Spring 2014 Class Assignments

Class assignments are listed alphabetically by course name. All will be posted as received. If you do not see the assignments you are looking for, check TWEN, your professor's personal homepage or return to this web page to check again later.

Administrative Law (ADMN-300-A)

Professor Kirkwood

As background for the introductory lecture, read pages 1-15 of the casebook.

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Advanced Evidence A (EVID-350-A)

Professor Mitchell

Register on TWEN for Advanced Evidence [EVID-350-A], and review the materials preceding the syllabus.

For the first class (1/14/14):

  1. Familiarize yourself with the Freck Point case file (following the syllabus on the TWEN site).

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Advanced Evidence B (EVID-350-B)

Professor Mitchell

Register on TWEN for Advanced Evidence [EVID-350-B], and review the materials preceding the syllabus.

For the first class (1/16/14):

  1. Familiarize yourself with the Freck Point case file (following the syllabus on the TWEN site).

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Advertising Law (INTP-350-E)

Professor Joyce & Professor Glenn

Please register on TWEN.

1 1/14 Regulation of Commercial Speech Chapter 2: pp. 33-39 (Central Hudson); pp. 42-67 (Kasky v. Nike) Joyce and Glenn
2 1/21 False Advertising: Overview of Federal, State, and Self-Regulatory Scheme Chapter 3: pp. 133-35 (Vokes)Chapter 7: pp. 370-top of 381 (Phoenix); pp. 388- top of 398 (U.S. Healthcare); pp. 411-413 (American Blind) Joyce

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Business Entities A (BUSN-300-A)

Professor Russell A. Powell

Office in Sullivan 416, Phone 398-4198
Email: rpowell@seattleu.edu

Register for this course on TWEN.
TEXT: Business Entities: Cases and Materials, 2nd Ed, Eric Chiappinelli
Read Chapters 1 and 2.

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Business Entities E (BUSN-300-E)

Professor Dick

The first-day assignment for Business Entities is as follows:

  • Textbook, Pages 1-20.

Thank you and Happy New Year!

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Civil Procedure II (CIVL-325-A)

Professor Coleman

The material for this course is a “Civil Procedure II Reader” that is available for purchase in the bookstore.

For our first class meeting on Tuesday, January 14, please read 28 U.S.C. § 1291, § 1292; FRCP 54(b); FRAP 1-6; In re WorldCom, Inc., 708 F.3d 327; U.S.S.E.C. v. Citigroup Global Markets Inc., 827 F.Supp.2d 336 (2011); Mohawk Industries, Inc. v. Carpenter, 558 U.S. 100 (2009). (These are all included in the Reader.)

A TWEN site for this course has been established, and you should register for it using your Westlaw password. I will post the syllabus for this class in the next few weeks. You should read it before attending the first day.

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Christian Perspectives on the Law (JURS-317-A)

Professor Mark Chinen

The reading assignments for the course have been posted on the course TWEN site, REGISTER for this course on TWEN.

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Constitutional Law (CNLW-205-E)

Professor Halliburton

To prepare for the first two meetings of Constitutional Law, students should read pages 517-51.

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Constitutional Law II (CNLW-300-A)

Professor David Skover

All information concerning the course, including the Syllabus, is available in “Skover Online,” at
http://www.skoveronline.net/courses/index.html

For the first day of class, please familiarize yourself with the pages of the website associated with the course, and read the materials in Section I (Economic Liberties), Assignment 1 (Text 1237-1253).

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Constitutional Litigation (CNLW-305-A)

Professor Shapiro

I will provide more detail early in the New Year and I will set up a TWEN site then. In the meantime, here are the readings.

Tuesday, January 14: 1-18. The questions following the case (Monroe v. Pape) are important. Pay attention to them.

Thursday, January 16: 18-30. Again, pay close attention to the questions.

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Contracts A (CONT-105-A)

Professor DeLong

Register for this course on TWEN where your assignments are located.

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Copyright Law (INTP-320-E)

Professor Chon

Please sign up for the class TWEN site and consult the posted syllabus for the first week’s assignments.

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Corporate and Partnership Tax (TAXL-305-E)

Professor T. Roberts

Ch. 1. An Overview of Business Enterprise Taxation

  1. Introduction
    Reading Case Book: pp. 2-10, 25-33, 34-38, 394-99, skim 399-423
    Problems: pp. 33-34
  2. Tax Classification of Business Enterprises
    Reading: Code and Regs on pages 10, 12, 15
    Reading Case Book: pp/ 10-20, skim 20-22, skim 23-25
    Problems: p 22, Do Problem 1

Note:

The Case Book is:

  • Stephen Schwarz and Daniel J. Lathrope, Fundamentals of Business Taxation (5th Edition).

The students can use any up to date version of the Tax Code and Regulations.

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Corporate Governance A (BUSN-340-A)

Professor Russell A. Powell

Office in Sullivan 416, Phone 398-4198 Email rpowell@seattleu.edu

TENTATIVE SYLLABUS AVAILABLE THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS

First Assignment:
For our first class, please read the following article: 22 Comp. Lab. L. & Pol'y J. 97

Second Assignment:
For our second class, please read:
Dodge v. Ford, 204 Mich. 459; and Shlensky v. Wrigley, 95 Ill.App.2d 173

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Criminal Motions Practice (CRIM-340-E)

Professor Goldsmith

January 13: Overview lecture: class expectations & Bail hearings.
Optional: Westerman v. Cary, 125 Wn.2d 277, 892 P.2d 1067 (1994); and Butler v. Kato, 137 Wn. App. 515 (Wash. Ct. App. 2007).

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Criminal Procedure Investigative (CRIM-305-A)

Professor Ahrens

Register for the TWEN site and complete the reading assignment posted under the "course materials" tab.

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Employment Discrimination (EMPL-315-A)

Professor Martin

Hello. I look forward to meeting you all soon.

During the first week, we will have an Introduction to the course material.

I will post on TWEN a few short articles (2-10 pages each) that you should read by the end of the first week of class. The articles will be posted under the “Reference Materials” link.

Thank you, Professor Martin

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Environmental Justice (ENVL-380-A)

Professor O’Neill

Course Materials

The materials for this course will draw heavily on Clifford Rechtschaffen, Eileen Gauna, and Catherine A. O’Neill, Environmental Justice: Law, Policy & Regulation (2d. ed. 2009). In addition to written materials, we will rely on oral narratives presented by guest speakers, or via audio/video recordings. Finally, given that this course is a seminar, discussion among the class participants will comprise an important part of the materials for the course.

Assignment

For our first meeting, please read the following materials from Rechtschaffen, Gauna & O’Neill:

Overview of the Environmental Justice Movement Pages 3-33

First Class Meeting

We have an extraordinary opportunity for our first class meeting, given that senior staff working on environmental justice issues at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be visiting the Pacific Northwest, as part of their effort to reach out to community groups working on environmental justice issues. Specifically, Matt Tejada, the new Director of the Office of Environmental Justice, and Lisa Garcia, Senior Advisor to the Administrator for Environmental Justice (please see biographies, below), will be in Seattle on Tuesday, January 14, 2014. In order to accommodate the community groups who have indicated their interest in meeting with Mr. Tejada and Ms. Garcia, EPA will hold this meeting at the law school. EPA has also graciously agreed to permit our class to attend this meeting as observers. (That is, our aim will be to hear first-hand local community groups’ concerns and to observe how EPA responds to these concerns. We will not be seeking speaking roles; this meeting, rather, is intended for community groups to interact with EPA and it is they who will have the “floor.”)

The EPA-community partners meeting will be held in Room 110 of the law school, from 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. Please note that the time and venue are different than our ordinarily scheduled class. Because most students do not have classes during this time on Tuesdays, I expect that most of you will not have difficulty in making this substitution. However, I understand that work or family commitments may make it impossible for some of you to attend. Please e-mail me either way, to confirm whether you can attend. My e-mail is oneillc@seattleu.edu. When you come to Room 110 next Tuesday, please be mindful of our status as observers, e.g., by giving priority seating to community members and/or by seeking direction from EPA organizers.

Biographical Materials and Links

Matthew Tejada has been selected to serve as EPA’s Director for the Office of Environmental Justice in headquarters. Matt brings to the job extensive experience advocating for communities and working with local organizations, government agencies and businesses to find solutions that reduce pollution in overburdened communities. Matt will join us from Air Alliance Houston (AAH), in Houston Texas, where he served for over five years as Executive Director working to protect and improve public health and environmental quality in and around the Houston area. In this capacity, he guided research, education, and advocacy efforts on a range of environmental legal, policy and technical matters and has earned recognition as an air quality expert and environmental leader in the Texas Gulf Coast region. As Director, Matt also developed a plan to merge two separate organizations for cost efficiency purposes and more than doubled AAH's operating budget.

He has partnered closely with community organizations across Texas and other states on environmental health issues such as cumulative air quality concerns in urban low income and minority communities, and recently helped to build the Texas Healthy Port Communities Network, which focuses on building partnerships with community organizations in port areas to reduce impacts from heavy industry and goods movement and improve environmental stewardship in future decision-making. Under Matt's leadership, AAH also rejuvenated and funded several youth environmental programs, particularly programs that focus on grades K- 8. Prior to his position at AAH, Matt worked at the Texas Public Interest Research Group and served in the Peace Corps in Bulgaria. Matt received his Doctorate and Masters from the University of Oxford in Oxford UK, and graduated magna cum laude from the University of Texas at Austin.

Lisa Garcia joined the U.S. EPA serving as Senior Advisor to the Administrator for Environmental Justice. In this role Lisa will help elevate EJ issues to the highest levels of the agency and work across programs to integrate and strengthen all of EPA’s EJ initiatives. Lisa’s work will promote meaningful, working relationships with EJ communities, as well as build strong partnerships to address some of the country’s most persistent environmental challenges.

Lisa joins EPA after serving as the Chief Advocate for Environmental Justice and Equity at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. In that position she developed statewide environmental justice initiatives to tackle critical environmental challenges, and served as co-chair of the Governor’s Environmental Justice Interagency Task Force. Lisa also served as Assistant Attorney General for the New York State Attorney General, where she represented various state agencies in environmental litigation matters and defended New York’s Brownfields Cleanup Program. Lisa also served as Senior Attorney at the New York Public Interest Research Group. Lisa has a long and impressive history using her legal, policy and legislative experience to promote environmental justice.

See New York Times article, at http://www.nytimes.com/gwire/2011/04/13/13greenwire-epa-wears-many-hats-in-sprawling-environmental-j-683.html?pagewanted=all

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Environmantal Law Growth Management (ENVL-375-A)

Professor McGuire

Please register on TWEN

Week #1: January 13 & 15

Introductions and Expectations –Discussion of Sprawl?

Discussion of Sprawl

  • Overhead materials

Optional Readings and Resources regarding Sprawl:

Growth Control and Management Overview - generally
Reading:

  • From Growth Controls, to Comprehensive Planning, to Smart Growth, Planning’s Emerging Fourth Wave, Timothy S. Chapin, Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 78, No. 1, Winter 2012. Handout at first class.

Optional Reading and Resources:

  • Smart Growth Policies: An Evaluation of Programs and Outcomes, Lincoln Land Institute, 2009 www.lincolninst.edu/pubs/dl/1571 855 Web Chapter pdf [Not Appendices]
  • OPTIONAL ”The Growth Management Revolution in Washington: Past, Present, and Future”, Richard L. Settle and Charles G. Gavigan, University of Puget Sound Law Review, Volume 16, Spring 1993, Number 3, pages 867-941 – [Interesting political background and synopsis of the process.]

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Estate Planning (ESTA-305-E)

Professor Marten

In advance of each class, read the assigned page sections of the Price text and the applicable section(s) of the Code and Regulations.

For the first 2 classes: Price Text: (1) Pages 2013-2034; (2) Pages 2035-2074.

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Evidence A (EVID-200-A)

Professor A. Roberts

Happy New Year, and welcome to Evidence. I greatly look forward to working with you all, and invite you to email me with any questions about the course.

Please make sure that you do the following before our January 13th class:

  • Get a copy of our casebook, which is Sklansky, Evidence: Cases, Commentary, and Problems (3d ed. 2012) (“Sklansky”);
  • In addition to Sklansky, I recommend that you consider purchasing a copy of any Federal Rules of Evidence rulebook. (If you search for Federal Rules of Evidence on Amazon, you’ll see a range of options.) Since the Federal Rules of Evidence were amended most recently in 2011, it must be a collection published in 2012 or later. If you prefer, you can find the rules at the following website - http://www.law.cornell.edu/rules/fre - but if you use the website instead of a rulebook I recommend printing out the rules so that you can refer to them easily in class.
  • Please read Sklansky pp. 8 – 38, as well as Federal Rules of Evidence 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 401, 402, and 403. Come to class ready to discuss your analyses of the problems on p. 16 and p. 38.
  • Please register for our TWEN page – Evidence A.
  • Please email me if your preferred name is different from the one on the official roster, and/or if it would be helpful for me to have guidance on how to pronounce your name.

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Evidence B (EVID-200-B)

Professor Mitchell

The course materials are:

  1. Learning Evidence: From the Federal Rules to the Courtroom, 2d, November 8th, 2011, Authors: Merritt and Simmons, Publisher, WEST
  2. On-line materials on TWEN.

For the first class (1/14/14):

  1. Go on TWEN and register for “EVIDENCE B.”
  2. Read all the text on the course TWEN page (Make certain you scroll past the list of 27 lessons and read the materials which follow, including the Attendance Policy).
  3. Now, go back to “Lessons,” and click on “Lesson One.” This will show the assigned readings from the Merritt text as well as provide links to the on-line materials for the class.

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Family Formation (FAML-310-A)

Professor Julie Shapiro

Class 1. Monday, January 13, 2014. Read pages 1-19. Please review the TWEN pages before this class. (These pages are currently under construction but will be available soon.)

  • We will discuss class policies and expectations. If you have questions, this would be a good time to ask them. I’ll also introduce some of the “big themes” of the course. I may also ask each of you to introduce yourself (it depends on how big the class is.)
  • After that, we will move to the first readings. The excerpt from Coontz (pages 3-5) is largely descriptive. One aspect of that is that it is full of statistics. How important are these statistics? Why are they important? Do we need to be able to assess how reliable they are? Pick out one statistic that seems noteworthy to you. It need not be one you agree with—it could be something you question or something that surprises you or something you think is very important. Be prepared to identify your chosen statistic and explain why you chose it. (If you have a background in statistics you might be able to help all of us view these statistics critically.)
  • What is the overall importance of the general trend(s) Coontz identifies? Do we know if these are good or bad trends? How would we decide that? Though the editors of the book have captioned the Coontz excerpt “Proponents of Change” it is not clear to me that the excerpt included offers a judgment on the changes described. Does it?
  • Read the excerpt from Cere (pages 5-7). Identify one sentence that you find noteworthy. It need not be something you agree with. It could be something you don’t understand, or something that makes you angry, or something that you think is insightful or interesting. As above, be prepared to explain why you made the choice you did.
  • Do you think the meaning or role of marriage is in flux? If so, what has caused this to happen? Is it a bad thing? Can it be stopped?
  • What institutions in society define the meaning/role of marriage? Courts? Legislatures? The broader electorate? Religion? Popular culture? What is the relationship between the various definitions?
  • What should we do about/with the observations in the reading at pages 8-10? It seems like it might be a problem that the risks of divorce correlate to income/education. Should we be trying to think of something to do about that?
  • Can you harmonize the seemingly conflicting views of Millennials noted at the bottom of page 9? Think carefully about the terms being used.
  • Read 12-19. I expect that some of you read Moore v. City of East Cleveland in constitutional law. For the moment we may discuss it in a cursory fashion. We’ll be coming back to do con law in a much more sustained way shortly. For now, focus on these questions:
  • Who lived in Mrs. Moore’s house? Why was this a problem?
  • Is it fair to say the case is about what “family” means as it is used in the East Cleveland code? How does this end up before the United States Supreme Court? What does the Court say? What is the basis for its ruling?
  • If you were given the job of redrafting the East Cleveland ordinance after the case was decided, what would you do? Is it reasonable to zone some neighborhoods for family homes?


Class 2. Wednesday, January 15, 2014. Read 217-222.

  • Please read this short case with care and give it some thought. What did Mrs. McGuire want from the court? Why is the court unwilling to help her? Is it because the judges do not believe she is entitled to what she wants or is there some other concern operating?
  • What policies support the court's decision? What are the strengths and weaknesses of this position?
  • Under what circumstances would the court order more generous support for Mrs. McGuire? What advice could you give Mrs. McGuire about how she could obtain more generous support? Does this make any sense? Note the year that McGuire was decided. Is that significant?
  • Is McGuire a product of archaic assumptions? Do you think the case would come out differently today? Why? Should it? If you were a judge today sitting on a case like McGuire, what would you do?
  • Is recognition of some sphere of marital privacy into which a court will not venture, a good idea? Why? Even if you do not think it is a good idea, try and think of some reasons why others might endorse such a policy.
  • When should the state interfere in a personal relationship? Why? Does it depend on the particular nature of the relationship (friends, lovers, siblings, etc.)? Why?
  • What does the case tell us about the importance of any model for marital obligation adopted by the state?
  • In the following classes, we will begin consideration of some of the constitutional questions which pervade modern family law. Some of these are equal protection questions: Does the Constitution require that family law be gender neutral? Are there any areas in which the law would permit disparate treatment of men and women? On what grounds could you seek to justify disparate treatment? What about different treatment for married/unmarried couples? Other questions arise under the doctrine of substantive due process: Are there areas of private life into which the government cannot constitutionally intrude, for example. Though you have all taken or are taking con law I will outline some basics of both equal protection and substantive due process so that we can all begin with some shared working knowledge of these critical areas. Feel free to add to or question my presentation based on your own understanding from your con law class.
  • Please remember that distinct from constitutional arguments, there are policy arguments for and against specific outcomes. Thus, one can ask whether family law must be gender neutral (a con law question) or, even if not constitutionally required, it should be gender neutral (a policy question). Similarly, even if the Constitution does not require a zone of privacy around certain types of individual or family decisions, should we create such a zone anyway? Over the course of the semester you will need to learn to separate policy questions and con law questions and to make the right sorts of arguments in the right places.

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Federal Courts (CIVL-305-A)

Professor David Skover

All information concerning the course, including the Syllabus, is available in “Skover Online,” at
http://www.skoveronline.net/courses/index.html

For the first day of class, please familiarize yourself with the pages of the website associated with the course, and read the materials in Section I (Introduction), Assignment 1 (Pushaw article).

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Film and the Law (JURS 415-A)

Professor Berger

Register for this class on TWEN. Begin by reading the Course Description.
Go to Classes 1 and 3 and follow all instructions.

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Immigration Law (IMMG 300-E)

Professor Misner-Pollard

Class 1 – Tuesday, January 14, 2014.
Introduction and Citizenship: Jus Sanguinis and Jus Soli.

Optional background reading assignment:
History of immigration to the U.S.

  • Casebook (Aleinikoff, Martin, Motomura & Fullerton, 7th ed.) pages 1-36
  • Kurzbans history (will be posted on TWEN)

Reading assignment (for class discussion):

  • Read pages 37-80 in the casebook. (Exercise on pages 49-50 not necessary.)
  • Skim INA sections INA §§ 301-308 in the Aleinikoff supplement.
  • Work through Problems 1 and 2 on pages 41-42 of the casebook.
  • Cases: Nguyen / Flores-Villar
    U.S. v. Wong Kim Ark
  • Questions to consider:
    • Does Wong Kim Ark persuasively distinguish the treatment of Native Americans in Elk v. Wilkins? Why or why not?
    • Explain the logic, or lack thereof, in Chief Justice Fuller’s Wong Kim Ark dissent in which he asserts that birthright citizenship rules cannot confer citizenship on children who are not eligible to naturalize?
    • If jus soli were eliminated for a child of undocumented parents, what would be the practical consequences? What would such a change say about what it means to be a U.S. citizen?
    • How do the arguments regarding jus soli citizenship for a child of undocumented parents compare to those as for a child of lawfully present tourists? Should birth on U.S. soil confer citizenship regardless of the parents’ immigration status?

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International Investment Law (INTL-322-A)

Professor Mark Chinen

The reading assignments for the first week have been posted on the course TWEN site, REGISTER for this course on TWEN.

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Intellectual Property: Law, Society & Technology (INTP-150-A)

Professor Chon

Please sign up for the class TWEN site and consult the posted syllabus for the first week’s assignments.

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Law and Religion (JURS-365-A)

Professor Halliburton

To prepare for the first two meetings of Law and Religion, students should read pages 1-29 of the assigned text.

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Legal Research Skills (LRES-500-A)

Professor Kelly Kunsch

The course materials for the class are posted on Lexis Blackboard (access requires a Lexis password). Enrolled students should have received an email providing more detailed information on signing onto Blackboard. Lexis is taking Blackboard offline January 2-4 so students should plan accordingly. If students did not get the email, they can contact Kelly Kunsch at Kunsch@seattleu.edu

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Products Liability (TORT 300-E)

Professor Gordon

Please register on TWEN.
Please read the syllabus on TWEN.
The password is: PL2014SU

Monday, January 13, 2014:

  • Introductory Lecture: What is the Most Complicated (and Interesting(!)) Thing in the Universe?? Review of Syllabus and Website.
  • Readings: Casebook: 1-16.
  • Writing Assignments: Problem No. 1 [Mandatory] due Wednesday, January 22, 2014. Check Table of Deadlines at the end of this Syllabus regarding all other Problem, Quiz, assignment deadlines.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014:

  • Lecture: Products Liability: Where the Rubber Meets the Road.
    CLASS DEBATE: PUBLIC V. PRIVATE REGULATION OF RISKS
  • Readings: Casebook: 16-40; Anthology: 105-120
  • Online Quiz: Quiz No. 1 due next Wednesday. Check Table of Deadlines at the end of this Syllabus regarding due dates for all problems, quizzes and assignments.

Note: Be sure to start and finish the Quiz at one sitting – opening up the Quiz and then signing off before you finish will result in your receiving a partial grade and not being able to sign in to take the quiz again unless it is reset by the instructor. The Quiz consists of 4 or 5 multiple choice questions and is open book and open notes, but it must be your individual work. Students report that – even for the first one when you are unfamiliar with the program – it is easily accomplished in about thirty minutes or less even with having to refer to notes and readings. Of course, it can be done much faster if you know the answers.

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Professional Responsibility A (PROF-150-A)

Professor Strait

Register for this class on TWEN.

Text: ETHICAL PROBLEMS IN THE PRACTICE OF LAW, 3RD ED. by Lerman and Schrag;
Professional RESPONSIBILITY, STANDARDS, RULES AND STATUTES by Dzienkowski

Class 1, Tuesday, January 14

  • Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law, by Lerman and Schrag (hereafter LS) INTRODUCTION. pp. 1-13; CH. 1, THE REGULATION OF LAWYERS, pp. 19 – 45
  • Go to the CALI Folder on TWEN. Read the CALI Student Instructions sheet and follow them for submitting to the CALI Assignment Dropbox
  • --Do CALI exercise: Sources of Law Regulating the Practice of Law (1 hour) and submit a screen capture to the drop box per your CALI Student Instructions (above)

Class 2, Thursday, January 16

  • LS CH. 1, THE REGULATION OF LAWYERS, pp. 45 – 79, Admission to Practice
    • In Re Wright
    • Wright Jimi Petition
  • for class discussion:
    • WA Admission to Practice Rule (APR) 3 and
    • WA APR 21-24
    • Universal Bar Exam Application for Bar Examination
    • Application Instructions to the WA ST Bar and URL Link
    • Sample WA ST Bar Application Form

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Professional Responsibility A (PROF-200-A)

Professor Martin

Tuesday, January 14:

  1. READ Deborah L. Rhode, The Profession and Its Discontents, 61 OHIO ST. L.J. 1335 (2000). You can read/skim Patrick J. Schiltz, On Being a Happy, Healthy, and Ethical Member of an Unhappy, Unhealthy, and Unethical Profession, 52 VAND. L. REV. 871 (1999). (You can find the articles on Westlaw or Lexis).

Thursday, January 16:

  1. READ Pages 1-12 (top) in the course text: Nathan M. Crystal, Professional Responsibility, Problems of Practice and the Profession (FIFTH Edition).

A copy of the film, To Kill a Mockingbird, is on reserve under my name in the library. Please view the film by the second week of class (January 23). If you have a chance to review it before that will be great as we will discuss it and refer to it during the first weeks of class. You may check it out and view it at your convenience or check your video store. The film is about two (2) hours in length. You may have read the book or seen the film before. However, please review it again to refresh your memory in preparation for the discussion during the second week of class. Interestingly, July 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of Harper Lee’s novel “To Kill a Mockingbird.” The story will provide a framework for discussion of several professional responsibility issues over the course of the semester, significantly, the lawyer’s role in society and the development of a philosophy of lawyering.

  1. Read/skim the text of the Rules of Professional Conduct. If you have not purchased the rules supplement, You can find the text of the rules at:

    http://www.americanbar.org/groups/professional_responsibility/publications/model_rules_of_professional_conduct/model_rules_of_professional_conduct_table_of_contents.html

    Note: It is not necessary to memorize the rules or dig deeply into the comments at this point. I merely want you to familiarize yourself with the essence of the rules of professional conduct that govern the legal profession.

I look forward to meeting you soon!

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Professional Responsibility E (PROF-200-E)

Professor Strait

Register for this class on TWEN.

Text: ETHICAL PROBLEMS IN THE PRACTICE OF LAW, 3RD ED. by Lerman and Schrag;
Professional RESPONSIBILITY, STANDARDS, RULES AND STATUTES by Dzienkowski

Class 1, Tuesday, January 14

  • Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law, by Lerman and Schrag (hereafter LS) INTRODUCTION. pp. 1-13; CH. 1, THE REGULATION OF LAWYERS, pp. 19 – 45
  • Go to the CALI Folder on TWEN. Read the CALI Student Instructions sheet and follow them for submitting to the CALI Assignment Dropbox
  • --Do CALI exercise: Sources of Law Regulating the Practice of Law (1 hour) and submit a screen capture to the drop box per your CALI Student Instructions (above)

Class 2, Thursday, January 16

  • LS CH. 1, THE REGULATION OF LAWYERS, pp. 45 – 79, Admission to Practice
    • In Re Wright
    • Wright Jimi Petition
  • for class discussion:
    • WA Admission to Practice Rule (APR) 3 and
    • WA APR 21-24
    • Universal Bar Exam Application for Bar Examination
    • Application Instructions to the WA ST Bar and URL Link
    • Sample WA ST Bar Application Form

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Property A (PROP-300-A)

Professor O’Neill

The required texts for this course are Joseph William Singer, Property Law: Rules, Policies, and Practices (5th ed. 2010) ["Singer"]; materials available via the TWEN site for the course [“TWEN”]; and occasional photocopied materials distributed in class.

For our first class meeting, please prepare the following materials:

Background: “A Guide to the Book” Singer, xliii-lxii
Labor, Investment, Possession: Wild Animals and Baseballs Singer, 152-60

NB: We will meet for the first time on Thursday, January 16, 2014. Class is cancelled for Tuesday, January 14, 2014, due to a field trip that I will be taking with my seminar students.

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Property C (PROP-100-C)

Professor Weaver

Register for this course on TWEN where your assignments will be posted in Course Materials when they are available.

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Race and Equity in Public Education (EDUL-360-A)

Professor Bender

Please register on TWEN for the course.

January 14:
Framing our discussion of race, poverty and public education; where are we now?
Schuette, Att’y Gen. of MI v. Coalition to Defend, et al., United States Supreme Court Docket No. 12-682 (Case has been argued but not decided)

DECISION BELOW: 701 F.3d 466, 6th Cir; Nov. 15, 2012;

JUSTICE KAGAN TOOK NO PART;
CERT. GRANTED 3/25/2013;
QUESTION PRESENTED (Before the Supreme Court):

Whether a state violates the Equal Protection Clause by amending its constitution to prohibit race and sex-based discrimination or preferential treatment in public-university admission decisions?

Prior to class, listen to the October 15, 2013 Oral Argument before the Supreme Court – accessible on the Supreme Court website here.

  • A PDF transcript of the Oral Argument is also available at this web address.

Be prepared to orally argue the respective sides of the question presented in class; (Division of the class for purposes of argument and key questions you can anticipate will be posted on TWEN)

Review at least the following briefs before the Supreme Court in this case to help inform your position:

Brief for Petitioner: 2013 WL 3245160

Brief for Respondents, The Regents of the University of Michigan, et al; 2013 WL 4507957

Amicus Brief of Paul Finkleman and 75 other Historians and Scholars as Amicus Curiae in Support of Respondents: 2013 WL 4737192

Brief Amicus Curiae, of the Pacific Legal Foundation, et al in Support of Petitioners: 2013 WL 3362090

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Remedies (REMD-300-A)

Professor Weaver

Register for this course on TWEN where your assignments will be posted in Course Materials when they are available.

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Street Law (STRL-300-A)

Professor Fisher

Law students should prepare the sign-up sheet and read the Handbook posted on the TWEN site, which is now updated.

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Torts (TORT-105-C)

Professor Siegel

No assignment for first class sesssion. Please read pp. 495-511 for the second class session.

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Tribal Governmental Gaming (INDL-330-A)

Professor Eberbard

Read the syllabus, read and be prepared to discuss the following cases:

  1. US v. Sosseur, 181 F.2d 873 (7th Cir. 1950)
  2. US v. Farris, 624 F.2d 890 (9th Cir. 198
  3. Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Butterworth, 658 F.2d 310 (5th Cir. 1981)
  4. Barona v. Duffy, 694 F.2d 1185 (9th Cir. 1982)

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Trusts and Estates (ESTA-300-A & E)

Professor Eason

  • The reading assignments for the first few classes are set forth below. A TWEN site has been created for the course. Please register, as the full syllabus and other important information will be posted there soon.
  • Most of the statutory provisions noted on the syllabus can be found in Title 11 of the RCW, at http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?Cite=11. I will also provide a statutory supplement compilation via the TWEN site under the “Handouts” tab. You will have some version of this supplement available for use during the final exam, as will be discussed in class.
  • For assignment #2, you can find the relevant Washington RPC’s at http://www.courts.wa.gov/court_rules/?fa=court_rules.list&group=ga&set=rpc. Cases will be posted by Monday.
TOPIC (NO. OF CLASS SESSIONS) ASSIGNMENT (TEXT) NOTES, STATUTES, ETC.
A. INTRODUCTION (3)
General Introduction; Testamentary Freedom & the Dead Hand; •Read Ch. 1A (pp. 1-41) *This longer reading will likely carry-over to our 2nd class •RCW§§11.20.010; 11. 28.120; 11.40.020; 11.40.030; 11.40.051; 11.40.70(3) & (4); 11.62.10; 11.68.011
Professional Responsibility; The Probate System; Probate and Nonprobate Property •Ch. 1B, 1C (pp. 41-62); pp. 170-71 (Safeguarding); pp. 307-09 (Bequests & Appts)
•Skim Letter & Will pp.981-83 & List of Assets & Liabilities pp. 986-89
• WA RPC’s §§1.6; 1.7; 1.8; 1.10;
1.14; •RCW §30.04.260; §11.20.070
•Add: PARKS V. FINK (On TWEN)
B. INTESTACY & RELATIONSHIPS (3-4)
Underlying Policies; General Statutory Scheme; Share of Spouses; Shares of Others •Ch. 2 pp. 63-81 •WA Intestacy Statutory Scheme (per supplement); Com. Prop. Mgt. §26.16.030
•Per Stirpes – all 3 variations (noting §11.02.005(3) for WA)
•Add: ESTATE OF MORGAN

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UCC Sales (COMM-350-A)

Professor DeLong

Register for this course on TWEN where your assignments are located.

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US Supreme Court Practice Sem (CNLW-415-A)

Professor Siegel

First class: Please read pp. 1-19 of our coursebook and skim the statistical report on the last Supreme Court term available at http://sblog.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/SCOTUSblog_StatPack_OT121.pdf

Second class: Please read pp. 21-75 of our coursebook.

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