Find the River” Crane, 1-4
Chapter 1, “Strong River, Strong People” Crane, 5-36
2. Testimony Before Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee,
Carla Elofson, Tribal Chairperson (with Bea Charles) TWEN
3. Elwha River Ecosystem and Fisheries Restoration Act of 1992 TWEN
4. Timeline Mapes, 116-17
5. Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, “Elwha River Restoration:
Effect on the People” TWEN

Employment Discrimination A (EMPL-315-A)

Professor Martin

Fall 2015

First Assignment

Hello. I look forward to meeting you all soon.

During the first week, we will have an Introduction to the course material.

I will post on TWEN a few short articles (2-10 pages each) that you should read by the end of the first week of class. The articles will be posted in the “Reference Materials” folder. The TWEN site will be available on Monday.

Thank you—Professor Martin

Nonprofit Organizations, Trust Law, and Philanthropy (ESTA-320-A)

Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs John K. Eason

Fall 2015

Course Materials:

  • Text: Nonprofit Organizations, Cases and Materials, by Fishman & Schwarz (5th ed. 2015).
  • Please register for the TWEN site that has been created for this course. There is not much on the site at the moment, but I plan to post more next Monday and will email you via the TWEN site when I do.

For Our First Class:

  1. Please read and be prepared to discuss Ch. 1 and the problems at the end of the chapter (pp. 3-39).
  2. Think about a nonprofit organization that you (i) respect; and one that you (ii) disrespect. Also, consider this question: if you were going to create a nonprofit organization, what would be its/your purpose, and why? Come to class prepared to discuss your choices and reasons.
  3. Skim this webpage: https://www.harborcompliance.com/information/how-to-start-a-non-profit-organization-in-washington
  4. For all assignments, you should read, contemplate, and be prepared to discuss any “Problems” appearing in the assigned materials. (e.g., for asst. #1, there is a Problem on p. 39).

Also Think About: Would you prefer a final exam, or in lieu of an exam, a short paper (5-10 pages) and a presentation to the class? Pages and times are approximate, but whatever the final decision, the burden will be no greater than suggested by the 2 credits you will receive for this course.

  • Office Hours: Drop by anytime, and by appt.
  • Office Location: 2nd Floor, #210-I
  • Class Meetings: Thursdays, 2:00pm – 3:50pm
  • Class Location: Room C7
  • Office Phone: (206) 398-4163
  • e-mail: easonj@seattleu.edu
  • Course Assistant: Laurie Wells ljsleep@seattleu.edu (206) 398-4078
  • Deanship Assistant: Deann Ketchum, ketchumd@seattleu.edu (206) 398-4302

Trusts and Estates (ESTA-300)

Professor Minneti

Fall 2015

First Assignment

Monday August 24th

  • Review Syllabus (posted on TWEN in Syllabus folder)
  • Complete and submit Class Survey by 9 am on Monday August 24
  • Read casebook (CB) Chapter 1
  • Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 11.02.005
  • Review Client File 1: Amy and Justin (found on TWEN in Course Materials, Week 1)

Wednesday August 26

Read CB Chapter 2: 49-87
Read RCW: 11.04.035
11.04.081
11.04.085
11.04.095

Rebuilding Tribal Nations:
Legal, Economic and Social Changes (INDL-355-A)

Professor Silverman

Fall 2015

First Assignment

Please read pages the Forward, Editor’s Introduction and pages 1-54 in Rebuilding Tribal Nations, Strategies for Governance and Development. Read also the Preface and Introduction in The State of Native Nations. Both books are available in the SU Bookstore.

Public International Law A (INTL-300-A)

Professor Mahmud

Fall 2015

First Assignment

For our first meeting on Monday, Aug. 24, please read pp. 1-34 from the textbook, "International Law and World Order", 4th Ed, by Weston, et. al.

Trademark Law E (INTP-315-E)

Professor Cumbow

Required Materials

  • Ginsburg, et al. Trademark and Unfair Competition Law - Fifth Edition
  • Supplement, posted on Course Site
  • Additional Materials listed in Syllabus and posted on/linked to from Course Site

Please make certain that you have the 5th Edition of the Casebook.

First Class Assignment

The class meets for the first time on Monday evening, August 24, in Room 327, from 7.30 to 9.20pm. Please come to class having read the following:

  • Text
    • 25-29: Borchard, “A Trademark Is Not a Patent or a Copyright ...”
    • 59-62: Kellogg v. Nabisco
    • 530-36: Dastar Corp. V. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp.(and see correction to p. 535 in your Supplement at p. 65)
  • Additional*:
    • “Five Common Misconceptions Regarding Trademark Protection”

* “Additional” Readings are arranged by class date on the “Course Materials” page on the Course Site.

Note

I recommend that students taking an intellectual property focus supplement this course by also taking the 1-hour Trademark Lab (INTP-316-E) taught by Professor Chad Smith. The lab focuses on the basics of trademark practice, including trademark selection and clearance, filing and prosecuting trademark applications in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, ex parte and inter partes practice before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, and maintaining and enforcing a domestic and international portfolio of trademark registrations.

Internet and Cyberspace Law (INTP-330-E)

Professor Tapia

First Assignment

For the first week’s classes, please read Chapter I of the required text: the Reno and Noah cases (pages 1-28) and the Geolocation article (pages 29-38). Next week’s reading will be announced at the end of each Wednesday’s session. Also, please register on TWEN if you have not already done so. The syllabus is posted on TWEN.

Latinos and the Law A (JURS-380-A)

Professor Bender

Tuesday August 25

  • Overview of Latina/o Stereotypes and Mistreatment of Latina/os in U.S. Law Greasers and Gringos
  • Read preface and pages 1-29 Hernandez v. Texas, 347 U.S. 475 (1954)

Advanced Legal Research A(LRES-350-A)

Professors Fitz-Gerald and Swatt-Engstrom

  • This course does not use TWEN, but instead uses the Blackboard platform via LexisNexis Web Courses available from the LexisNexis for Law School page. The Blackboard site will be made available during the week of August 17th.
  • On the site you will find readings plus an online homework assignment that must be completed and submitted prior to the start of the first day’s class.

Poverty Law A (POVL-300-A)

Professor Spade

First Assignment
Week 1

(August 24, 26):

Paul Kivel, “Social Service or Social Change?” in The Revolution Will Not Be Funded (ed. INCITE!).

Joan Olsson, “Detour-Spotting for White Anti-Racists.” (pdf on TWEN)

Conor Friedersdorf, “Ferguson’s Conspiracy Against Black Citizens: How the city's leadership harassed and brutalized their way to multiple civil-rights violations,” The Atlantic, March 5, 2015. Available at: http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2015/03/ferguson-as-a-criminal-conspiracy-against-its-black-residents-michael-brown-department-of-justice-report/386887/

Optional:
Cheryl Harris, “Whiteness as Property,” in Critical Race Studies: The Key Writings that Formed the Movement, (eds. Crenshaw et al.) (1996) (pdf on TWEN).
Andrea Smith, “Heteropatriarchy and the Three Pillars of White Supremacy: Rethinking Women of Color Organizing,” in Color of Violence (ed. Incite!) (2006).

Professional Responsibility A (PROF-200-A)

Professor Martin

Fall 2015

First Assignment – For Week One – August 24 and August 26

Monday, August 24:

  1. READ Deborah L. Rhode, The Profession and Its Discontents, 61 Ohio St. L.J. 1335 (2000) and Personal Satisfaction in Professional Practice, 58 Syracuse L.Rev. 217 (2008). Also read/skim Patrick J. Schiltz, On Being a Happy, Healthy, and Ethical Member of an Unhappy, Unhealthy, and Unethical Profession, 52 Vand L. Rev. 871 (1999). (You can find the articles on Westlaw or Lexis). If you have the course text, begin reading f pages 1-42 (top).
    Additionally, Read the attached excerpt, In re Pautler (5 pages) and be prepared to discuss. Consider the following:

    • Try and put yourself in Mark Pautler’s position. Why do you suppose he acted the way he did?
    • Discipline of attorneys for misconduct is one of several formal mechanisms for regulating lawyer conduct. The conduct of lawyers, however, is often governed more by informal mechanisms, such as the culture of the institutions where lawyers work (law firms, corporations, or government agencies, for example). Did you learn anything from Pautler about informal methods of regulation?

  2. Read/skim the text of the Rules of Professional Conduct during this first week of class. If you have received the course text bundle (which includes the rules supplement) you can find the text of the rules at: http://www.americanbar.org/groups/professional_responsibility/publications/model_rules_of_professional_conduct/model_rules_of_professional_conduct_table_of_contents.html

    Note:
    It is not necessary to memorize the rules or dig deeply into the comments at this point. I merely want you to familiarize yourself with the essence of the rules of professional conduct that govern the legal profession.


Looking Ahead: A copy of the film, To Kill a Mockingbird, is on reserve under my name in the library. Please view the film or re-familiarize yourself with the story of Atticus Finch over the course of the first two weeks of class. If you have a chance to review it before that that will be great as we will discuss it and refer to it during the first weeks of class. You may check it out and view it at your convenience or review it via various online sources at your leisure. You may have read the book or seen the film before. However, please re-familiarize yourselves with the story of Atticus Finch in preparation for the discussion during the second week of class. The story will provide a framework for discussion of several professional responsibility issues over the course of the semester, significantly, the lawyer’s role in society and the development of a philosophy of lawyering. Interestingly, July 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of Harper Lee’s novel “To Kill a Mockingbird,” with Harper Lee’s presumed original version “Go Set a Watchman” released this summer.

NOTE: Wednesday’s reading assignment will be announced on Monday.

I look forward to meeting you soon!

Professional Responsibity E (PROF-200-E)

Professor McDermott

First Assignment

August 24 - Introduction + Chapter 1 (pages 1-31)

Real Estate Transactions E (PROP-300-E)

Professor Bender

  • First Assignment
  • Class 1 Tuesday August 25
    • Introduction: The Nature of Modern Real Estate Transactions pages 1-13
  • Class 2 Thursday August 27
    • Overview of Lawyer’s Role in Real Estate Conveyancing and Broker Competition 17- 37; Douglas v. Visser, 295 P.3d 800 (Wash. App. 2013)

Remedies E (REMD-300-E)

Professor Gordon

First Assignment:

  • Please register on TWEN, Password is: RemediesSU2015.
  • Class 1: Monday, August 24, 2015: Introductory Lecture: "Justice in the Real World: God's Work on Earth Must Truly be Our Own." Focus: The Rightful Position Principle. Casebook 1-18 (Includes Introduction plus U.S. v. Hatahley).
  • Class 2: Wednesday, August 26, 2015: Value as the Measure of the Rightful Position. Casebook:18-35 [Trinity Church; In Re September 11th – Twin Towers Litigation]
  • Problem No. 1 due Class 3.

For All Future Assignments and Due Dates:
Check Assignment List at End of Syllabus

Individual Income Taxation (TAXL-300-A)

Professor Kahng


Assignment for first class, Monday, August 24

Required books

  1. Graetz & Schenk, Federal Income Taxation, Principles and Policies (7thth ed. 2013), ISBN 978-1-60930-183-5
    If you buy a used copy of this book, please make sure to purchase the 7th edition.
  2. Selected Federal Taxation Statutes & Regulations, 2015 ed., Lathrope editor, West, ISBN 978-1628100846
    If purchasing a used copy of this book, it is fine to buy an earlier version (e.g., 2013 or 2014) or the newest version (2015).

Course Syllabus

The syllabus is posted on TWEN under “Syllabus and Weekly Assignments”. The syllabus consists of separate units that contain problems, along with reading assignments from the casebook and specific provisions of the statute and regulations.

The specific assignment for each week will be posted as soon as practicable. Thus far, I have posted assignment for the first two weeks of class.

Reading Assignment

We’ll discuss Unit 1 during the first class. The specific reading assignment is as follows:

  • Read pages 1-12 and 27-39 of the casebook, and be prepared to discuss in class.
  •  
  • Skim pages 13-27, 49-81. This material provides an overview tax terminology and the tax system. We won’t specifically discuss it during our first class. I suggest you skim it now and re-read it more closely at the end of the semester.

Torts A (TORT-100-A)

Professor Siegel

Fall 2015 First Assignment

Class #1: Intro and the Elements of Battery—Read the introduction (xxxiii-lv) and pp.1-14

Egg Timer Exercise (write for 5 minutes MAXIMUM): Based on all your reading for the day, what purposes of torts are served by holding Putney liable for Vosburg’s injuries? What purposes would be better served by not holding him liable? In your mind, which side has the better of the argument?

Class #2: Defenses to Intentional Torts: Consent and Insanity: pp.14-32

Egg Timer Exercise (write for 5 minutes MAXIMUM): Please write a sample jury instruction explaining the boundaries of the consent defense to a claim of battery resulting from an injury suffered in a recreational sporting contest.

Torts B (TORT-100-B)

Professor Ainsworth

  • Text: Henderson, Pearson, and Kyser, The Torts Process (8th ed.)
  • In your textbook, read the Overview of the legal profession and the legal process p. 1-9: and The elements of battery: p. 9-19.
  • Read How to Prepare for Torts Class found on TWEN in Course Materials.

Torts E (TORT-100-E)

Professor Gonzalez

  • Register for this course on WestLaw’s TWEN when you receive your WL password.
  • Text: Henderson, Pearson & Kysar, The Torts Process (8th ed.)
  • Please read pages 1-30. Brief the assigned cases in accordance with the briefing format for this course.

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