Academics

Spring 2015 Class Assignments

Class assignments are listed alphabetically by course name. All will be posted as received. If you do not see the assignments you are looking for, check TWEN, your professor's personal homepage, or return to this web page to check again later.

Administrative Law A (ADMN-300-A)

Professor Kirkwood

  • Please register for this course on TWEN. Your Syllabus is now posted.
  • As background for the introductory lecture, read pages 1 – 15 of the casebook.
  • Casebook: Ronald A. Cass, Colin S. Diver, Jack M. Beermann, and Jody Freeman, Administrative Law: Cases and Materials (6th ed. 2011)

top

Business Entities A (BUSN-300-A)

Professor Russell Powell

  • Textbook: Business Entities: Cases and Materials (3rd Ed.) by Professor Eric Chiappinelli
  • Read Chapters 1 and 2 in Chiappinelli's Business Entities: Cases and Materials

top

Business Entities E (BUSN-300-E)

Professor Mark Chinen

  • Your first assignment is also posted on TWEN.
  • Monday, January 12 – Introduction, Basic Concepts, Agency
    • Reading
      • O’KELLY & THOMPSON refers to the casebook, CHARLES R.T. O’KELLEY & ROBERT THOMPSON, CORPORATIONS AND OTHER BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS: CASES AND MATERIALS (6th ed. 2010). Often a section of the casebook will begin with references to statutes, model codes or restatements of law (see e.g. O’KELLY & THOMPSON at 39). Those references should be considered part of the reading assignment.
      • O’KELLY & THOMPSON 1-29
    • Questions
      • Some Basic Concepts and Terminology
        • According to Frank Knight, what are the two tasks of an entrepreneur?
        • How does R.H. Coase distinguish a firm from the market?
        • According to Berle & Means, in what sense does the modern corporation challenge American understandings of governance?
        • What contribution did Jensen & Meckling make to the theory of the corporation?
        • What are agency costs? What strategies are used to reduce them?
        • What impact did the Enron scandal and the Great Recession have on corporate governance?
      • Organizing the Firm: Selecting a Value-Maximizing Governance Structure
        • In what sense can a business entity be understood as a solution to the problem of choosing between investment options?
        • What role do transaction costs, state-provided governance structures, and non-judicial mechanisms play in deciding how to organize?
      • The Firm and the Law of Agency
        • Be prepared to discuss the Community Counselling Service, Inc. and Hamburger cases. What is your response to Question 3 on page 29?
        • Do you agree that fiduciary duty is largely a contractual device supplied by the state to principals and agents? Is this the best way to conceive of fiduciary duties?
  • Wednesday, January 14 – Agency (cont.)
    • Reading
      • O’KELLY & THOMPSON 39-49
    • Questions
      • What are the forms of agency authority?
      • Under the Restatement 3rd of Agency, when is a principal bound to contracts entered by an agent? When is an agent bound by those contracts?

top

Constitutional Law II A (CNLW-300-A)

Professor Siegel

  • Monday: Class #1: Introduction: The Evolution of Constitutional Rights and the Problem of Incorporation
    • pp. xli-lvii (3rd ed: check pages) (text of Constitution)
    • pp. 517-548 (3rd ed: 523-547)
  • Wednesday: Class #2: The State Action Doctrine
    • pp. 548-600 (3rd ed: 548-599) (focus on Marsh, Jackson, Terry, Burton, and Moose Lodge; skim other cases)

top

Constitutional Law II B (CNLW-300-B)

Professor David Skover

  • All information concerning the course, including the Syllabus, is available in “Skover Online
  • For the first day of class, please familiarize yourself with the pages of the website associated with the course, and read the materials in Section I (The State Action Doctrine), Assignment 1 (Text 1273-1288).

top

Contracts C (CONT-105-C)

Professor Chinen

  • Your First Assignment is posted on TWEN also.
  • Monday: Review Session 3 (remedies)
    • Reading
      • Lon L. Fuller & William R. Purdue, Jr, The Reliance Interest in Contract Damages, 46 YALE L. J. 52 (1936), read pages 56-66, 71-79 (to the end of the first full paragraph)
    • Questions
      • According to the authors, what is the purpose of contract damages?
      • Of the three interests the authors identify, which provide the most compelling reasons for a court to intervene and award damages?
      • What is the justification for awarding expectation damages?
      • What is the relationship between the reliance interest and the other interests?
      • Why should expectation serve as a cap on damages?
  • Wednesday: No class

top

Contracts E (CONT-105-E)

Professor DeLong

  • You should already be registered for this course on TWEN.
  • On Monday, January 12, do Unit 1 in the Spring 2015 Workbook and on Wednesday, January 14, do Unit 2.

top

Corporate and Partnership Tax A (TAXL-305-A)

Professor Dick

  • Below are the reading assignments for the first week of the course. I reserve the right to modify the assignments from time to time, and to utilize additional handouts and materials. All assignments are from the required text unless otherwise noted. Problems are not assigned unless noted below, but you may want to read them as they are useful to enhance your understanding of the material. Where problems are included in the assignment, please be prepared to discuss them in class. On occasion, however, time may not permit such discussion. Your review and preparation of the problems will nevertheless be a helpful exercise.
  • Please be sure to review relevant code sections and regulations associated with each reading assignment. I recommend you complete your assignments in the following order: first, read the textbook, then the statutes, and finally regulations; then, tackle the problems.
  • 1/13 - Introduction; Business Entity Classification
    • Textbook: Read pages 2-38.
    • Code: Read §§761(a),(b), 7701(a)(2),(3); skim 7704, 469(k)
    • Regs: §§1.761-1(a),(b),-2(a), 301.7701-1,-2,-3
    • Problems: Complete Problem 1 on Page 22.
  • 1/15 - Partnership Formation
    • Textbook: Read pages 40-46; skim 47-53.
    • Code: §§721, 722, 723, 1223(1),(2).
    • Regs: §§1.721-1, 1.722-1, 1.723-1.
    • Problems: Complete the Problem on Pages 46-47.
  • Required Text: Stephen Schwarz and Daniel Lathrope, Fundamentals of Business Enterprise Taxation (5th Edition)

top

Criminal Motions Practice E (CRIM-340-E)

Professor Goldsmith

  • January 12: Overview lecture: class expectations & Bail hearings.
  • Optional: Westerman v. Cary, 125 Wn.2d 277, 892 P.2d 1067 (1994).

top

Criminal Procedure Adjudicative A (CRIM-300-A)

Professor Anna Roberts

  • I wanted to get you the necessary information about the casebook and the first reading assignment, so that you can all be ready for our first class. I'll be emailing you with additional information during the week. Please don't hesitate to be in touch with me if you have any questions or concerns about the class.
  • The casebook for this course is: Criminal Procedure: Adjudication, 2011 Ronald Jay Allen, William J. Stuntz, Joseph L. Hoffmann, Debra A. Livingston, Andrew D. Leipold
  • Monday, January 12 class, please read pp. 961-84, and focus on the following 3 assignments:
    1. This class focuses on critical responses to the materials, and on active learning, so please come ready to discuss any concerns about the material and any questions that the material provokes.
    2. For each of the 3 main cases, please isolate the legal rule(s) established, the rationales used to get there, and any reactions that you have.
    3. One additional question: what's the legal question that the Court had to answer in Armstrong?
  • Finally, as part of the process of getting to know each of you (better), please do let me know if there are any tips that you want to give me for the pronunciation of your name. And, if you haven't already, please sign up for the TWEN page for this class as soon as possible, so that I can communicate with you that way.—Professor Roberts
  • Wednesday, Jan 14. All future assignments will be disseminated through TWEN.
    • Please read pp. 989-1004, and Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6(d) and 6(e) – Rule 6 is on the TWEN site. Please also read this webpage, and the complaint that it links to (the exhibits to the complaint are optional reading)
    • Please come ready to discuss your answers to the following:
      1. Scrutinize the Supreme Court’s justifications for grand jury secrecy at the bottom of 993, and make sure you understand them all. What sort of objections to this secrecy might there be?
      2. What is the legal question that the court has to answer in In re Sealed Case?
      3. What do you think are the strongest arguments that the OIC should lose in In re Sealed Case?

top

Evidence A (EVID-200-A)

Professor Anna Roberts

  • Please make sure that you have the casebook and have done the reading in advance of our first class.
  • The casebook is: Sklansky, Evidence: Cases, Commentary, and Problems (3d ed. 2012) (“Sklansky”)
  • In addition to Sklansky, you will need to get hold of the Federal Rules of Evidence. Since there have been some recent amendments, I recommend getting them as needed from this website - http://www.law.cornell.edu/rules/fre . If you do this, make sure you have the relevant rules handy for class, either electronically or in hard copy.
  • Alternatively/ in addition, you could purchase a hard copy of a Federal Rules of Evidence rulebook, but if you do so, stick to one that's just the rules (or the rules and legislative history), rather than one that has additional editorial content, and look for one that's as recent as possible so that you're as up-to-date as possible with the amendments. Reach out if you have any questions about selecting one.
  • Assignment for Monday, Jan 12:
    • Please read pp. 8 – 24 of Sklansky (stop before "Probative Value and Prejudice"), as well as Federal Rules of Evidence 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 401, and 402 (Sklansky indicates when each of the rules is being discussed). Come to class ready to discuss your analyses of the problems on p. 16.
  • Assignment for Wednesday, Jan 14:
    • Please read pp. 24 – 44, and Federal Rules of Evidence 403, 801, and 802
    • Please come to class ready to discuss your analyses of each of the "Problems" contained within the reading.
  • Some additional notes:
    • Please register for the TWEN page ASAP, so that I can communicate with you that way.
    • Please email me if your preferred name is different from the one on the official roster, and/or if it would be helpful for me to have guidance on how to pronounce your name.
    • All future assignments will be disseminated through TWEN.
  • I look forward to seeing you on Monday! Please be in touch if you have any questions or concerns about the course.

top

Evidence Lab A (EVID-301-A)

Professor Mitchell & Professor Gonzalez

  • All materials for this course are on the course TWEN page.
  • You will also want to have a copy of the Federal Rules of Evidence, which you should have from your Evidence course or which you can obtain on-line.
  • The first Evidence Lab class is Tuesday. February 10th. Go to TWEN and register for “EVIDENCE LAB” with your WestLaw password. The Syllabus (where you will find the first assignment), the course description, course requirements, and the attendance policy are all on the web page.

top

Indian Law and Natural Resources A (INDL-315-A)

Professor O'Neill

  • The required text for this course is Judith V. Royster, Michael C. Blumm, and Elizabeth Ann Kronk, Native American Natural Resources Law: Cases and Materials (3d. ed., 2013) [NANRL]; and other materials available via the TWEN site for the course; [“TWEN”].
  • Materials denoted with an (S) need only be skimmed.
  • A number of additional resources will also be posted to the TWEN site for the course. These materials are optional. Among other things, they are offered as a source of potential topics for your final paper.
  • For our first class meeting, please prepare the following:
    • Introduction; NANRL, xxv-xxvi
    • Land, Religion and Culture: Indians and the Land; NANRL, 3-10
    • Kelly Kunsch, A Legal Practitioners [sic] Guide to Indian and Tribal Law Research, 2 AMERICAN INDIAN L. J. 484 (2014); TWEN (S)
  • A note on preparation:
    • For those of you unfamiliar with federal Indian law, I recommend consulting William C. Canby, Jr’s American Indian Law in a Nutshell (6th ed. 2015). This excellent resource is highly regarded by attorneys and judges practicing in the field. You needn’t read it in its entirety before our first class, but you may find it useful to have perused at least the first four chapters.

top

International Environmental Law A (ENVL-340-A)

Professor Gonzalez

  • Required Texts
    1. Carlson, Palmer & Weston, International Environmental Law and World Order: A Problem-Oriented Coursebook (3rd ed. 2012).
    2. Carlson, Palmer & Weston, International Environmental Law and World Order: Supplement of Basic Documents (3rd ed. 2012).
  • Introduction to International Law. Textbook pages 1-33; 39-50; 54-77.
  • Anthony Anghie, The Evolution of International Law: Colonial and Postcolonial Realities (short article available on TWEN)

top

Introduction to Practice A (LPRC-100-A)

Professor Silverman

  • Please read Chapters 1-2 (pages 3-42) in Working Together in Law.

top

INTRODUCTION TO PRACTICE C (LPRC-100-C)

Professor John Weaver, Professor Rob Dickson, & Professor Gretchen Hoog

  • Welcome to Introduction to Legal Practice.
  • For our first class on Monday January 12, please read:
    • Pages 7-45 in ESSENTIAL LAWYERING SKILLS
    • Pages 3-65 in WORKING TOGETHER IN LAW
  • For the second class on Wednesday January 14, please read:
    • Pages 66-135 in WORKING TOGETHER IN LAW
  • A full syllabus will be posted by Sunday on the CANVAS page for this class.
  • You will be working in groups on many of the tasks in this class. By Tuesday morning (10:00 a.m.), we would like you to form pairs to work together. Send Professor Weaver your pairing choice and we will have further explanations at Wednesday's class.

top

Law and Economic Seminar A (JURS-335-A)

Professor Kirkwood

  • TEXT: Robert Cooter & Thomas Ulen, LAW & ECONOMICS (6th ed. 2012)
  • Read Pages 1 – 10 of the textbook.

top

Legal Writing II D (WRIT-200-D)

Professor Bannai

  • Welcome to this course!

    The first week of class, you'll be introduced to the case you'll be working on this semester, and we'll talk about preparing for the practice oral argument you'll be doing the second week of class. Before our first class, I'd suggest that you read Chapter 19 in the Legal Writing Handbook (Fifth Edition) for an introduction to oral advocacy. While we won't discuss that topic until Thursday, January 15, getting that reading done beforehand will be helpful, as there will be other reading I'm going ask you to do for the 15th, as well.

    In addition, be sure to register for the TWEN page associated with this class. I will use it to communicate with you throughout the semester.

    I'm looking forward to meeting you.

    Lori Bannai

top

Professional Responsibility A & E (PROF-200-A & PROF-200-E)

Professor Strait

  • Register for this class on TWEN.
  • Text: ETHICAL PROBLEMS IN THE PRACTICE OF LAW, 3RD ED. by Lerman and Schrag; Professional RESPONSIBILITY, STANDARDS, RULES AND STATUTES by Dzienkowski
  • Class 1, Tuesday, January 13
    • Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law, by Lerman and Schrag (hereafter LS) INTRODUCTION. pp. 1-13; CH. 1, THE REGULATION OF LAWYERS, pp. 19 – 45
    • Go to the CALI Folder on TWEN. Read the CALI Student Instructions sheet and follow them for submitting to my assistant at ljsleep@seattleu.edu.
    • --Do CALI exercise: Sources of Law Regulating the Practice of Law (1 hour) and submit a screen capture to the drop box per your CALI Student Instructions (above)
  • Class 2, Thursday, January 15
    • LS CH. 1, THE REGULATION OF LAWYERS, pp. 45 – 79, Admission to Practice
      • In Re Wright
      • Wright Jimi Petition
    • for class discussion:
      • WA Admission to Practice Rule (APR) 3 and
      • WA APR 21-24
      • Universal Bar Exam Application for Bar Examination
      • Application Instructions to the WA ST Bar and URL Link
      • Sample WA ST Bar Application Form

top

Property C (PROP-100-C)

Professor Slye

  1. Register with the TWEN course associated with the class. To register, go to lawschool.westlaw.com, and register for “Property C.” Course assignments, supplementary materials, and other materials related to the course will be posted on the TWEN site. In addition, you should feel free to use the discussion function to raise questions not raised in class, or to pursue in more depth issues only briefly raised in class.
  2. The Syllabus for the class is posted on the TWEN site.
  3. READING ASSIGNMENT
    • 13 January: 3 - 40
    • 15 January: 40-56; 56 – 83
    • For Thursday’s class, make sure you read and understand the materials on pages 40-56. I will not be questioning you directly on that material in class, but we will be discussing some of the concepts in those materials throughout much of the course.

top

Remedies E (REMD-300-E)

Professor Gordon

  • Class 1: Monday, January 12, 2015: Introductory Lecture: "Justice in the Real World: God's Work on Earth Must Truly be Our Own." Focus: The Rightful Position Principle. Casebook 1-18 (Includes Introduction plus U.S. v. Hatahley).
  • Class 2: Wednesday, January 14, 2015: Value as the Measure of the Rightful Position. Casebook:18-35 [Trinity Church; In Re September 11th – Twin Towers Litigation]
  • Problem No. 1 due Class 3.
  • Monday, January 19, 2015: No Class. Martin Luther King Day.

top

Torts B (TORT 105-B)

Professor Siegel

  • Monday, double class (Contracts and Torts class periods): pp. 375-407
  • Wednesday: pp. 407-430
  • Thursday: Review Exam (no reading)

top

Torts E (TORT-105-E)

Professor Gonzalez

  1. Compensatory Damages for Personal Injury
  2. Medical expenses: Pages 583-596
  3. Lost Earnings and Impairment of Earning Capacity: Pages 596-615
  4. Pain, Suffering and Other Intangibles: Pages 615-626
  • After we have completed the discussion of the readings on damages, every student will participate in a negotiating exercise based on Problem 36: pages 626-649. The class will be divided into teams of four students (two representing the plaintiff and two representing the defendant) that will conduct a negotiation in an attempt to settle the tort claim brought by Sidney Rothman against Tompkins Department Store. Each team will receive detailed instructions and a confidential information packet prior to the exercise. You will also need to re-read pages 148-158 on vicarious liability in order to prepare for this exercise.

top

Tribal Governmental Gaming A (INDL-330-A)

Professor Eberhard

  • Read and be prepared to discuss Chapters 1-6 in Indian Gaming Law & Policy by Rand and Light; read and be prepared to discuss Chapters 1-4 and 8 in Gaming Law in a Nutshell.

top

Trusts & Estates E (ESTA-300-E)

Professor John K. Eason

  • The reading assignments for the first week of class are set forth below. In total these two assignments are more reading than what will be typical for a week of class during the semester. These readings will undoubtedly take us into the second week of class.
  • Note the references to statutes (RCW’s). I will get to you by the end of the first week of class a comprehensive statutory supplement file. In the meantime, you can easily access the assigned provisions by following this link: http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?Cite=11
  • A TWEN site has been created for this course – please sign up. By the end of this week (i.e., by 1/9/15) you will find the cases noted in the second assignment posted on the TWEN site under the “Handouts” tab.
  • Topics (No. of class sessions)
    • A. Introduction (3)
    • General Introduction & Course Overview; Testamentary Freedom & the Dead Hand
      • Assignments
        • Read pp. 1-28 (to Hodel); First ¶ p. 30 (the §207 part); pp. 32-41
        • Read intro ¶’s each of Ch’s 2-12 + 15 (e.g., for Ch. 2, read p. 147 to end of 1st full ¶ on p. 148)
      • Notes, Statutes, etc.
        • RCW §§11.11.003; 11.12.190; 11.12.230; 11.20.010
    • Professional Responsibility; The Probate System; Probate and Nonprobate Property
      • Assignments
        • Ch. 1 pp. 41-52; 55-62; pp. 170-71 (Safeguarding); pp. 307-09 (Bequests & Appts)
        • Skim Letter & Will pp.981-83 & List of Assets & Liabilities pp. 986-89
        • Omit: SIMPSON
      • Notes, Statutes, etc.
        • RCW §§11.28.120; 11.40.020; 11.40.051; 11.40.70(3) & (4); 11.54.010; 11.62.005(1-2); 11.62.010; 11.68.011; 11.88.080
        • Skim: §§11.02.005; 11.04.250; 11.40.030-.040; 11.96A.040; 30A.04.260; 11.54.010
        • WA RPC’s §§1.6; 1.7; 1.8; 1.10; 1.14;
        • Add: PARKS V. FINK; STRANGELAND V. BROCK; FABIAN; WSBA Discipline Notice-Allen; (All on TWEN)

top

UCC Secured Transactions A (COMM-355-A)

Professor Dick

  • Below are the reading assignments for the first few weeks of the course. I reserve the right to modify the assignments from time to time, and to utilize additional handouts and materials. All assignments are from the required text unless otherwise noted. Problems are not assigned unless noted below, but you may want to read them as they are useful to enhance your understanding of the material. Where problems are included in the assignment, please be prepared to discuss them in class. On occasion, however, time may not permit such discussion. Your review and preparation of the problems will nevertheless be a helpful exercise.
  • Please note that all linked statutes that are not otherwise in your statutory supplement will be made available to you as a link on TWEN®. The Problems can be found at the end of your assigned readings.
  • 1/13 Introduction; Remedies of Unsecured Creditors under State Law
    • Textbook: Read pages 3-19.
    • Statutes: Read UCC §§1-101 through 1-103 (and Official Comments).
    • Problems: Complete Problems 1.1, 1.2 and 1.5.
  • 1/15 Security and Foreclosure
    • Textbook: Read pages 22-36.
    • Statutes: Familiarize yourself with the structure of UCC §1-201 through §1-206, UCC §9-101 and UCC §9-102 (and skim Official Comments). Please do not worry about mastering substance; read only to gain a sense of the layout of the UCC and where to find relevant definitions and rules of interpretation. Skim the Official Comments to gain a sense of the tone and depth of this explanatory material.
    • Problems: Complete Problems 2.1 and 2.2.
  • Required Text: Lynn M. LoPucki and Elizabeth Warren, Secured Credit: A Systems Approach (7th Edition) (2012)

top