Fall 2014 Class Assignments

Class assignments are listed alphabetically by course name. All will be posted as received. If you do not see the assignments you are looking for, check TWEN, your professor's personal homepage or return to this web page to check again later.

Advanced Electronic Legal Research and Methodology (LRES-350-A)

Professor Kerry Fitz-Gerald & Professor Barbara Swatt-Engstrom

  • We are using Blackboard, available through Lexis, as our course management system. Required readings and the assignment (due 15 minutes before the start of class) are available on the Blackboard site.
  • To access the online course, you need to:
    1. Login at lawschool.westlaw.com
    2. Click the Web Courses button or link (it may say “my web courses”)
    3. Click the Courses tab towards the top left
    4. Click the Seattle University folder in the lower right (under Course Catalog)
    5. Locate Advanced Electronic Legal Research 2014 and click Enroll
    6. Click OK to enter the course
  • Please contact either Kerry Fitz-Gerald or Barbara Swatt-Engstrom if you’re having trouble getting into the course.

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Antitrust Law (ANTI-300-A)

Professor Kirkwood

  • Text: C. Paul Rogers III, Stephen Calkins, Mark R. Patterson & William R. Andersen, Antitrust Law: Policy and Practice (4th ed. 2008).
  • Background reading for the first two classes: Pages 1 – 35 and Appendix B.

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Bankruptcy (BANK-300-A)

Professor Dick

  • Please read Chapter 1 of the textbook.

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Basic Real Estate (PROP-300-A)

Professor Weaver

  • Register for this course on TWEN.
  • Read through page 65 of the assigned text.

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Basic Real Estate E (PROP-300-E)

Professor Steven Bender

  • REGISTER for this class on Westlaw's TWEN.
  • Class 1: Monday August 25
    Introduction: The Nature of Modern Real Estate Transactions pages 1-13 and 2014 Market Update (document posted to TWEN site)
  • Class 2: Wednesday August 27
    Overview of Lawyer’s Role in Real Estate Conveyancing and Broker Competition 17- 37; Douglas v. Visser, 295 P.3d 800 (Wash. App. 2013)

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Business Entities (BUSN-300-A)

Professor Russell A. Powell

  • Register for this course on TWEN.
  • Read Chapters 1 and 2 in Chiappinelli's Business Entities: Cases and Materials.

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Civil Procedure I A (CIVL-100-A)

Professor Shapiro

  • Before the class: Over the course of the next week I will set up a TWEN site for the class. When you are able to do so, you should sign up for it and then go there and check it out. You might want to check back from time to time as I will be posting documents there gradually. (I use the TWEN site extensively during the semester so you can make it a habit to check there.)
  • Class 1. For Monday, August 25
    • First look over the intro section of the book labeled “Study Guide.” (This begins on page xxxix, if you like Roman numerals.) This is purely introductory.
    • The bulk of the class will be devoted to a discussion of the following readings:
      Walker vs. City of Birmingham (posted on the TWEN site under “Assignments”)
    • Dr. Martin Luther King’s Letter from the Birmingham Jail. There are also other sources and you are welcome to rely on them should you prefer to do so.
    • Pages 17-24 of the LCP Study Guide (You will find this on TWEN. It has its own button in the left-hand column.)
    • Walker arises from the same events that lead King to write The Letter. These are, in a sense, different ways of looking at the same thing. We will use these readings to expose some of the central issues in law and in civil procedure.
  • Class 2. For Wednesday, August 27
    • First read 32-34 in the LCP Study Guide, then read 1-22 and 31-37 in the book.

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Civil Procedure I B (CIVL-100-B)

Professor Coleman

  • The material for this course consists of Stempel, Baicker-McKee, Coleman, Herr, & Kaufman, Learning Civil Procedure (West 2013).
  • For our first class meeting on Tuesday, August 26, please read Learning Civil Procedure pp. xxxix-xlv; Comprehensive Study Guide pp. 1-3, 11-15, and 32-34 (posted on TWEN); and Walker v. City of Birmingham (posted on TWEN).
  • A TWEN site for this course has been established, and you should register for it using your Westlaw password. I have posted the syllabus for this class, and you should read it before attending the first day.

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Civil Procedure I C (CIVL-100-C)

Professor Shapiro

  • Before the class: Over the course of the next week I will set up a TWEN site for the class. When you are able to do so, you should sign up for it and then go there and check it out. You might want to check back from time to time as I will be posting documents there gradually. (I use the TWEN site extensively during the semester so you can make it a habit to check there.)
  • Class 1. For Tuesday, August 26
    • First look over the intro section of the book labeled “Study Guide.” (This begins on page xxxix, if you like Roman numerals.) This is purely introductory.
    • The bulk of the class will be devoted to a discussion of the following readings:
      Walker vs. City of Birmingham (posted on the TWEN site under “Assignments”)
    • Dr. Martin Luther King’s Letter from the Birmingham Jail. There are also other sources and you are welcome to rely on them should you prefer to do so.
    • Pages 17-24 of the LCP Study Guide (You will find this on TWEN. It has its own button in the left-hand column.)
    • Walker arises from the same events that lead King to write The Letter. These are, in a sense, different ways of looking at the same thing. We will use these readings to expose some of the central issues in law and in civil procedure.
  • Class 2. For Thursday, August 28
    • First read 32-34 in the LCP Study Guide, then read 1-22 and 31-37 in the book.

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Civil Procedure I E (CIVL-100-E)

Professor Chon

Week One (August 26 and 28)
An Introduction to American Courts; A Description of the Litigation Process;
The Evolution of Personal Jurisdiction
These first set of materials will give you an important overview of the US court system and the litigation process. Personal jurisdiction concerns itself with the court's power to bring persons and property into the forum, based upon the due process clause of the fourteenth amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

  • GPR-H Chapters 1 and 2: 3-35
  • GPR-H Chapter 6: 145-61
  • Syllabus: We will discuss this in class on Thursday.
  • Please bring print copy of the one page questionnaire to class on Thursday.
  • Reflective Essay
  • MPRC Preamble 1

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Civil Procedure II (CIVL-325-A)

Professor Coleman

  • The material for this course is a “Civil Procedure II Reader” that is available for purchase in the bookstore.
  • For our first class meeting on Tuesday, August 26, please read 28 U.S.C. § 1291, § 1292; FRCP 54(b); FRAP 1-6; In re WorldCom, Inc., 708 F.3d 327; Rembrandt Social Media, L.P. v. Facebook, Inc., 2014 WL 1344460 (Fed. Cir. April 7, 2014); Mohawk Industries, Inc. v. Carpenter, 558 U.S. 100 (2009). (These are all included in the Reader.)
  • A TWEN site for this course has been established, and you should register for it using your Westlaw password. I have posted the syllabus for this class. You should read it before attending the first day.

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Comparative Law: The Middle East (INTL-350-A)

Professor Russell A. Powell

  • Register for this course on TWEN.
  • Introduction: Early Islam. Reading to be prepared for class: Albert Hourani’s A History of the Arab Peoples, pp. 1-80. Note: This is a long assignment and will serve as background for the entire course.

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Constitutional Law I B (CNLW-200-B)

Professor David Skover

  • All information concerning the course, including the Syllabus, is available at "Skover Online"
  • For the first day of class, please familiarize yourself with the pages of the website associated with the course, and read the materials in Section I (Introduction), Assignment 1 (Text 1-13, 1307-1324).

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Constitutional Law I E (CNLW-200-E)

Professor Siegel

Welcome to Constitutional Law.

  • The main text for the class is the 4th edition of Erwin Chemerinsky’s Constitutional Law casebook (2013). In addition, you are required to purchase Garvey, Aleinikoff, and Farber’s Modern Constitutional Theory: A Reader (5th ed. 2004).
  • For the first week, the assignment is as follows:
    Class #1: An Introduction to the Constitution and Constitutional Argument --Casebook pp. xxv-lvii (the Constitution) --Reader—pp. 4-12 (Bobbit) --Casebook pp. 11-34 Class #2: Judicial Review (and Judicial Supremacy) --casebook pp.1-10 (Marbury and related materials) --reader pp. 244-265
  • I have created a TWEN site for the course and posted a copy of the syllabus there; I encourage you to sign up for the site as soon as possible.

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Contracts (CONT-100-E)

Professor DeLong

  • Register for this class on TWEN and read all Introductory Course material prior to the Unit 1 assignment in the Workbook
  • Do Unit 1: Pacta Sunt Servanda and The Folk-Lore of Promises and Contracts
  • Read: Wood v Boynton and Embola v Tuppela and prepare answers to the questions after the cases. Also read RESTATEMENT (SECOND) OF CONTRACTS §§ 1 and 2 in the Rules Pamphlet.

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Criminal Law (CRIM-100-A)

Professor Boerner

  • Please read pages 205-207 of the Kadish, etc. casebook and pages 29 and 30 of the Section A Supplemental Materials found on the TWEN page. We will not go past these materials on the first day.
  • If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with my assistant, Lori Lamb.

I look forward to meeting you.
Professor Boerner

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Employment Discrimination (EMPL-315-A)

Professor Martin

Hello. I look forward to meeting you all soon.
During the first week, we will have an Introduction to the course material.
I will post on TWEN a few short articles (2-10 pages each) that you should read by the end of the first week of class. The articles will be posted under the “Reference Materials” link.
Thank you, Professor Martin

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Environmental Law Fundamentals (ENVL-300-A)

Professor Gonzalez

  • Register for this course on TWEN.
  • Required Texts:
    1. Percival, Schroeder, Miller and Leape, Environmental Regulation: Law, Science and Policy (7th ed. 2013).
    2. West’s Selected Environmental Law Statutes (2014-15). You can also use earlier versions of the statute book.
  • First assignment:
    Text: 1-49. Please be prepared to discuss the mercury contamination problem.

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Evidence (EVID-200-A)

Professor Russo

  • August 26th, Class 1: Introduction and The Basics
    • Learning Evidence: Chapters 1-5
    • FRE's: 101, 103, 105 and 1101
    • Real life exercise: Establishing relevant facts regarding this class by way of student questions, thereby avoiding boring lecture by professor.
    • Please register on TWEN for this class.

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Federal Indian Law (INDL-300-A)

Professor Michael Mirande

  • Text: C. Goldberg, R. Tsosie, K. Washburn, & E.R. Washburn, American Indian Law: Native Nations and the Federal System (6th ed. LexisNexis 2010) (“Goldberg”) is the required casebook. Either the loose leaf or the hardback version will work fine. There should be used versions of this edition available.
  • Here is the reading for the first two classes:
    • 5 Aug.: Fundamentals: Course overview, syllabus review, you and your initial questions. Then we turn to the history of federal Indian policy and start the “Marshall Trilogy,” the three foundational cases of federal Indian law. These cases are Indian law’s essential building blocks and will be a constant in our discussions throughout the semester. The readings: U.S. Const. Art. I, sec. 2, cl. 3; U.S. Const. Art. I, sec. 8, cl. 3; U.S. Const. 14th Amendment, sec. 2; 8 USC 1401(b) (Indian Citizenship Act of 1924); Goldberg at 13-42, 44-49.
    • 27 Aug.: Fundamentals: We complete the “Marshall Trilogy” and then take a glimpse at the evolution of the law. That evolution -- the law’s trajectory -- is at the center of this course: Goldberg at 53-58, 61-76, 725-726 (starting with the first full paragraph on 725 through the top lines on 726) (an excerpt from New Mexico v. Mescalero Apache Tribe, 462 U.S. 324 (1983)).

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Federal Courts A (CIVL-305-A)

Professor David Skover

  • All information concerning the course, including the Syllabus, is available in “Skover Online
  • For the first day of class, please familiarize yourself with the pages of the website associated with the course, and read the materials in Section I (Introduction), Assignment 1 (Pushaw article).

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Gift and Estate Tax (TAXL-310-E)

Professor Marten

  • Please register on TWEN for access to a text supplement.
  • In advance of each class, read and think about the pages of the text which were assigned at the previous class, and the applicable section(s) of the Code, and Regulations.
  • For the first two (2) classes, read pages 1-43 and pages 44-83, respectively.
    In addition, there will be discussion problems, which you will analyze in the classroom environment. You may be called upon at any time.

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Health Law I (HLTH-305-E)

Professor Burgon

  • Assignment for the first week of classes:
    • Read Health Law: Cases, Materials and Problems, pages 1-15
    • Watch Frontline: Sick Around the World (PBS, 2008)
  • Optional supplemental reading for additional background information:
    • Understanding Health Policy, chapters 1 and 14 and/or
    • Health Care Regulation in America, Chapter 1
    • Casebook for the course is Barry R. Furrow et. al., Health Law: Cases, Materials and Problems (7th ed. 2013)
  • Optional materials for those who want to read more about the first unit of the course dealing with the history of health policy, international health models, and the structure of the US health care industry are:
    • Robert I. Field, Health Care Regulation in America: Complexity, Confrontation, and Compromise (Oxford University Press, 2007) [a somewhat dated book but is an easy read that describes the history and development of the US health care system] and/or
    • Thomas Bodenheimer, MD and Kevin Grumbach, MD, Understanding Health Policy: A Clinical Approach (6th ed. 2012) [a more current and in-depth description of the health care industry written primarily for health care executives so it has good detail for understanding the system but much of it will not be directly relevant to our discussions in this course]

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International Criminal Law (CRIM-380-A)

Professor Ronald C. Slye

Reading Assignment for Week of August 25

  • Monday, August 25
    • Chapter 1
      Chapter 1 introduces some of the larger themes that we will be exploring in the course. They raise questions not only about international criminal law, but criminal law in general. Focus on the readings from Chapter 2. While we will briefly discuss the issues raised in Chapter 1, we will focus on the creation of the institutions that administer international criminal law.
    • Discussion questions:
      • What is the difference between restorative justice and retributive justice? Which do you prefer and why?
      • Are truth commissions and similar mechanisms legitimate approaches to mass atrocities, or are they mechanisms for providing lesser accountability for the wrongs of powerful people?
  • Wednesday, August 27
    • Chapter 2 – up to Note 14 titled “Universal Jurisdiction in Spain”
      We will discuss the application of international criminal law by domestic courts, focusing on universal jurisdiction.
    • Discussion questions:
      • When can a state assert jurisdiction over a crime?
      • How do we justify asserting jurisdiction over crimes that occur outside of the territory of a state? Are those justifications compelling?
      • What is the definition of universal jurisdiction? Do states have a right to assert universal jurisdiction as a matter of customary international law? A duty? What crimes are, or should be, subject to universal jurisdiction.

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Individual Income Taxation (TAXL-310-A & E)

Professor Kahng

  • Required books
    • (1) Graetz & Schenk, Federal Income Taxation, Principles and Policies (7thth ed. 2013), ISBN 978-1-60930-183-5
      If you buy a used copy of this book, please make sure to purchase the 7th edition.
    • (2) Selected Federal Taxation Statutes & Regulations, 2015 ed., Lathrope editor, West, ISBN 978-1628100846
      If purchasing a used copy of this book, it is fine to buy an earlier version (e.g., 2013 or 2014) or the newest version (2015).
  • Reading Assignment
    • Read pages 1-12 and 27-39 of the casebook, and be prepared to discuss in class.
    • Skim pages 13-27, 49-81. This material provides an overview tax terminology and the tax system. We won’t specifically discuss it during our first class. I suggest you skim it now and re-read it more closely at the end of the semester.

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Introduction to Intellectual Property through Video Games and Virtual Worlds (INTP-300-A)

Professor Silverman

  • Read pages 1-52 in Lipson & Brain, Computer and Video Game Law, Cases, Statutes, Forms, Problems & Materials (2009).

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Latinos & the Law A (INTL-322-A)

Professor Steven Bender

  • REGISTER for this class on Westlaw's TWEN.
  • Class 1: WEDNESDAY AUGUST 27
    Overview of Latina/o Stereotypes and Mistreatment of Latina/os in U.S. Law Greasers and Gringos read preface and pages 1-29

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Legal Writing II C & F (WRIT-200-C & F)

Professor Lori Bannai

Welcome to this course!

  • The first week of class, you'll be introduced to the case you'll be working on this semester, and we'll talk about preparing for the practice oral argument you'll be doing the second week of class.
  • Before our first class, I'd suggest that you read Chapter 19 in the Legal Writing Handbook (Fifth Edition) for an introduction to oral advocacy. While we won't discuss that topic until Thursday, August 28, getting that reading done beforehand will be helpful, as there will be other reading I'm going ask you to do for the 28th, as well.
  • In addition, be sure to register for the TWEN page associated with this class. I will use it to communicate with you throughout the semester.

I'm looking forward to meeting you.

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Professional Responsibility (PROF-200-A)

Professor Martin

  • Monday, August 25:
    • READ Deborah L. Rhode, The Profession and Its Discontents, 61 OHIO ST. L.J. 1335 (2000) and Personal Satisfaction in Professional Practice, 58 SYRACUSE L.REV. 217 (2008). Also read/skim Patrick J. Schiltz, On Being a Happy, Healthy, and Ethical Member of an Unhappy, Unhealthy, and Unethical Profession, 52 VAND. L. REV. 871 (1999). (You can find the articles on Westlaw or Lexis).
  • Wednesday, August 27:
    • READ Pages 1-12 (top) in the course text: Nathan M. Crystal, Professional Responsibility, Problems of Practice and the Profession (FIFTH Edition).
  • A copy of the film, To Kill a Mockingbird, is on reserve under my name in the library. Please view the film by the second week of class (September 5). If you have a chance to review it before that will be great as we will discuss it and refer to it during the first weeks of class. You may check it out and view it at your convenience or check your video store. The film is about two (2) hours in length. You may have read the book or seen the film before. However, please review it again to refresh your memory in preparation for the discussion during the second week of class. Interestingly, July 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of Harper Lee’s novel “To Kill a Mockingbird.” The story will provide a framework for discussion of several professional responsibility issues over the course of the semester, significantly, the lawyer’s role in society and the development of a philosophy of lawyering.
    • Read/skim the text of the Rules of Professional Conduct. If you have not purchased the rules supplement, You can find the text of the rules here.
      Note: It is not necessary to memorize the rules or dig deeply into the comments at this point. I merely want you to familiarize yourself with the essence of the rules of professional conduct that govern the legal profession.

I look forward to meeting you soon!

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Public International Law (INTL-300-E)

Professor Ronald C. Slye

  • Introduction to the Course: What is International and Transnational Law?
    We begin with an introduction to the course, and an introduction to the concept of transnational law. For this week and the next few weeks we will be looking at some of the fundamental building blocks of transnational, and international, law.
  • Reading:
    • Monday, August 25
      1-11; 12 – 25 (skim for general background about the field); 29 – 63
    • Wednesday, August 27
      63 – 116
  • Note: I know this may look like a lot of reading. The casebook layout is relatively large and leads to less material on each page than most other casebooks. If I discover that this pacing is a bit too fast, however, I will adjust accordingly.

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Race and Law (JURS-360-A)

Professor Chon

  • First Day
    • Reading Assignment: Anti-subordination/Anti-oppression; Identity; Racial Justice
      • DS Chapters 1 and 3
      • TWEN, Strategic Interventions for Anti-Oppression
      • Log onto TWEN by 5 p.m. Wednesday, August 27 to determine small group memberships and to post your racial identity essay to your small group forum.>
    • Writing Assignment: In class
      • I will bring copies of the last page (human figure) with agent/target memberships. Make sure to fill it out and leave it with me by the end of class.
        After the first class, prepare:
      • Required Paper I: Racial Identity Essay (2-3 pages)
      • Your essay may address one or more of the structured questions at the end of DS Chapter 3(pp. 53-54)
      • Make sure to post your Racial Identity essay on TWEN before 5 p.m. Wednesday
  • Second Day
    • Reading Assignment: Racial Identity
      • read TWEN, Understanding Oppression, part I
      • Read Racial Identity essays by others in your small group before class (this means you need access to TWEN sometime after Wednesday 5 p.m. and before class Thursday)
      • Prepare to discuss essays, along these structured questions:
        1) Are you clear about your racial identity? Why or why not?
        2) Who/what were the most significant influences in the establishment of your racial identity?
        3) What feelings and reactions did you experience while writing this essay?
    • Writing Assignment:
      • Optional Class Reaction I (post to TWEN after class):
        4) What patterns, themes or issues emerged from the group discussion regarding your racial experiences?

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Remedies (REMD-300-A)

Professor DeLong

  • Register for this class on TWEN and Read all Introductory material prior to Class 1 in the Workbook.
  • Class 1: Introduction to Remedies and Some Fundamental Principles: Preventative Injunctions and the Requirements of Propensity, Ripeness, Scope, and Specificity.
  • Read: Casebook 263-76 and Read Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 65, in the Supplement and bring a copy of the Rule to class each day until we finish with injunctions. Read Los Angeles v Lyons, in the SUPPLEMENT.
  • Prepare to discuss the cases, the questions in the casebook notes and the following questions.

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Rethinking Legal Responsibility in the Age of Neuroscience (JURS-381-A)

Professor Silverman

  • Read pages 1-109 in Gazzaniga, Who’s in Charge, Free Will and the Science of the Brain (2011).

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Tort Law (TORT-100-A)

Professor Ainsworth

  • Text: Henderson, Pearson, and Kyser, The Torts Process (8th ed.)
  • Please Register for my WestLaw TWEN “TORTS” class when you receive your WestLaw Password during Orientation.
  • Course Readings: Part One
    • {Overview of the legal profession and the legal process p. 1-9: you will find this helpful for all of your first year courses}
    • The elements of battery: p. 9-19

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Tort Law (TORT-100-B)

Professor Siegel

Welcome to law school and to torts.

  • The text for the class is Epstein & Sharkey, Cases and Materials on Torts (10th ed.).
  • For the first week, the assignment is as follows: Class #1:
    Intro and the Elements of Battery—Read the introduction (xxxiii-lv) and pp.1-14
  • Class #2:
    Defenses to Intentional Torts: Consent and Insanity: pp.14-32.
  • I have created a TWEN site for the course and posted a copy of the syllabus there; I encourage you to sign up for the site as soon as possible.

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Tort Law (TORT-100-C)

Professor Madeline Kass

  • First Assignment, August 26 & 28
    • Topic: Intentional Torts, Overview & Basic Elements
    • Diamond Treatise: §1.01 [A]-[C] & [E]-[F]
    • Prosser Casebook: pp. 1-3; 17-20 (Garratt & notes); pp. 24-25 (Ranson & notes)
    • Glannon Supplement: None
  • Texts
    • Prosser Casebook:
      Schwartz, Kelly and Partlett, PROSSER, WADE AND SCHWARTZ’S TORTS, Foundation Press, 2010 (12th Edition).
    • Diamond Treatise:
      Diamond, Levine & Madden, UNDERSTANDING TORTS, Lexis Publishing/Matthew Bender, 2010 (4th or 5th Edition).
    • Supplement:
      Glannon, THE LAW OF TORTS: EXAMPLES AND EXPLANATIONS, Fourth Edition, Aspen, 2010.

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Tort Law (TORT-100-E)

Professor Gonzalez

  • Register for this course on TWEN.
  • Henderson, Pearson & Kysar, The Torts Process (8th ed.) Please read pages 1-30. Brief the assigned cases in accordance with the briefing format for this course.

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Trusts & Estates (ESTA-300-A)

Professor Weaver

  • Register for this course on TWEN.
  • I have chosen to assign the new edition of the Dukeminier textbook this year because, among other things, I was concerned about the availability of the former edition (this is a highly popular book). But, with a somewhat new-found consciousness of the cost of law books, I will do the following.
  • Assignments will be to the new text in the first instance, but I will also indicate where readings can be found in the 8th edition, and when there are additional materials in the new edition that I can post on the TWEN site, I will post them. So for the opening assignment:
    • 9th Edition read Sections 1A, B, and C
    • In the 8th Edition read sections 1A B and D
  • We will only briefly discuss the Hodel and Shaw cases and talk more about Shapira page 3 in the 9th and page 27 in the 8th. On page 13 of the 9th (I’ll use that as an abbreviation of 9th edition), there is note about a father who wanted to condition a gift to his grandson, on the marriage of this son (the grandson’s father) to a woman. The son is gay.

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Writing Law B1 & B2 (WRIT-100-B1 & B2)

Professor Janet Dickson

  • For our first class on Tuesday, please read the first article posted under the tab labeled Syllabus/Policies and Procedures on TWEN. This article is an Op/Ed by Professor Bryan Adamson.
  • In addition, you should read the class Policies and Procedures and be ready to ask any questions you may have.

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Writing Law C1 & C2 (WRIT-100-C1 & C2)

Professor Connie Krontz

  • Read Chapters 1 and 2 and Sections 11.1-11.4.1 in The Legal Writing Handbook, Sixth Edition.
  • Be prepared to answer the questions in the quiz on page 28.

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