The Order of Barristers

Seattle University’s Moot Court Board seeks your application for The Order of Barristers. The Order of Barristers is a national honorary organization whose purpose is the encouragement of oral advocacy and brief writing skills through effective law school oral advocacy programs. The Order seeks to improve these programs through interscholastic sharing of ideas, information, and resources. The Order also provides national recognition for individuals who have excelled in advocacy and service at their respective schools. Moot Court Board spearheads the nomination process for Seattle University School of Law by identifying and nominating a certain number of students for admission into the national Order of Barristers.

To be eligible for nomination, you must be graduating in May 2014. Nomination selection is based upon points earned for activities including Moot Court Board membership, Dispute Resolution Board membership, participating as a bailiff, participating as a witness, competing in in-house, regional, and national competitions, and completing certain law school courses.

The top point earners are nominated by the Moot Court Board to the National Order of Barristers and invited to the Moot Court Board’s Annual Banquet in April of 2014.

Applications will be available beginning in the early March of 2014, and will be due in late March of 2014. In February, you may obtain an electronic copy of the application by joining the "Moot Court Sign-Up Page" on TWEN and downloading the application listed under the “Order of the Barristers” subsection.

If you have any questions, please see the FAQ below or contact the Moot Court Board Executive Secretary.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Order of Barristers only for students who have won Moot Court and/or Dispute Resolution competitions?

No - Participation (either as a competitor, bailiff, witness) in these competitions will earn points. It doesn’t matter if you won. Students can also earn points for membership on either the Moot Court Board or Dispute Resolution Board and for taking certain advocacy classes (see the application for a non-inclusive list)

Can I get points for other advocacy classes not listed?

Possibly. The list is a non-inclusive list. On your application, list other classes you have taken that you believe would qualify. The scoring committee will look at the course description to see if it meets the advocacy criteria.

Can I get points for my Evidence class?

No. You cannot get points for required classes. Evidence is a required course for all students (like Con Law and Legal Writing I & II).

Can I get points for an externship, Inns of Court, or a job I had while in law school?

No.

Can I submit my application by e-mail?

No - All applications must be submitted in hard copy - signed by the applicant. Applications must be placed in the Moot Court lockbox, which is outside the Moot Court office.

Does my application have to be typed?

No - All it has to be is legible. Handwritten application forms are acceptable. The application is only used by the scoring committee to tally points. The application form is not submitted with the nominations – only the list of names.

Should I submit my resume or a cover letter with my application?

No - Only the application will be considered.

What if I am participating in a competition after the deadline?

You may list the competition and the Administrators will consider it. However, typically, you cannot receive points for participation that hasn’t occurred by the application deadline because all participation must be verified. We cannot verify participation that has not yet occurred.

What if I don’t remember the exact date of a competition I participated in?

Provide as much information about the competition as you can. You may also check the "last modified" dates on any notes or computer documents you prepared in association with a particular competition to help refresh your memory. Consult old calendars or datebooks.

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