Past Events

2010 SU Law Critical Race Summer Film Series

July 15 and August 10, from 3PM - 4:30PM at the Law School Annex, Room 142.  Refreshments will be provided. 

The films aim to inspire reflections and discussions on the intersectionalities of race, gender, nationality, class, sexuality, and the law. These screenings are only open to the faculty, staff, and students at the law school.

2010 SU Law Critical Race Summer Film Series

July 15 and August 10, from 3PM - 4:30PM at the Law School Annex, Room 142.  Refreshments will be provided. 

The films aim to inspire reflections and discussions on the intersectionalities of race, gender, nationality, class, sexuality, and the law. These screenings are only open to the faculty, staff, and students at the law school. 

July 15

Act of War: The Overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation:  This documentary provides a provocative look at a historical event of which few are aware. In mid-January, 1893, armed troops from the U.S.S. Boston landed at Honolulu in support of a coup d'etat against the constitutional sovereign of the Hawaiian Kingdom, Queen Lili'uokalani. The event was described by U.S. President Grover Cleveland as "an act of war." Stylized re-enactments, archival photos and film, political cartoons, historic quotes, and presentations by Hawaiian scholars tell Hawaiian history through Hawaiian eyes.  In 1993, the U.S. Congress passed a joint resolution admitting the illegal taking of Hawai'i and formally apologizing to the Hawaiian people.

August 10

The purpose of showing "Papers" is to provide a tool for individuals and organizations nationwide to raise awareness about the lives of undocumented youth and educate audiences about what they can do to help make change on behalf of these extraordinary young people.

Individuals or organizations are encouraged to co-host their own local events. It's an opportunity to use the film to bring people together and provide audience with information after the film about how they can participate in and support work on these issues.

Seattle Unity Forum

Saturday, June 26, 2010

An exploratory forum that brought together communities of color, sustainability, and social justice activists for an open-ended dialogue that brought forward achievable, immediate steps toward greater unity and political clout across what  have too often been divergent constituencies.  One main topic discussed was homelessness and finding housing for the homeless. The event, hosted at the School of Law, was organized by the Center for Global Justice, Access to Justice Institute and Real Change.  Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn was the guest speaker among seven panelists moderated by Tim Harris of Real Change. 

Criminal Queers

May 14, 2010, 7pm.  University of Washington

The screening of Criminal Queers and Q&A with the directors directly follows the Race/Knowledge Projects conference, Life in Marvelous Times.  The conference will take place all day on May 14th with various panels, performances, workshops, etc.  This Center co-sponsored event is free and open to the public.

The Global Politics of Food:  Sustainability and Subordination

May 6-8, 2010 in Mexico City, Mexico

The South-North Exchange on Theory, Culture and Law ("SNX") met for the first time in 2003 to foster and sustain a trans-national, cross-disciplinary and inter-cultural dialogue on current issues in law, theory and culture.  This Exchange consists of two parts:  an annual encounter and, afterward, a scholarly publication based on the live proceedings.  Both the "live" and published versions of the Exchange aim to bring the combined specialties of the participants to bear on a contemporary issue or topic of common interest across the Americas, through a series of interactive plenary sessions spanning two to three days.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Justice, Departamento de Derecho, Universidad Iberoamericana, Latina and Latino Critical Legal Theory, Inc. ("LatCrit"), and the Sturm College of Law, University of Denver. 

Exiled Voices for Justice: 
A Series of Documentary Screenings and Q&A Panel Discussions

Sunday, February 7, 14 and May 2, 2010; 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Pigott Auditorium

Exiled Voices for Justice will begin at Seattle University with a series of screenings of three documentary films about Burma (Burma VJ, Academy Award Nomination for Feature Documentary, 2010), Sudan (God Grew Tired of Us), and Congo (Lumo), and tentatively continue at the University of Washington with a screening of a documentary film about asylee youth from Central America (Which Way Home, Academy Award Nomination for Feature Documentary, 2010).

This film series is co-sponsored by Refugee and Immigrant Children's Program of the Lutheran Community Services Northwest, the Seattle University Academic Salons program and Coalition for Refugees from Burma as well as endorsed by Global Washington and Seeds of Compassion.

Female Faces of War, the Untold Story

April 13, 2010, 4-6p.m.  Seattle University School of Law, Room C5

This film, produced by Moni Law and cosponsored by the Center and Access to Justice Institute, shares the personal truths of the Iraq and Afghanistan war(s) as lived by American and Iraqi women using compelling interviews with female veterans, Iraqi women, and a soldier's mother.  Based on national and internaitonal itnerest to promote peace adn cross cultural understanding, this film has great education importance.  The film has valuable information for comparative law students and especially for students who are interested in women issues, contemporary Muslim legal systems, Islamic law and human rights.

Some women from the film were in attendance.

Intersectionality:  Challenging Theory, Reframing Politics, Transforming Movements

March 13-15, 2010.  UCLA School of Law

Since the publication of Kimberle Crenshaw's formative articles - Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race & Sex (1989), and Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality has traversed more than a dozen academic disciplines and transnational and popular political discourse, generated multiple conferences, monographs, and anthologies, and animated hundreds of articles and essays.  In the twenty years since Crenshaw introduced intersectionality, critiques of identity politics and multiculturalism and, more recently, claims of a "post-racial" era have blossomed.  In 2010, to be revisited are the origins of intersectionality as a theoretical frame and site of legal interventions and consider its still unfolding potential for unmasking subordination and provoking social change.  The Center proudly co-sponsors this event

The War in Afghanistan:  Its Genesis and the Way Out

Monday, February 8, 2010 at 5:00 p.m., 2nd Floor Gallery.  Reception after the presentation.

Kamran Shafi is an influential Pakistani journalist who writes a weekly column in Dawn, the most prestigious English language newspaper of Pakistan.  He hosted a current affairs program on DawnNews-TV (2008-09).  He served as late Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's press secretary (1988-89), and as Minister (Information) at Pakistan's embassy in London (1994-96).   He is a leading advocate of democratic governance and civilian control over all institutions of the state, especially the military and intelligence services.

School of Law Annex