Course Offerings Spring 2012 - Present Course Titles M - Q


MASS MEDIA LAW AND POLICY (JURS-352) 3 credits
In this survey course, we will examine the law and regulation of electronic and print media. Newspaper, broadcast, radio, cable television, telephony (including wireless), music, and movies will be discussed in the context of exploring the constitutional, statutory, public and private regulation of media. This course will grow understanding of concepts such as freedom of speech and press, defamation, obscenity, indecency, privacy, and how those concepts apply in the media context.

We will also contend with the pros and cons of media consolidation into the hands of fewer enterprises as we discuss the Federal Communications Commission, and its policies and processes of airwave allocation, licensing and licensing renewal, and using the NBC/Comcast merger as a case vehicle, examine media cross-ownership. This class will also emphasize the role that private actors play in media regulation through discussions about the Motion Picture Association of America, the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, or the National Cable Television Association.

This course will also include modules to more deeply explore relevant social and political policy and media: 1) media and political speech, and; 2) media and cultural representations (discussing, for example, the evolution of the presentation of African-Americans in television, the presentation of gender in music video, and the evolution of gay and lesbian representation in film in the context of civil rights laws and FCC "public interest" policies). Classroom discussion will aim to be highly interactive. To that end, students will be individually called upon to illuminate assigned readings. In addition, students will engage in small group assignments in which, for example, they will illuminate legal and policy issues in the role of FCC Commissioners or advocates before the FCC. Evaluation will be based upon class participation, group and individual assignments, and a final paper.

No prerequisites.

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MEDIATION CLINIC (ALDR-410) 3 credits
The Mediation Clinic offers students the opportunity to delve deeply into the theory and practice of mediation by serving as co-mediator in employment discrimination cases. The class will be comprised of a classroom component and a casework component. In the classroom component, students will explore and develop the skills necessary to serve as mediators and will participate in a series of mock mediation sessions. In the casework component, students will observe, prepare for and co-mediate (with faculty support) actual employment discrimination cases. Students will also be required to engage in on-going debriefing sessions, to keep a journal of their observations and experiences, and to submit their journal to the instructor. The EEOC schedules its mediations for an 8-hour period. Any particular mediation may take less or more than this.

Prerequisites: One or more of the following: Mediation, Mediation Advocacy, and Collaborative Law (ALDR-302); A 40-hour mediation training provided by an organization approved by the Professor; Education, training, and work experience equivalent to either (1) or (2) as determined by the Professor. Restrictions: Students must meet the clinic's conflict of interest rules. Meeting notes: Students will be required to observe a mediation and to participate in a second mediation. Each of these mediations will be scheduled for a full day.This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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MEDIATION, MEDIATION ADVOCACY, AND COLLABORATIVE LAW (ALDR-302) 3 credits
This course covers the practical skills and theoretical knowledge base that are fundamental to representing clients in mediation and to serving as mediators. Such topics include, for example, the components of the mediation process, intake, reframing and other active listening skills, negotiation dynamics, dealing with strong emotions, issues of culture and power, caucus, ethics, techniques for overcoming obstacles and achieving settlement, achieving durability of agreements and closure, and effective advocacy in mediation. Once students become strongly grounded in these fundamentals and skills, at the end of the semester we study how advocates might use many of these mediation and problem-solving skills in a creative new manner of representing clients in settlement negotiations called Collaborative Law. Once a week, the sections of the course meet together to discuss assignments and to observe and to critique skills demonstrations. Later in the week, each section meets in a Lab setting, which provides in-depth practice of mediation skills in a small, supportive environment. Students are graded on a final exam and class participation, which includes such things as class contributions and participation in simulated role plays and self-reflection. There are no prerequisites for the course, but Client Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiations is a very helpful introduction to some of the skills taught. This course meets the law school's requirement of a professional skills development course. It is also a prerequisite for the Mediation Clinic.

No prerequisites.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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MEDICAL LIABILITY (HLTH-420) 3 credits
The course will examine history, policy, and practice related to liability for medical error. In addition to the doctrines of informed consent and duty-to-treat, students will address many of the practical challenges involved in determining liability of individual providers and healthcare institutions. The course will also look at recent proposals, including some that have been enacted, for health-care-related tort reform.

No prerequisites.

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MENTAL HEALTH COURT CLINIC (MENT-400-A ) 3 credits
Students in the Mental Health Court Clinic will represent clients in one of the nation's first and most successful courts designed specifically to address the needs of mentally-ill individuals charged with crime. Participating in this pioneering approach to these difficult cases as part of the defense team run by the Association of Counsel for the Accused (a King County public defense firm), students will interview and counsel clients, participate in multi-disciplinary team meetings at the court, and advocate for clients in treatment reviews and competency hearings. Students with questions about the Mental Health Court Clinic may contact Professor Kurth at kurthr@seattleu.edu, russell.kurth@acapd.org, or 206-679-0941.

Restrictions: Must meet conflicts of interest rules. Must be Rule 9 eligible. Recommended but not required: Law, Policy & Mental Health (MENT-300); Client Counseling & Negotiation (ALDR-301). Meeting Notes: Students will need to have daytime availability to be present at court. Students must attend an all-day training session on a Friday early in the semester.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS (BUSN-305) 3 credits
This course will begin with a brief overview of the financial techniques used by lawyers, investment bankers, and corporations to evaluate proposed acquisitions of capital assets. We will then consider the possible motivations for such acquisitions. No math is involved and no economics beyond the introductory college level course. The remainder of the course is a consideration of the legal (but non-tax) issues concerning corporate acquisition transactions in both friendly and hostile settings. Some of the doctrinal issues under state corporate law such as the equivalency problem (de facto mergers) and sale of control by a controlling shareholder will be familiar from the Business Entities course. Our consideration of those issues here will be more intense and better informed than in the basic course. Finally, we will examine the federal regulations governing tender offers and proxy contests. Throughout the course a recurrent emphasis is on the lawyer as planner and counselor rather than the lawyer as adversarial advocate.

Prerequisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300). Restriction: Students may not receive credit for both Mergers and Acquisitions: Law and Lawyering (BUSN-307) and Mergers and Acquisitions (BUSN-305). Title Change: former title was Corporate Acquisitions. 

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MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS (BUSN-305) 3 credits
This course covers mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures. A primary course objective is for each student to gain a well-rounded understanding of the legal framework and rules governing these transactions. Our focus, however, is broader. Throughout, we will examine the role that mergers and acquisitions play in the contemporary corporate world and the broader world. We will consider the use of these devices as a strategic tool to provide growth, enhance competitive position, transform a company or industry, and create shareholder value. We will also consider the impact of these transactions on constituencies other than shareholders, and on society in general. At the end of the course, each student should have not only a mastery of the legal rules governing mergers and acquisitions, but also an enhanced understanding of the nature of the modern corporation.

Prerequisites: Business Entities (BUSN-300) or The Modern Corporation (BUSN-150). Restriction: Students may not receive credit for both Mergers and Acquisitions: Law and Lawyering (BUSN-307) and Mergers and Acquisitions (BUSN-305).

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MILITARY LAW (GOVT-325) 2 credits
Sixty years before the birth of Christ, Cicero famously remarked "inter armaenim silent leges," translated to "in a time of war the law falls silent..." In the recent case of Hamdan v Rumsfeld the U.S. Supreme Court rejected this ancient principle, recognizing instead that when military operations begin, law and justice are never silenced. This course will explore (and test) the current relationship between core principles of military justice and the enduring values of a democratic society. We will also explore the unique relationship between military law, Conventions, and various treaties. We will explore the interface between military law and the emerging body of international human rights law, and consider pragmatic challenges governing the use of force. We will examine military laws in other countries, and attempt to answer many difficult questions, including, "Should there even be a separate body of military law in the United States?"

No prerequisites.

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MODERATE MEANS PRACTICUM (LPRC-425) 3 credits
Students in this course will learn and apply interviewing, issue spotting, focused legal writing, and practice management skills while working with individuals seeking assistance with family law, consumer, or housing matters. The Moderate Means Program is a partnership between the three Washington law schools and the Washington State Bar Association to help serve the large group of individuals who are financially ineligible for government-funded free legal services but unable to afford to pay market rates for legal assistance. The first seven weeks of the Practicum will be devoted to training in substantive law, practical skills, legal ethics, and program procedural matters. In the second half of the semester, students will interview clients and prepare materials for referrals to attorneys available to take on the actual representation. Eight hours of office-hours a week will be required.

This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE MEDIATION PRACTICUM (PROP-410) 3 credits
The Mortgage Foreclosure Mediation Practicum will focus on pre-foreclosure mediation and home mortgage modifications and includes a 10-hour/week on-site internship at the Northwest Justice Project's Foreclosure Prevention Unit. Class sessions are front loaded and designed to familiarize you with Washington's foreclosure processes and laws involving pre-foreclosure mediation requirements under the Foreclosure Fairness Act, as well as the various federal programs established to assist homeowners seeking to prevent foreclosure. In this course, you will gain intimate understanding of net present value calculations used to assess the value of modifications and other state and federal laws and regulations as they regard mortgage lending. Around the second or third week of the semester, you will commence the practical portion of the class where you will work with an experienced attorney on-site at the Northwest Justice Project on representing homeowners in pre-foreclosure mediation. Students must have sufficient time in their schedule during normal business hours to accommodate the 10-hour commitment. During the internship portion of the class, you will engage in factual investigation, interviewing, counseling, and negotiation on behalf of distressed homeowners, and with lenders and beneficiaries. You will also be responsible for engaging in one community outreach event during the course of the semester.

NOTE:

  1. Your work will involve subsidized travel (via public transportation) to Seattle or possibly the Tacoma area, depending on your attorney-supervisor placement. 
  2. This class does NOT count towards externship or clinical hours.

Pre or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (PROF-200)
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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MUNICIPAL LAW (GOVT-305) 2 credits
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the law of municipal corporations (cities, counties, special purpose districts) from the perspective of the corporation counsel, such as the city, district, or prosecuting attorney. Particular emphasis will be placed on the powers, authorities, and immunities of the municipal corporation or political subdivision, the legislative body, and various municipal officers. The course will also examine municipal functions and the provision of services such as zoning and development permit processing, public works contracting, code enforcement, licensing, public utility franchising, taxing, police and fire protection. Students should expect to develop an understanding of the interplay between municipal services and applicable laws, such as competitive bidding, open public meetings acts (sunshine laws), appearance of fairness, public disclosure acts, initiative and referendum, growth management, and the public duty doctrine. There will be special emphasis on the role of the corporation counsel in public meetings and hearings before the legislative body, planning commissions, hearing examiners, and other administrative bodies.

No prerequisites.

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NATIONAL SECURITY LAW (GOVT-500) 1 credit

This course will examine the legal framework for the most important and controversial national security issues of our day, using the President's call for a military strike against the government of Syria and other late-breaking events as teaching points. Readings and class discussion will cover post-9/11 national security statutes, doctrine, strategies and policies; Homeland Security Presidential Directives; judicial proceedings under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act; and Supreme Court decisions on the division of authority between the President and Congress and between the federal and state governments. The course will also explore the rule of law in national security cyber defense and cyber exploitation activities.

No prerequisites.

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NATURAL RESOURCES LAW (ENVL-365) 3 credits
This course covers selected topics in natural resources law and policy. Topics will include, among others, management of protected public lands (national parks, forests, and refuges), wildlife and biodiversity, and marine resources. Students will examine common law and constitutional underpinnings of natural resource law, several major federal natural resources statutes, and controversial questions concerning the scope of endangered species protection, the intersection of science and law, and conflicts between public and private interests in land and resource management. There are no prerequisites for the course.

No prerequisites.

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NEGOTIATION (ALDR-505) 1 credit
This course examines the skills, constraints, and dynamics of the negotiation process. A theoretical framework for understanding negotiation practice in a variety of commercial contexts will be developed through readings, as well as highly interactive exercises and role-plays. The course addresses fundamental skills such as systematic preparation, management of the negotiation process, and identification of optimal agreements. Ethical constraints of negotiation also are considered. Course content is drawn from the fields of law, psychology, business, and communication. This course does NOT fulfill the professional skills requirement.

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NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, TRUST LAW, AND PHILANTHROPY (ESTA-320) 3 credits
This course surveys the organizational, operational, fiduciary, constitutional, wealth management, philanthropic, and other policy considerations that affect the nonprofit sector and its impact on society. This course will be of particular relevance to those students who wish to represent nonprofit entities or their donors, students who may work for or interact with the various governmental agencies that regulate nonprofit organizations and activities, and those students who wish to become involved in nonprofit and charitable endeavors as directors, trustees, or volunteers. After a brief introduction of select trust law topics relating to wealth management the course will focus upon the role and operation of nonprofit organizations and philanthropy in society.

Grades in this seminar course will be based primarily upon a research paper on a topic of relevance to the course, as selected by the student and approved (with much flexibility) by the professor. Sample topics might include (but are not limited to): a historical and policy-based examination of the nonprofit sector and philanthropic motivations; the formation, operation, and dissolution of nonprofit entities; corporate governance of nonprofit entities, including issues of compensation, liability, and fiduciary responsibility; the interaction of trust law and corporate standards of fiduciary responsibility; donor-charity dealings in crafting, managing, and modifying long-term charitable gifts; the enforcement of donor restrictions and the fiduciary obligations of nonprofit management; and current trends affecting the nonprofit sector.

Recommended but not required: Business Entities (BUSN-300) and Trusts and Estates (ESTA-300).

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NOT FOR PROFIT ORGANIZATION CLINIC (TAXL-400) 2 credits
Students in this Clinic will have the opportunity to put their interest in and knowledge of business and tax law into practice. Working in teams of two, students will work with individuals and community groups interested in creating a non-profit organization. Students will counsel their clients on the most appropriate entity for their purposes and prepare and file the documents necessary to create the organization, such as articles of incorporation, bylaws and state and federal tax documents. Students will also advise their clients about the various state laws and regulations with which the clients will need to comply. Students will receive the additional knowledge and skills necessary to do this legal representation in a classroom component. Beginning the third week of the semester, students must also maintain office hours in the Clinic offices twice a week for two hours each session. Office hours will be established based on the schedules of each student team. 

Prerequisite: Individual Income Taxation (TAXL-300). Pre or co-requisite: Taxation of Charitable Organizations (TAXL-325); or Nonprofit Organizations, Trust Law, and Philanthropy (ESTA-320); or a two-part, four-hour workshop (will be offered for enrolled students early in the semester). Restriction: Must meet conflicts of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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OCCUPATION, LAW AND POLITICS (JURS-327) 2 credits
Occupation has been defined as "effective control of a power (be it one or more states or an international organization, such as the United Nations) over a territory to which that power has no sovereign title, without the violation of the sovereign territory." This course will explore the legal, political, and moral underpinnings and consequences of occupation. We have witnessed a marked increase in military and other occupation: Iraq and Afghanistan by the U.S., and the West Bank and Gaza by Israel, for instance. The course will examine how international law defines and regulates occupation. What is occupation? On what grounds does modern jurisprudence authorize and constrain occupation? What is the difference between a legal occupation and an illegal occupation? How does occupation, regulated by and through law, differ from colonialism? Readings will focus on several case studies to explore the legal, political and moral implications of occupation, including Puerto Rico, South Africa, Palestine, and Iraq.

No prerequisites.

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ONLINE ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH (LRES-360) 2 credits
Online Advanced Legal Research is an online version of Advanced Legal Research (Legal Research Methods). Building on the research fundamentals acquired in Legal Writing I, this course will enhance the student's research skills through instruction on resource selection, research strategies and search techniques. Emphasis will be placed on gaining familiarity and competence with the materials most commonly used by attorneys in day to day practice. We will work with print sources, on-line databases, and free sources of law on the Internet. Cost-effective and efficient research will be stressed.
Because this course is offered completely online with no regularly scheduled class meeting times, students taking this course must be comfortable learning and using new technology platforms. It is recommended, but not required, that students be able to access a physical law library to use certain print materials. Students should expect to spend an average 6 to 10 hours per week working on the course. In addition to readings, students must turn in research assignments each week. During weeks 4 and 8 (of the 8 week course), students will work on exams. These are sets of complex research questions requiring students to conduct research and demonstrate mastery of the skills taught in the previous weeks. While not a prerequisite, it is suggested that this class be taken after completion of Legal Writing II.

Restrictions: Course must be taken pass/fail. Students may not receive credit for more than one of the following courses: Advanced Electronic Legal Research (LRES-350); Advanced Legal Research (LRES-300); and Online Advanced Legal Research (LRES-360). Recommended but not required: Legal Writing II (WRIT-200).

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PATENT LAW (INTP-305) 4 credits
This is an introductory course in patent law. It is designed to provide would-be patent lawyers and non-patent lawyers alike with an understanding of the fundamentals of the United States patent law and the work of the United States Patent Office. Topics will include patentable subject matter, the requirements for patentability (utility, novelty, nonobviousness, and enablement), conduct requirements in the U.S. Patent Office, reissue and reexamination of patents in the Patent Office, patent infringement analyses, and remedies for patent infringement, patent licensing and misuse considerations. The cases and materials have been selected so as to focus, where possible, on technologically simple inventions. No technical background is necessary.

No prerequisites. Title Change: former title was Patent and Trade Secret Law.

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PATENT LITIGATION LAB (INTP-306) 1 credit
This course will examine the typical events in the life of a patent infringement lawsuit from the initial awareness of an infringing product through trial. Students will learn how to analyze patents and patent prosecution histories to evaluate whether a product infringes a patent. They will learn how to prepare or will draft for themselves a cease and desist letter, noninfringement or invalidity opinion letter, complaints, answers, motions to transfer, protective orders, motions for preliminary injunctions, expert reports for technical, legal, and damages experts, and jury instructions. The course will also discuss trial exhibits and witnesses in a patent infringement trial.

Recommended but not required: Patent Law (INTP-305). Restriction: This course must be taken pass/fail.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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PATENT PROSECUTION LAB (INTP-308) 1 credit
In this course, students will examine the events commonly associated in preparing and prosecuting a patent application. During the course, students will conduct a patentability search, prepare a patentability opinion letter, and draft a patent application. They will also analyze and prepare responses to patent office actions rejecting the application. Students will either learn how to prepare or will draft for themselves additional documents that are typically encountered in a patent application process, such as declarations, assignments, information disclosure statements, preliminary amendments, and terminal disclaimers.

Recommended but not required: Patent Law (INTP-305). Restriction: This course must be taken pass/fail.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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PAYMENT LAW (COMM-300) 2 credits
This course analyzes the vehicles, other than money, that people use to evidence or pay for obligations. Considered are traditional vehicles such as promissory notes, drafts, and checks and more recent devices such as credit cards, debit cards, and "wholesale" wire transfers. With respect to the more traditional devices, the course treats issues such as the requirements of negotiability for a note or draft, the requirements to become and the rights of a holder in due course, and the obligations of parties to negotiable instruments. Also analyzed is the check collection process, the relationships of customers to their banks, and the allocation of responsibilities for forgeries, forged indorsements, and alterations.
The portion of the course pertaining to more recent payment devices considers the responsibility of credit card and debit card holders for unauthorized transactions, the card holders' rights to assert defenses against issuers that the holders might have against the persons to whom payment was directed, and the law's treatment of billing and related errors. In addition, this part of the course deals with the issues that arise in the use of wholesale wire transfers, those transfers ordinarily in excess of $1 million that are used in large commercial transactions. Discussed are the mechanics of wholesale wire transfers, the responsibilities of originating, intermediary, and beneficiary banks, and the consequences of taking a wire transfer in payment of the underlying obligations. Also analyzed are mistakes in transmissions and mistaken or fraudulent wire orders.

Most of the above topics are analyzed under and governed by the Uniform Commercial Code. Also considered, however, are federal statutes and regulations such as Regulation J, governing the check collection process through the Federal Reserve System, Regulation CC, governing the time within which checks must be paid or returned, and the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, which pertains to consumer electronic funds transfers.

The course is very important for students contemplating a practice in commercial law and important for those considering a general or business practice. In the former, a practitioner is likely to evaluate and draft commercial instruments and deal with advising on the transfers of substantial sums of money. In the latter, an attorney may encounter check collection and forgery problems as well as some problems involving electronic funds transfers. Issues from the course are frequently tested on state bar examinations, making the course significant for all students since many students consider the arcane issues in the course difficult to master on their own.

No prerequisites.

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PENSIONS AND EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (3 credits) TAXL-320
This course covers the rules for the formation, maintenance, funding and tax treatment of plans providing retirement benefits (including qualified pension and nonqualified deferred compensation plans), and of "welfare benefit plans" providing current employee benefits, including health and cafeteria plans. We will consider both qualification requirements and fiduciary duties. Our primary focus will be on the tax and labor titles of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA).

Prerequisite: Individual Income Tax (TAXL-300).

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PLEA AND SENTENCING (CRIM-318) 2 credits
This course will examine the plea and sentencing process.

Any understanding of how the American criminal justice system actually works must begin with the fact that about 90% of all cases across the country are resolved by the defendant pleading guilty. The plea bargaining process that leads to those guilty pleas is under more scrutiny than ever given recent United State Supreme Court decisions. The roles of the prosecuting attorney and of the defense counsel will be discussed in this context.

In the late 20th century, American sentencing policy was characterized by a shift toward determinate sentencing and mandatory minimum penalties. In recent years, concerns about racial disparity and over-incarceration have led to a re-examination of - and some moves away from - these policies. Currently, many jurisdictions are also experimenting with treatment courts designed to address the special challenges posed by defendants with chemical dependency and other features of mental illness. We will look at how these collaborative courts are transforming a system designed on an adversarial model.

No prerequisites.

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POLICE, LAW AND THE COMMUNITY (CRIM-370) 2 credits
Policing has undergone fundamental change over the last half century. This has led to a rethinking of the relationship between the police and the citizenry. Yet, police remain the first line of defense to crime and gatekeepers to the criminal justice system. This seminar course will explore the legal and policy frameworks for the exercise of police authority in America (with emphasis on Washington State). The underlying tension between the parameters of liberty and order in our society will be critically reviewed through an analysis of the legislation and case law that regulate police conduct. Additionally, legal scholarship and social science research will be utilized where appropriate.

Issues relating to the limits of arrest and search and seizure law, police discipline and accountability, claims and lawsuits alleging misconduct, use of force, and drug law enforcement will be addressed. An historical review which analyzes the development of the role of police (local, state, and federal) will be provided.

Guest lecturers will include a wide range of prosecutors, public defenders, civil law attorneys, judges, and police officials. Through case studies and hypotheticals, the class will critically review the impact of police work in a democratic society on the communities they serve. Students will be expected to participate in class discussion and complete a research paper.

Prerequisite: Criminal Procedure Investigative (CRIM-305).

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POVERTY LAW (POVL-300) 3 credits
This course aims to create a critical dialogue about the role of law in structuring wealth inequality and remedying such inequality. The interdisciplinary course materials that we will be using throughout the semester have been selected to help students engage in critical analysis about the roles of capitalism, white supremacy, patriarchy, and ableism in structuring law, as well as law's role in structuring those systemic conditions. The course will explore:
• specific questions and histories concerning public benefits, disaster relief, housing, imprisonment, immigration, and other legal issues facing low-income populations;
• how societal, governmental, and justice system responses to inequality have resulted in the "silo-ing" of both problems as well as responses to them, resulting in "blindness" to intersecting forms of bias and oppression that compounds unfairness and suffering;
• how we might conceptualize different ways the law and justice system can ally itself with community-based social movements and governance frameworks aimed at redistributing wealth and life chances instead of perpetuating the unfairness and oppressive conditions perpetuated by the status quo.

No prerequisites.

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PREDATORY LENDING CLINIC (ADVC-410) 3 credits
The Predatory Lending Clinic will focus on consumer protection and mortgage foreclosures. Students will represent clients in predatory lending matters relating to home mortgages, mortgage modifications, and unfair practices related to mortgage modification and debt relief. Students will have the chance to engage factual investigation, counseling, negotiation, and mediation. Students will also engage in community projects, educating laypersons on topics related to debt collection, and mortgage lending laws and regulations. If you enroll, you must attend the classroom component (which will be 75 minutes twice per week) and maintain office hours in the Law Clinic.

Pre or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (PROF-200). Restrictions: must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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PRODUCTS LIABILITY (TORT-300) 3 credits
Products liability law combines the two great common subjects: tort, with its focus on personal injury and vulnerability, and contract, with its basic assumptions about marketplace bargaining and risk allocation. Product liability law has blossomed in only three decades, making it a rich and provocative source for exploring competing legal institutions, law and politics, and law and culture. This course analyzes consumer remedies and theories of recovery in the products area, focusing on the legal effects of buying and using, as well as producing, advertising, and selling consumer products. With its emphasis on problems and on practice concerns, this course is ideal for those who contemplate a civil litigation practice.

No prerequisites.

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PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY (PROF-200) 3 credits
Legal ethics, including lawyer-client relations, lawyer-public relations, and lawyer's responsibility to the legal profession and the courts. Detailed coverage of the ABA Code of Professional Responsibility, cases and materials on professional responsibility, and important Washington law.

No prerequisites.
This is a required course.
This is a bar tested course.

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PUBLIC BENEFITS LAW (POVL-310) 3 credits
This course surveys the major state and federal public benefit programs for including cash, medical, and food assistance for low-income persons. The primary focus is on needs-based programs including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, General Assistance, Food Stamps, Medicaid, and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). The course will also cover insurance-based programs that low-income persons rely upon including Social Security and Unemployment Insurance. The course will emphasize the basic parameter of the major programs as well as new developments and emerging proposals for reform.

No prerequisites.

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PUBLIC HEALTH LAW (HLTH-375) 2 credits
Public Health Law will be a review of the legal and public policy issues that arise in dealing with contagious diseases, environmental dangers, and high-risk behavior.

Prerequisites: Constitutional Law (CNLW-200). Recommended but not required: Health Law I (HLTH-305).

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PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW (INTL-300) 3 credits
This course provides a basic introduction to the concepts, institutions, and procedures of international law, and the relationship between international law and domestic legal systems. We will explore how international law is formed, how it is interpreted, and how it is enforced. The course will draw on contemporary international disputes in the areas of human rights, criminal law, refugee and immigration law, the domestic regulation of the foreign affairs power of the US government, and the regulation of armed conflict to illustrate the reach and influence of international and national legal systems. Students who received credit for the International Law 1L elective are not eligible to enroll in this course.

No prerequisites.

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PUBLIC LEGAL DECISIONS (PROF-360) 2 credits
This seminar will use a case-study method to analyze several controversial decisions by public figure lawyers (e.g., the decision to not seek the death penalty in the Green River Killer case). Analysis of caselaw, statutory provisions, and pertinent ethical rules will be supplemented by meetings with lawyer-leaders involved in the decisions. Some meetings may take place outside of scheduled class times and at locations other than the Law School in order to maximize student contact with the leaders. Students will be expected to participate in seminar discussions and in meetings with guests exploring the controversial decisions which are the subject of the case studies. Each seminar student will prepare a research paper examining a student-identified controversial public legal decision in the United States or around the world.

No prerequisites.

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QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR LAWYERS (JURS-322) 3 credits
This course will introduce students to common methods of statistical analysis encountered in a legal context. The goal is not to produce "lawyer-statisticians," but to develop in students an understanding of the processes, assumptions, and limitations of quantitative methods. Topics include basic research methodology, the logic of statistical inference, establishing causality, forecasting, and prediction. This course assumes students have only a basic background in mathematics.

No prerequisites.

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Student studying in the Law Library