Revolution Now

A film series presented by the Adolf A. Berle, Jr. Center on Corporations, Law and Society

There will be an informal discussion after each showing. We encourage you to join the conversation. A brief handout "3 Things to Consider" will be provided as the stepping off point.

All films are in Wyckoff Auditorium, Bannan Hall, Room 200.

Admission is always free

September 2010


Disturbing the Universe film posterWilliam Kunstler: Disturbing the Universe

September 29, 2010

2 screenings: Noon - 2 p.m. & 5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

"Shatteringly good" - The San Francisco Chronicle

"A wonderful, inspiring film" - Howard Zinn

"The most hated and the most loved lawyer in America" - NY Times

In William Kunstler: Disturbing the Universe filmmakers Emily Kunstler and Sarah Kunstler explore the life of their father, the late radical civil rights lawyer. In the 1960s and 70s, Kunstler fought for civil rights with Martin Luther King Jr. and represented the famed "Chicago 8" activists who protested the Vietnam War. When the inmates took over Attica prison, or when the American Indian Movement stood up to the federal government at Wounded Knee, they asked Kunstler to be their lawyer.
To his daughters, it seemed that he was at the center of everything important that had ever happened. But when they were growing up, Kunstler represented some of the most reviled members of society, including rapists and assassins. This powerful film not only recounts the historic causes that Kunstler fought for; it also reveals a man that even his own daughters did not always understand, a man who risked public outrage and the safety of his family so that justice could serve all.

October 2010


The Most Dangerous Man in America film posterThe Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers

October 13, 2010

2 screenings: Noon - 2 p.m. & 5 - 7 p.m.

 

Trailer and Additional Information

"A Must-See! Crams a wealth of material into 90 minutes without losing clarity or momentum. Focuses on (Ellsberg's) moral turnaround, which directly impacted history. A unique fusion of personal and social drama." - Ronnie Scheib, Variety


"The filmmakers do an astounding job... earnest, smart documentary... "The Most Dangerous Man" offers a brisk and eye-opening approach to recent history." - Chris Barsanti, Hollywood Reporter

In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg, a leading Vietnam War strategist, concludes that America's role in the war is based on decades of lies. He leaks 7,000 pages of top-secret documents to The New York Times, a daring act of conscience that leads directly to Watergate, President Nixon's resignation and the end of the Vietnam War. Ellsberg and a who's-who of Vietnam-era movers and shakers give a riveting account of those world-changing event .


The Fight in the Fields film posterThe Fight in the Fields: Cesar Chavez and the Farmworkers' Struggle

October 27, 2010

2 screenings: Noon - 2 p.m. & 5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

"Compelling...an intimate portrait of one man whose quiet charisma and understanding of power made a huge difference."- Los Angeles Times
"This vivid two-hour tribute to the life and work of Cesar Chavez is told in the context of the hard lives of the migrant farm workers whose cause he forced upon the nation's conscience."- NY Times

More than two years in the making, The Fight in the Fields: Cesar Chavez and the Farmworkers' Struggle is the first film to cover the full arc of Cesar Chávez' life.
Using archival footage, newsreel, and present-day interviews with Ethel Kennedy, former California Governor Jerry Brown, Dolores Huerta, and Chávez' brother, sister, son and daughter, among others, the documentary traces the remarkable contributions of Chávez and others involved in this epic struggle.

November 2010


Soundtrack for a Revolution film posterSoundtrack for a Revolution

November 17, 2010

2 screenings: Noon - 2 p.m. & 5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

"Movements need anthems, and the fight for civil rights in the '50s and '60s had some amazing ones: "We Shall Overcome," "Eyes on the Prize," "Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around." These songs gave everyday men and women the power to stand up and the fortitude to not stand down. You can credit Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman's documentary for reminding us about just what these freedom fighters had to endure: public humiliations, police brutality and constant threats of physical violence. Even if you've seen this footage of the sit-ins at Southern diners, the Selma-to-Montgomery marches and Martin Luther King Jr.'s funeral before, you can't help but be moved to your core. For anyone who is either ignorant of or has simply forgotten the extent to which broken bones and unbowed heads paved the way for the Obama Age, it's a much-needed history lesson." - David Fear Time Out New York

January 2011

Eyes on the Prize, the landmark documentary on the Civil Rights Movement that first aired 20 years ago, returns.

The lauded six-part series captures the birth of the movement from Emmett Till's murder in 1955 and focuses on key moments in the movement, including the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I have a dream" speech capping the 1963 March on Washington, the Freedom March in Alabama, the rise of the Black Panthers, desegregation and Jesse Jackson's Operation PUSH.


Mamie TillEyes on the Prize: The Civil Rights Movement | Awakenings (1954 - 1956)

January 12, 2010

Noon - 2 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information


Rosa ParksEyes on the Prize: The Civil Rights Movement | Fighting Back (1957-1962)

January 12, 2010

5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information


Martin Luther King, Jr.Eyes on the Prize: The Civil Rights Movement | Ain't Scared of Your Jails (1960-1961)

January 19, 2010

Noon - 2 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information


Elizabeth Ann EckfordEyes on the Prize: The Civil Rights Movement | No Easy Walk (1961-1963)

January 19, 2010

5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information


James ChaneyEyes on the Prize: The Civil Rights Movement | Mississippi: Is This America? (1962 -1964)

January 26, 2010

Noon - 2 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information


Marchers, Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965Eyes on the Prize: The Civil Rights Movement | Bridge to Freedom (1965)

January 26, 2010

5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

February 2011


Scottsboro: An American Tragedy film posterScottsboro: An American Tragedy

February 9, 2010

2 screenings: Noon - 2 p.m. & 5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

In March 1931, a freight train crowded with homeless and jobless hoboes left Chattanooga, Tennessee, bound for points west. A short time after it crossed into Alabama, a fight erupted between two groups of hoboes-one black and one white. The train was stopped by an armed posse in the tiny town of Paint Rock, Alabama. Before anyone knew what had happened, two white women stepped from the shadows of a boxcar to make a shocking accusation: they had been raped by nine black teenagers aboard the train.
So began one of the most significant legal fights of the twentieth century. Before it was over, the Scottsboro affair-so-named for the little Alabama town where the nine were put on trial for their lives-would divide Americans along racial, political, and geographic lines. It would draw North and South into their sharpest conflict since the Civil War, yield two momentous Supreme Court decisions, and give birth to the Civil Rights Movement.

March 2011


Brother Outsider film posterBrother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin

March 9, 2011

Noon - 2 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

A master strategist and tireless activist, Bayard Rustin is best remembered as the organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, one of the largest nonviolent protests ever held in the United States. He brought Gandhi's protest techniques to the American civil rights movement, and helped mold Martin Luther King, Jr. into an international symbol of peace and nonviolence.
Despite these achievements, Rustin was silenced, threatened, arrested, beaten, imprisoned and fired from important leadership positions, largely because he was an openly gay man in a fiercely homophobic era. Five years in the making and the winner of numerous awards, BROTHER OUTSIDER presents a feature-length documentary portrait, focusing on Rustin's activism for peace, racial equality, economic justice and human rights.

Awards

2004 GLAAD MEDIA AWARD for Outstanding Documentary

SILVER HUGO AWARD,
Chicago International Television Competition, 2004

JURY AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY,
2004 Icelandic Gay & Lesbian Film Festival

Nominated for 2004 NAACP Image Award for Best Nonfiction Programming

First Prize, Documentary Competition
2003 Rhode Island International Film Festival

Winner
2004 American Library Association Notable Videos for Adults Award

Winner
2003 CINE Golden Eagle

Winner, Best Documentary Feature Award,
2003 Cinequest San Jose Film Festival

Winner, Best Documentary Award,
2003 Turin International Gay and Lesbian Film Festival

Jury Award for Best Documentary,
2003 Chicago Lesbian and Gay Film Festival

Jury Award
2003 Athens International Film and Video Festival

Audience Award
2003 Pittsburgh International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival

Audience Award
2003 Indianapolis LGBT Film Festival

Audience Award for Best Feature-Length Film,
2003 New York Lesbian and Gay Film Festival

Audience Award for Best Documentary,
2003 San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival

Audience Award for Best Documentary
2003 Outfest/Los Angeles Lesbian and Gay Film Festival

Audience Award for Best Documentary,
2003 Philadelphia Lesbian and Gay Film Festival

Official Selection
2003 Sundance Film Festival

Official Selection
2003 Amnesty International Human Rights Film Festival

Official Selection
2003 National Black Arts Festival

Nominated for 2003 International Documentary Association/ABCNEWS VideoSource Award "for the best use of news footage as an integral component in a documentary."

Nominated for 2003 International Documentary Association PARE LORENTZ AWARD for the film that "best reflects the social activism, democratic principles and creative lyrical vision of the films of Pare Lorentz, American pioneer of documentary filmmaking"


Screaming Queens film posterScreaming Queens: The Riot at Compton's Cafeteria

March 9, 2011

5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

Three years before the famous rioting at New York's Stonewall Inn, there was a riot in San Francisco at Gene Compton's Cafeteria. On a hot Summer's night in 1966, in the city's Tenderloin district, a group of transgender women and gay street-hustlers fought back for the first time in history against everyday police harassment. This act of resistance was a dramatic turning point for the transgender community, and the beginning of a new human rights struggle that continues to this very day.


Before Stonewall film posterBefore Stonewall

March 23, 2011

Noon - 2 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

"Funny, sad, courageous and touching" - The Seattle Times

"Entertaining and enlightening" - Los Angeles Times

"Required Viewing" - The Apollo Guide

In 1969, the patrons of the Stonewall Inn in New York's Greenwich Village decided to fight back, transforming a routine police raid into three nights of rioting which marked the beginning of the Gay Liberation movement. Before Stonewall examines the historical background to this sudden burst of political energy - from the social experimentation of the Roaring Twenties, to the discovery of the true size of this hidden society during World War II, to the scape-goating of homosexuals during the McCarthy era, to the development of the early homophile rights movement - providing an informative and engaging portrait of the history of homosexual experience in America.

What started tumbling out of the closets at the time of Stonewall has profoundly altered the way we all live." - The Nation


After Stonewall film posterAfter Stonewall

March 23, 2011

5 - 7 p.m.

Trailer and Additional Information

From the emergence of the 70's Gay Liberation Movement and Womyn's music festivals to the onslaught of AIDS, the vibrant Gay Games movement and Ellen DeGeneres' highly publicized coming out performance, AFTER STONEWALL presents a story as compelling, rewarding and provocative as the individual lesbians and gays who defined the era.

April 2011


Fire in the Heartland film posterFire in the Heartland

April 6, 2011

2 screenings: Noon - 2 p.m. & 5 - 7 p.m.

Meet the Filmmakers: check back for details

Trailer and Additional Information

"Fire in the Heartland is at times so chilling it raises goose bumps" - Cleveland Plain Dealer

Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th, and Student Protest in America is a documentary film about a generation of young people, who stood up to speak their minds against social injustice in someof our nation's most turbulent and transformative years, the 1960s through the 1970s. On May 4th,1970, thirteen of these young Americans were shot down by the National Guard in an act of violenceagainst unarmed students that has never been fully explained. Four, Jeffery Miller, Sandy Scheuer, BillShroeder and Allison Krause, were killed. Immediately afterward the largest student strikes andstudent protests in history swept across 3,000 campuses nationwide, punctuated ten days later by theshooting of African American students at Jackson State University. There, James Earl Green andPhillip Lafayette Gibbs were killed.This student protest in America did not arise from nowhere. At the same time that authorities fromLyndon Johnson and Hubert Humphrey to Richard Nixon and Governor Rhodes acted as if theprotesters were wrong, they were not, and by May 4 1970, the majority of the American people agreedwith the views of the students. They represented an active critical voice that questioned the terrible andcontinuing violence against African Americans and the white students who rose to support them, andthe perpetration of a war that killed millions of Vietnamese people and more than 50,000 Americanswhile the news of the war brought back to students--potential draftees and friends and relatives of thedead and wounded Vietnam veterans--stories of epic corruption.The story is a personal story for those who tell it and for every viewer who lived through these times,but also for their sons and daughters, and for all Americans. This is not just the story of a violentturning point, because these young people were not the supporters of violence. It is most of all about ahoped for new day for a generation and the music, art, literature, and politics that accompanied it. Thispersonal story is told by over 20 voices of those people at Kent who lived through the movement. Itbegan in alliance with the civil rights struggles, with silent vigils and education efforts, it grew intomassive demonstrations, sit-ins, strikes, and activist protests, and this movement went on after thetragic events of May 4. The voices include men and women, activists, musicians, attorneys, teachers,historians, journalists, photographers, veterans, musicians, poets and artists. This is their story and astory of all times when human beings are faced with injustice and are asked to choose-to stand by orto stand up, to stay silent or to raise a voice, to stay safe or to put themselves at risk, sometimes at verygreat risk. This is a story that resonates as much today as it did in the 1960s and 1970s.Fire in the Heartland: Kent State, May 4th, and Student Protest in America tells you about more thanthe shocking events of May 4, 1970. Forget what you think you know, and discover the larger truth of a generation.

"We were young, we were foolish, we were arrogant, but we were right."

Daniel Ellsberg
The Most Dangerous Man in America:
Daniel Ellsberg and The Pentagon Papers