Course Titles I - L

IMMIGRATION LAW (IMMG-300) 3 credits
Immigration is governed by a wide range of statutes, regulations, case law, and international treaties. This course critically examines the underpinnings as well as the substantive and procedural contents and policy implications of these various sources of immigration law. In particular, it focuses on the following aspects of immigration: admission, exclusion, deportation of noncitizens; the acquisition and loss of citizenship; the national security implications of immigration law, and state and federal laws regulating the presence of noncitizens often called "alienage laws." The course is also designed to teach basic skills in interpretation of complex statutes and administrative regulations.

No prerequisites.

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IMMIGRATION LAW CLINIC (IMMG-400) 3 credits
Students enrolled in the Immigration Clinic will provide legal representation to clients in immigration proceedings. Students will get involved at various stages of these proceedings, which may include proceedings before Immigration Officers, Immigration Courts, Board of Immigration Appeals, or Circuit Courts of Appeals. The primary responsibilities may include: interviewing clients in immigration custody, investigating facts, conducting legal research, preparing memoranda, motions and legal briefs, and conducting oral argument. The typical advocacy involves disputing the legal grounds for inadmissibility and/ or deportability, and seeking relief from deportation in the form of adjustment of status, cancellation of removal, asylum from persecution (because of race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or social group), and deferral of removal under the United Nations Convention Against Torture (CAT). Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules. Student teams must maintain office hours in the Clinic offices for a total of four hours a week spread over two days. The days and times for office hours will be determined based on each student team's schedule.

Prerequisite: Immigration Law (IMMG-300). Restriction: Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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INCARCERATED PARENTS ADVOCACY CLINIC (FAML-410) 6 credits
Students in this course will advocate for incarcerated parents who are seeking to preserve their relationships with their children despite their incarceration. Under the supervision of clinic faculty, students will represent incarcerated parents in dependency and other proceedings and work closely with clients and their families to develop plans for maintaining the parent-child relationship. Students will develop lawyering skills through interviewing and counseling clients, engaging in negotiations and trial preparation, including interviewing witnesses and drafting motions, and representing clients in court. In addition, students will work collectively on developing materials to assist parents in self-advocacy and to help lawyers handling such cases to be more effective.

Prerequisite: Evidence (EVID-200). Pre or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (PROF-200). Restrictions: Students must be Rule 9 eligible. Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules. Recommended: Poverty Law (POVL-300).
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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INDIAN LAW AND NATURAL RESOURCES (INDL-315) 2 credits
Indian tribes have traditionally relied upon the natural resources for their personal, economic, cultural and religious well-being. Although ownership and access to those resources has been reduced over time, Indian tribes continue to own, and have rights to, a wide range of natural resources. Tribal management of natural resources have, in some instances, become models of wise use, protection and enhancement. This course will explore the basis for tribal ownership of, and rights to, natural resources; the nature and extent of those rights today; tribal managements of those resources; the interface and conflicts among tribal, state and federal agencies over the use and management of these resources; and the implication of selected federal statutes. Guest speakers will give presentations over the course of the semester. A paper will be required in lieu of a final exam.

No prerequisites.

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INDIAN TRUSTS AND ESTATES CLINIC (INDL-401) 4 credits
This three credit integrative clinic is open to students who have taken, or are currently enrolled in, the Trusts and Estates course. Students work in teams of two and will represent a low-income Native American person in an estate planning matter involving both their personal property and their interests in federal trust lands in the preparation of wills, powers of attorney, and health care directives. Student instruction is held in conjunction with the Trust and Estates Clinic students, with breakout sessions covering the Federal Law and Tribal Probate Codes that govern the estate of the Native American client. In addition, student teams must maintain office hours in the Clinic offices for a total of four hours per week. Office hours must be scheduled on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday between 1 and 8 p.m. This clinic is available as an evening clinic.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Trusts and Estates (ESTA-300). Restriction: Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules. Recommended but not required: Federal Indian Law (INDL-300).
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX (TAXL-300) 4 credits
This course covers the basic concepts, rules, and policy choices involved in the Federal income tax system, including the concepts of gross income, exclusions from income, timing of receipt and recognition of income, deductions, gains and losses from the sale of property, and the basis of computing tax liability. Most other tax courses, as well as courses on pensions and employee benefits, build on the concepts learned in Individual Income Tax.

No prerequisites.

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INFORMATION PRIVACY (INTP-375) 2 credits
This course examines laws that protect personal information, with a focus on how these laws change with emerging technologies. The first part of the course examines the philosophical and historical roots of privacy law, as well as the Constitutional limitations on the ability of government to investigate matters traditionally considered private. We will also review common law torts, such as invasion of privacy and breach of confidentiality. A portion of the course will consist of an examination of the various federal statutes that protect privacy, such as the Fair Credit Reporting Act; the Privacy Act; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act; the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act; and the Family Rights and Educational Privacy Act. Additionally, we will discuss challenges to privacy in a high tech society, examining how the law, businesses, and consumers respond to issues created by data breaches, identity theft, and data sharing in the Internet marketplace. We will also discuss how other industrial countries have regulated information sharing, focusing on the European Union's Data Protection Directive.

No prerequisites.

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INSURANCE LAW (INSU-300) 2 credits
The Insurance Law course is an overview of insurance fundamentals-the nature of insurance, its purposes and functions in commerce, and its functions in and effects on tort litigation and recovery. In addressing these fundamentals, the class learns about the insurance contract, its structure, its interpretation, and its use.

No prerequisites.

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INSURANCE LAW: BAD FAITH AND FAIR CONDUCT (INSU-325) 3 credits
This course will focus on issues related to the doctrine of bad faith in the context of insurance litigation. The course will include an examination of the development of Washington's bad faith law and the creation of the Insurance Fair Conduct Act, which was passed in 2007 and has become a major feature of litigation practice. Students will hear from policymakers involved in the Act's passage and implementation and will be required to complete a series of litigation-focused exercises and assignments.

The course does not assume any background in Insurance Law. Students who have taken or are taking the Insurance Law course may also enroll in this course.

No prerequisites.

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (INTP-300) 3 credits
This survey course covers the basic statutes and doctrines undergirding the three major federal forms of intellectual property: trademarks and unfair competition, copyrights, and patents. It also touches upon state law doctrines such as right of publicity, misappropriation, trade secrets, state trademark law, and other forms of unfair competition. Relying on a combination of cases and problems, students will develop a familiarity with the foundational principles of intellectual property law and practice.

No prerequisites.

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LICENSING LAB (INTP-301) 1 credit
This course will cover the drafting and negotiating of license agreements and other types of agreements pertinent to the management, development, and marketing of various forms of intellectual property. This course must be taken pass/fail.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: One or more of the following: Copyright Law (INTP-320); Intellectual Property (INTP-300); Intellectual Property Licensing Law (INTP-310); or Trademark Law (INTP-315).
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LICENSING LAW (INTP-310) 2 credits
Introduction to the role of intellectual property licensing in the context of business strategy. The course examines the business and legal criteria for building and maintaining a successful licensing program. Subject areas covered include business objectives of licensing, portfolio analysis, types of licenses, terms and conditions in contracts, antitrust constraints, offensive and defensive negotiation strategies, and international factors. Classes will utilize sample IP portfolios, work in groups for mock negotiations, and discuss relevant case law and regulation.

No prerequisites.

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INTELLECTUAL PROPRETY PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (INTP-392) 3 credits
This course focuses on the day-to-day intellectual property issues faced by innovation companies (i.e., technology, pharmaceutical, biomedical, media and entertainment companies) in managing and growing their portfolios of patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets. This course will cover the substantive law and practical issues involved in topics such as: setting up and maintaining "safe harbors" from copyright infringement liability for web-based enterprises; the establishment of a patent program; managing trade secrets; intellectual property due diligence for mergers, acquisitions and strategic alliances; managing open source software; peer-to-peer data transfers across the internet; re-broadcast of audio-visual works via streaming technologies; and other commonly encountered intellectual property related business issues.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Two or more of the following: Copyright Law (INTP-320); Intellectual Property (INTP-300); Patent Law (INTP-305); Trademark Law (INTP-315); or Intellectual Property: Law, Society and Technology (INTP-150).

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INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION (INTL-330) 3 credits
If you look at the world's arbitration scorecard today, you will likely see a $28 billion dispute in London between the Russian Federation and private investors; a $ 27 billion dispute in New York between Chevron Texaco and Ecuador; a $1 billion dispute in Geneva between Nigerian National Petroleum and Gulf Petro Trading, etc. The diversity of the parties coupled with the scale and complexity of the transactions make the resolution of disputes through arbitration more attractive than domestic court litigation. While arbitration does not completely displace court litigation, it is now the principal means of the resolution of transnational disputes. This course first looks at the challenges associated with court litigation when the party-litigants are from different jurisdictions and cultures, and then provides an overview of the applicable laws and treaties in international arbitration. It highlights the difficulties associated with cultural diversity in the arbitral process by profiling some of the world's leading arbitral centers. It finally offers a comparative look at problems of enforcement of arbitral awards in selected jurisdictions. At the end of the course, student will be able to see that arbitration is not an alternative means of resolution of translation disputes, it is the principal means, and that lack of familiarity with the basic tenants of this system would be a gap in any lawyer's knowledge operating in today's global marketplace.

No prerequisites.

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INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION PRACTICE (INTL-377) 2 credits
Formerly titled: ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL COMMERICIAL ARBITRATION

As the globalization of business advances, more commercial disputes are resolved through international arbitration. Indeed, the neutrality and procedural flexibility of international arbitration is, in some cases, essential to conducting international commerce.

This course will immerse students in the subject through a structured simulation of practice in the field of international commercial arbitration. Students will undergo an orientation as associates in a mock law firm, and then move through the stages of a hypothetical international arbitration: from drafting an effective arbitration clause to enforcing or challenging an arbitral award.

As mock associates, students will be expected to analyze statutes and rules, research and draft memoranda and arbitral submissions, advocate orally on issues arising in international commercial arbitration, and submit weekly timesheets. The course will thus emphasize writing and advocacy to develop an understanding of the customary practice of international commercial arbitration. In this way, the course hopes to give students the experience of being a law firm associate practicing in the field.

No prerequisites.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS (BUSN-320) 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the issues that are likely to arise when clients engage in business abroad. The course begins with the most straightforward of international transactions, the international sale of goods (and the financing of such sales), and then turns to transactions involving greater and greater contact with a foreign county, including franchises, distributorships, licensing, and direct investment through joint ventures and wholly-owned subsidiaries. In examining each transaction, we necessarily draw on several areas of the law, including, among other things, contracts, antitrust, conflicts, labor law, business entities, and dispute resolution.

Recommended but not required: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW (CRIM-380) 3 credits
This course will cover: the nature and sources of international criminal law; the responsibilities of individuals, states, and others; alternatives to criminal prosecution; defenses; issues of state jurisdiction and fora; extradition and other means of obtaining personal jurisdiction; international cooperative enforcement; international tribunals from Nuremberg to former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and the Permanent International Criminal Tribunal; and a selection of specific international crimes (e.g., war crimes, crimes against humanity, human rights abuses, and drug trafficking).

Additionally, there will be a strong emphasis on the context(s) in which international criminal justice is meted out. In many cases, states that have experienced serious international criminal violations are also states in transition from one regime to another. The social, economic, and political stability of these regimes heavily impacts upon the demands and priorities of such regimes. This in turn impacts upon their ability to deliver criminal justice. There will also be an attempt to situate the demands for criminal justice alongside the broader set of demands for justice that exist in such societies. By paying attention to this context, it is hoped that the student will have a richer and deeper understanding of the many obstacles set in the way of achieving international criminal justice.

No prerequisites.

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INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (ENVL-340) 3 credits
This course is an introduction to the role of international law in environmental protection and to a range of issues raised by humankind's ecological impacts. The course begins with an overview of international law and then analyzes and critiques the legal regimes that have developed to address specific environmental crises. Among the crises addressed in the course are global warming, species extinction, destruction of rain forests, and global trade in hazardous waste. Special attention is devoted to the "North-South" conflict over responsibility for environmental protection and to the relationship between environmental protection and trade liberalization. Public International Law is recommended but not required.

Recommended but not required: Public International Law (INTL-300) or International Law (INTL-150).

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INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CLINIC (INTL-402) 4 credits
The International Human Rights Clinic offers students the opportunity to work with foreign and domestic clients before international and regional human rights bodies. Students will also collaborate with human rights organizations on research and advocacy projects. Furthermore, there may be opportunities to work on cases filed in U.S. courts that incorporate elements of international law.
In addition to project work, the course has a seminar component that presents knowledge and skills essential for lawyers in this dynamic field. The interactive approach covers relevant legal principles, theory, and case law, and--on the pragmatic side--features in-class exercises designed to hone critical skills. The International Human Rights Clinic is a graded course with a substantial time commitment; it may not be taken pass/fail.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: At least one of the following: International Criminal Law (CRIM-380); International Environmental Law (ENVL-340); International Humanitarian Law (INTL-370); International Law (INTL-150); International Law of Human Rights (INTL-305); or Public International Law (INTL-300); or previous coursework in human rights with instructor approval. Restriction: Must meet conflicts of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (INTP-345) 2 credits
This course covers both public and private sources of international intellectual property law and policy, including copyright, patents, trademarks, geographical indications, unfair competition, trade secrets, traditional knowledge and protection of plant genetic resources. The public component will include multilateral agreements such as the Berne Convention, the Paris Convention, and TRIPS-as well as some regional agreements such as European Union directives and regulations. We will trace how these agreements are administered through the major international institutions such as the World Intellectual Property Organization and the World Trade Organization, which in turn impact the shape of national laws and the direction of international harmonization. On the private side, we will cover briefly choice of forum, choice of law and other problems related to private transactions and enforcement. We will cover major U.S. intellectual property law concepts before discussing comparable rules in the assigned cases, whether those rules are derived from international treaties or from other countries' national laws. Relying on a combination of cases and problems, students will develop a familiarity with the foundational principles and challenges of international intellectual property law and practice, and be sensitive to the development policy components of intellectual property in the context of global trade. Special emphasis will be placed throughout on the public interest and social justice calculus involving intellectual property-protected knowledge goods.

Recommended but not required: Intellectual Property (INTP-300) and Public International Law (INTL-300).

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INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT LAW (INTL-322) 3 credits
This course examines the role of law in regulating foreign investment. It begins by discussing foreign investment in developing countries from both a historical and theoretical perspective and places foreign investment in the broader context of economic ‘globalisation.' It then examines the motivations and concerns of a particular host country and the foreign investor as they respectively consider opening the doors to investment and investing abroad.

The course will then examine four forms of law which constitute the legal architecture of investment regulation - the ‘law' of the market and laws of contract, property and business associations required by investors; the national law created by domestic legislatures and other law-making bodies to regulate investment; the economic law created through multilateral, plurilateral, regional and bilateral treaties; and finally the different kinds of law and policy emanating from global institutions such as the WTO, World Bank and international dispute resolution systems.

There are no prerequisites for the class, although some knowledge of international law will be helpful. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation and a research paper due at the end of the semester.

The required text for the course is M. Sornarajah, The International Law on Foreign Investment (3d ed. 2010). Additional articles, cases, and texts will be assigned throughout.

No prerequisites.

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INTERNATIONAL LAW OF HUMAN RIGHTS (INTL-305) 3 credits
This class will provide a comprehensive overview of the development of modern international human rights law, including the theory, institutions, practice, and procedures of the current human rights regime. The class will look at the various regional and international human rights regimes, as well as the use of international human rights law in domestic courts, particularly in the U.S. We will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the various procedures open to an international human rights lawyer, and discuss contemporary efforts to strengthen the enforcement of international human rights laws. Some of the questions we will discuss are: What are the most effective mechanisms for addressing current human rights abuses? What are the most effective mechanisms for providing relief to a victim of human rights violations? What is the relevance of international human rights law to domestic U.S. litigation?

No prerequisites.

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INTERNATIONAL TAXATION (TAXL-330) 3 credits
This course will cover outbound (foreign income of U.S. persons and entities) and inbound (U.S. income of foreign persons and entities) aspects of U.S. taxation. The course will focus primarily on the U.S. tax system, but will devote some attention to adjustments made between tax regimes of different countries through tax credits and tax treaties.

Prerequisite: Individual Income Tax (TAXL-300).

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INTERNATIONAL TRADE (INTL-340) 3 credits
This course will examine the international trade regime created by the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and the World Trade Organization and various regional agreements, such as NAFTA and the European Union. The course will also examine aspects of U.S. trade law.

No prerequisites.

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INTERNATIONAL TRADE II (INTL-342) 3 credits
The course is a continuation of International Trade. It will explore certain topics and issues currently at issue in the World Trade Organization jurisprudence in greater depth and will spend more time on U.S. trade law and regional and bi-lateral agreements, subjects that were only lightly touched on in the introductory course.

Meeting Notes for the Spring 2014 Section: Two or three of the class sessions will be co-taught by Rufus Yerxa. Professor Yerxa, an alumnus of the law school, just completed 12 years as Deputy Director General of the World Trade Organization. On the mornings that Professor Yerxa is teaching, class will start at 8:00 a.m. and run until 9:45. This will enable us to take maximum advantage of his expertise.

Prerequisite: International Trade (INTL-340) or equivalent as determined by the professor.

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INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY THROUGH VIDEO GAMES AND VIRTUAL WORLDS (INTP-300) 3 credits
This course will introduce students to the concepts and areas of federal and state intellectual property law in the context of the video game industry. The areas of intellectual property discussed will include the law of copyright, patent, trademarks, trade secrets, advertising, the right of publicity and unfair competition. The student will become acquainted with the entire process of developing and commercializing a modern video game. In addition to introducing the statutory and common law frameworks and basic doctrines of intellectual property law, the course will also cover various legal tasks faced by lawyers advising game developers, such as the acquisition of intellectual property assets for video game development, including cinematic and music licensing, the law governing software and video game licensing to end users, and legal issues concerning the construction of game devices and interoperable hardware consoles. The law governing gaming in virtual worlds will also be covered. The cases assigned will focus mainly on disputes involving familiar hardware names and game titles.

Restrictions: Students who have received credit for Intellectual Property (INTP-300) may not receive credit for this course.

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JURISPRUDENCE AND LEGAL THEORY (JURS-300) 3 credits
This course is an introductory course in jurisprudence and the philosophy of law. No prior knowledge of jurisprudence, legal theory or philosophy will be assumed. Students will be introduced to a variety of jurisprudential schools with differing theoretical approaches to understanding law, including natural law, natural rights theory, legal positivism, Marxism, historicism, neo-Kantian formalism, American and Scandinavian realism, the sociology of law, liberal legalism, legal pragmatism, critical legal studies, critical race theory, feminist legal theory, and postmodern theories of law. The course is organized to trace the history of philosophical and critical reflection on the nature of law, situating law within or after the grand narratives of the Western tradition-Nature, God, Reason, History, etc.--while thematizing certain recurrent issues such as the relationship between law and morality, the nature of justice, whether law is autonomous or a mere reflection of the interests of social and economic elites, the nature of the legal subject, the relation of law to politics, and the nature of legal rights. Grading will be based on four or five short papers written over the course of the semester.

No prerequisites.

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JUVENILE JUSTICE (CRIM-335) 2 credits
This course examines the American approach to juvenile justice, with a special focus on policies and procedures in the state of Washington. Students will learn about the history and evolution of a separate system for juveniles while also examining the contrasts and interactions with the criminal justice system and other child-serving systems, such as child welfare courts. Considerable attention will be paid to issues of racial disparity and other matters , such as recent findings regarding brain development, that inform current debates in the field.

No prerequisites.

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LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT DISPUTE RESOLUTION (EMPL-335) 3 credits
This course will approach selected labor and employment law subjects through role plays in which students will act as advocates, negotiators, and counselors. The course will introduce students to a wide range of dispute resolution processes commonly employed in labor and employment practice (e.g., mediation, arbitration, collective bargaining).

Prerequisite: One of the following - Employment Law (EMPL-300); Employment Discrimination (EMPL-315); Labor Law, Private Sector (EMPL-305); Labor Law, Public Sector (EMPL-310) or Labor Law (EMPL-350).

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LABOR LAW (EMPL-350) 3 credits
This course explores the law governing employees' collective action in the workplace, and covers topics including: union organizing; the establishment of the collective bargaining relationship; primary and secondary economic pressures (strikes, boycotts, etc.); the administration of collective bargaining agreements; and union democracy. Although much of the course material will focus on the law applicable to private-sector workers and employers, the course will also discuss some of the ways in which public sector workers are treated differently than their private-sector counterparts. Additionally, the course will cover constitutionally-imposed limits on labor activity in the public sector.

Recommended but not required: Administrative Law (ADMN-300).

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LAND USE REGULATION (PROP-315) 3 credits
A study of the public land use planning process and such regulatory techniques as zoning, subdivision regulation, growth management, planned unit development, shoreline management, and environmental impact analysis. Attention will be given to both the procedure and substance of legal controls, the problem of administrative discretion and legal accountability, coordination of land use policies and controls within and among different units of government, the interrelated roles of planner and lawyer, and emerging methods of land use control.

No prerequisites. Restriction: Students may not receive credit for both Land Use Regulation and Land Use: Washington Law & Practice (ENVL-307).

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LAND USE: WASHINGTON LAW AND PRACTICE (ENVL-307) 2 credits
This course provides an overview of land use policy and practice using Washington law as an example. After a brief introduction to the national and historical context for the contemporary "smart growth" movement, the course will explore Washington's statutory land use planning and permitting framework, how that framework drives local development regulations, and how property owners must navigate those regulations. Among the elements of the framework are the Growth Management Act, the Shoreline Management Act, the Land Use Petition Act, subdivision and impact fee statutes, and constitutional limitations on government property regulation. Throughout the course, students will analyze examples of land use issues arising in contemporary news coverage and discuss how policy and political considerations help shape the regulatory framework that, in turns, helps shape the physical landscapes around us.

No Prerequisites. Restriction: Students may not receive credit for both Land Use: Washington Law & Practice and Land Use Regulation (PROP-315).

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LANDLORD/TENANT LAW (POVL-350 ) 2 credits
The class will focus on the landlord-tenant relationship including common law principles, the Residential Landlord Tenant Act, and the Unlawful Detainer Process. The class will also deal with public housing, the Fair Housing Act, and the American with Disabilities Act. Finally, the class will look at the interaction of housing law and the Fair Credit Reporting Act and Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

No prerequisites.

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LATINOS AND THE LAW (JURS-380) 2 or 3 credits
Incorporating insights from history, social science, popular culture, political science, and critical race theory, this course is open to anyone interested in understanding or serving the legal needs of the Latino population, now nearly one out of six Americans and one out of ten Washingtonians.
During the semester we will cover a number of issues associated with this fast-growing group that connect to a number of bar-tested subjects such as property, contracts, torts, criminal procedure, and constitutional law. Class discussions will emphasize creative and compassionate solutions to daunting policy issues such as immigration limits, affirmative action, and the role of states in immigration enforcement. Grading will be based on a student paper relating to the course themes, as well as class participation.
Topics:

  • Latino histories, including Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cuban Americans;
  • criminal justice system;
  • immigration policies and histories;
  • housing policy and the subprime mortgage crisis;
  • Spanish language rights;
  • public education and affirmative action;
  • cultural stereotypes and hate speech;
  • workplace discrimination;
  • the role of politics;
  • and rebellious lawyering for social justice.

No prerequisites.

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LAW AND BUSINESS OF ART AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (INTP-385) 2 credits
This course will examine legal doctrines as they relate to works of visual art and objects of cultural heritage.  The course will begin with an exploration of intellectual property rights applicable to visual art with a particular focus on artists' moral rights.  It will also examine the business of art and study the legal aspects of transactions in fine art and cultural objects, considering perspectives of auction houses, dealers, artists, collectors, museums and source countries. The course will study questions of authenticity in works of visual art and the ways in which the legal system has responded to problems of artwork forgeries.  It will also address questions of title to works of art, with a particular focus on World War II looted artworks and policy issues affecting the outcome of title claims.  The course will examine key legislation and case law affecting the movement of and market in objects of cultural heritage, including the role of museums in the debate over cultural patrimony.  The course will require informed student participation and student-led discussions.  Grading will be based on one or more writing assignments or drafting exercises as well as class participation. 

No prerequisites.

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LAW AND ECONOMICS SEMINAR (JURS-335) 3 credits
The goal of this course is to teach you to apply economic analysis to legal and policy issues. The course has three distinct but overlapping parts. First, you'll study the basic principles of neoclassical microeconomics along with some newer ideas from game theory and behavioral economics. Second, you'll apply these analytical tools to areas of common law (like property and torts) and legal practice (like settlement negotiations). Finally, you'll pair up with another student and write a paper on a legal or policy issue of your choice. That will involve preparing an outline, producing a discussion draft, presenting and defending that draft in class, and submitting a final version that responds to the comments you received. Your grade will be based on your draft, your presentation and defense of it, and your final paper.

No prerequisites.

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LAW AND RELIGION (JURS-365) 3 credits
This course is designed to develop familiarity with the major tenets of the First Amendment's religion clauses. Class time will be structured around in-depth engagement of Supreme Court precedent, and will seek to integrate these formative decisions into the social and historical contexts from which they derive meaning. In addition, the course will survey the scholarly treatment of such threshold questions as the meaning of "religion" in society, and will evaluate the evolving notion of religious liberty in a pluralistic society.

No prerequisites.

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LAW AND SEXUALITY (JURS-340) 3 credits
This interdisciplinary course will examine the complex relationship between law and sexuality. Topics will include law and its relationship to the social construction of sexuality and identity; law and the construction of acceptable private and public expressions of sexuality; law, sexuality, and parenting; and law, sexuality, and violence. Course materials will include cases, law review articles, literature from social sciences and gender studies, and assorted essays and fiction.

No prerequisites.

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LAW AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (JURS-387) 3 credits
This course will critically examine the relationship between law and social movements, specifically engaging texts and materials that interrogate law's role in both criminalizing and co-opting social movements. Often in the legal profession and in legal academia, as well as in popular culture, we hear of the relationship between law and social movements primarily in terms of the use of legal strategies such as litigation and policy reform to secure rights and freedoms for oppressed and excluded groups. Many people come to law school with the aim of utilizing legal skills to support and bolster the equality claims of marginalized populations. The materials used in this course will problematize the assumption that the primary role of law with regard to social movements is to support emancipatory progress. We will instead take the opportunity to look broadly at the meanings of key concepts such as discrimination, freedom, liberation, power, governance, and violence as they relate to the stories that lawyers, movement activists, governments, and the media tell about the role of law in movements for social change. Our examination will engage "law" beyond strictly jurisprudence and look at the construction of legality and illegality with regard to dissent. Our inquiry will aim to cultivate deeper understandings of the current parameters and possibilities within social movements given the incentives and disincentives provided by various technologies of legal intervention over the past half century.

No prerequisites.

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LAW AND THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY METROPOLIS (GOVT-335) 3 credits
In the 21st century, contiguous densely populated metropolitan areas are highly decentralized in governance, with multiple cities, special districts and central authorities providing infrastructure and services to an area often generally referred to by a single city's name, e.g., Seattle. Such areas have immense impact on the nation, with over 75% of US GDP produced on less that 15% of US land area, but have no legal status. This course will provide an in-depth analysis of the legal framework in which 21st Century metropolises operate and are governed, focusing on services and infrastructure provided directly or regulated by local government. Within the constitution and laws of the State of Washington, students will develop an understanding of the law pertaining to housing and transit/mobility services in the Puget Sound region and the multiple layers of government with regulatory authority over these services. Students will develop research in one of these areas, using current innovations such as ridesharing services and micro-housing as platforms for analysis, and present a paper illustrating an understanding of the challenges presented to rational service delivery by the decentralized legal framework and identifying incentives and disincentives to centralization of these services and regulatory authorities.

No prerequisites.

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LAW FIRM BUSINESS PLANNING (LPRC-320) 1 credit
This one-credit course is a companion course to the Business Planning course taught at the Albers School of Business (SU's Business School) MGMT-586. The two courses must be taken together. Students will be expected to develop a plan for a law firm or law-related business. The Albers component will cover the various considerations that go into successful business planning. The Law School component will complement those discussions with a richer appreciation for the practical and ethical elements of developing a business within the legal profession.

The Albers course will meet weekly (for three hours) throughout the Winter Quarter. The Law School component will meet weekly (for one hour) throughout the Spring Semester. The Albers course meets on Wednesday.

Because law school enrollment occurs before enrollment at the business school, registration for this course is contingent upon successful enrollment in the Albers component. If a student fails to enroll in the Albers course, s/he will need to drop from the law school course.

Recommended but not required: undergraduate or graduate level accounting coursework or Accounting for Lawyers (LPRC-315). Restriction: Companion class to Albers School of Business Class MGMT-586. Students registering for LPRC-320 must also cross register for MGMT-586 through the Albers School of Business.

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LAW, LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (JURS-345) 3 credits
This course examines the ways in which language lies at the heart of the law and, thus, of lawyering. For its inquiry, the course borrows from literature and literary criticism, rhetoric, linguistics, and jurisprudence. Early in the course, this inquiry should help you think about how legal language creates meaning. As the course unfolds, you will also think about how the language of the law contributes to, or determines, our sense of legal culture, our sense of community, and our sense of self. Ultimately, we will look at the relationship between law and justice. The course uses Herman Melville's Billy Budd to begin its inquiry. Topics that follow include the relationship between language and meaning in statutory interpretation and judicial decision-making; narratives in the law; law, language, and metaphors; the nature of legal rules; the nature of legal argument and its relationship to justice; and the relationship between legal language, legal professionalism, and ethics. Students will read and discuss a number of law-related literary works, including essays, short stories, novels, and plays. The format for the course is that of a graduate seminar. Students will read selected materials, participate in class discussion, and write several short and medium-length papers.

No prerequisites.

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LAW, POLICY AND MENTAL HEALTH (MENT-300) 3 credits
This course explores the evolution of society's response to the mentally ill in the civil and criminal justice systems. The focus is on both law and policy, as the two are often intertwined. The course begins with the civil commitment system and its relationship with the mentally ill. That relationship raises policy, fiscal, and constitutional issues. The criminal justice system and its relationship with the mentally ill adds another layer of complexity with the concept of "criminal" commitment. This includes both competency to stand trial and mental status defenses such as insanity. The course concludes by examining current attempts to synthesize the civil and criminal justice systems. These attempts include the concept of therapeutic justice and mental health courts, and other policy-based potential statutory and non-statutory programs designed to protect public safety and help the mentally ill move from jails to clean and sober housing and treatment.

We will cover a select number of topics in greater detail, to provide depth; we will cover the rest of the material more generally, to provide breadth. Owing to the nature of the subject matter, students can expect to be exposed to both legal and policy-based doctrine.

For each major topic area, students will attempt to answer three key questions: how does society define the public interest involved, how does one determine whether an individual poses a risk to that public interest, and what happens or should happen if he or she does fall within that definition of risk?

No prerequisites.

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LAW PRACTICE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT (LPRC-500) 1 credit
In this course, students will address the ethical, professional, personal, and business dimensions of beginning a law practice. Among the topics to be covered are billing, marketing, communication with clients, and identifying viable business opportunities. Students will be expected to prepare an executive summary of a plan for a solo or small firm practice. Students will have the opportunity to meet with a number of practitioners with experience addressing each of the many issues presented in the course.

No prerequisites.

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LEGAL RESEARCH SKILLS: FREE SOURCES (LRES-500) 1 credit
The purpose of this class is to teach skills and resources necessary to perform legal research at no cost. Students will be taught essential concepts and methodologies for efficiently locating primary and secondary materials on sources other than Lexis and Westlaw. The class will introduce particular high-quality free services, teach the search syntax necessary for using these systems, and discuss methods to circumvent known problems in free research (lack of citators, few traditional secondary sources, limited natural language searching, etc.). Standard categories of legal research will be covered, including secondary sources, forms and practice materials, case law, and legislative and administrative materials.

No prerequisites.
Restrictions: Must be taken pass/fail.

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LEGAL RESEARCH STRATEGY AND SOURCES (LRES-500) 1 credit
This short course is designed to build on students' existing research skills. It will discuss issues surrounding research and strategies for finding the applicable law. It will cover the availability, capabilities and limitations of several free resources. It will also cover advanced techniques for searching commercial databases as well as free databases.

No prerequisites.
Restrictions: Must be taken pass/fail. Students who completed Legal Research Skills: Free Sources (LRES-500 - Offered January 2013 & 2014) are not eligible to register for this course. 

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LEGAL WRITING II: WRITTEN AND ORAL ADVOCACY (WRIT-200) 3 credits
This course must be taken during the second year. In Legal Writing II, students learn how to research and write trial and appellate briefs and how to present oral arguments to trial and appellate courts. Students learn these skills by working on a real case, usually a criminal case. At the beginning of the semester, students are given a copy of the case file. Using the information contained in this file, they research and write a brief in support of or in opposition to a pre-trial motion and then argue the motion to their professor, who plays the part of the trial judge. After the motion has been decided, the students are given a copy of the trial record, which they learn to review. Once students have identified the issues on appeal, they then research and write an appellate brief. At the end of the semester, students deliver a twenty-minute oral argument to three practicing attorneys who play the role of appellate judges.

Prerequisite: Legal Writing I: Research, Analysis, and Writing (WRIT-100 and WRIT-105).
This required Course must be taken in fall or spring semester of the second year.

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LEGISLATIVE SEMINAR (GOVT-315) 3 credits
Goals of the Legislative Seminar are to understand the process of how statutes are adopted in a state legislature (how a bill really becomes a law), how to research Washington statutes, and how statutes interrelate with the common law. From a practical standpoint, the course is geared not only for the prospective lobbyist/legislative staff attorney/legislator, but also for practicing attorneys who may seek statutory changes or for citizens or activists interested in improving the law in the public interest. At least one Saturday session will be held in Olympia during the legislative session. As a substitute for some class meetings, students will undertake individual (or small group projects) in Olympia following legislation as advocate (proponent or opponent) or as analyst. Oral presentations and papers on projects required. No final exam. Class participation considered.

No prerequisites.

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Student studying in the Law Library