CILP Staff

Erica L. WolfErica L. Wolf

Executive Director

wolfer@seattleu.edu

Erica Wolf is the Executive Director of the Center for Indian Law & Policy, and is responsible for the leadership, management, and day-to-day operations of the Center for the benefit of the School of Law and its students. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at the Ronald A. Peterson Law Clinic, where she teaches a clinical course in Indian Trusts & Estates. Ms. Wolf is a 2005 graduate of Seattle University School of Law and has served as the Center's managing attorney and a supervising attorney of the Indian Estate Planning Project since 2006.

Prior to joining Seattle University School of Law, Ms. Wolf worked in private practice. Her practiced involved litigation, business law, and estate planning. She is a member of the state bars of Washington, California, and Alaska, and is a member of the federal bar in the Western District of Washington.

Guadalupe CeballosGuadalupe Ceballos

Staff Attorney

ceballosl@seattleu.edu

Guadalupe Ceballos primarily focues on assisting Indian families with all areas of estate planning, encouraging them to make informed decisions about their property and drafting wills to conform to tribal, federal, and state law.  In addition to practicing law, Guadalupe assists with all aspects of the Center's programs, including student recruitment and retention, fund development, and community outreach and education.  Her interests include Federal Indian law, environmental law, and indigenous rights.  Prior to joining the Center, Guadalupe held positions in several departments at the School of Law, worked in several local law offices as a paralegal and interned for the Washington State House of Representatives.

Eric D. EberhardEric D. Eberhard

Distinguished Indian Law Practitioner in Residence, Co-faculty director

eberhare@seattleu.edu

Professor Eberhard has been actively engaged in the practice of Indian law since 1973, including employment in legal services on the Navajo, Hopi and White Mountain Apache reservations; as the Deputy Attorney General of the Navajo Nation and Executive Director of the Navajo Nation Washington Office, Staff Director and General Counsel to the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs and Legislative Counsel to Senator McCain. From 1995 to 2009 he was a partner in the Indian Law Practice Group in the Seattle office of Dorsey and Whitney LLP. His practice has involved the representation of Indian tribes, Tribal organizations, and entities doing business with Indian tribes in federal, state and tribal judicial, legislative and administrative forums in regard to fee-to-trust transfers, water rights, leasing of natural resources, federal contracting, gaming, federal recognition, the formation of Tribal corporations, environmental law, administrative law, jurisdiction, the development of tribal law, self-governance, cultural resource protection and the federal trust responsibility.

He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Morris K. Udall Foundation. He serves as the Vice-Chairman of the Native American Concerns Subcommittee of the American Bar Association's Committee on Individual Rights and Responsibilities and is a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.

Catherine O'Neill Professor Catherine O'Neill

Co-faculty director

oneillc@seattleu.edu

Professor O'Neill was a Ford Foundation Graduate Fellow at Harvard Law School. She came to the Northwest in 1992 as an environmental planner and air toxics coordinator for the Washington State Department of Ecology. From 1994 to1997, she was a Lecturer at the University of Washington School of Law. From 1997 to 2001, Professor O'Neill was Assistant, then Associate Professor at the University of Arizona College of Law. She joined the faculty in 2001.

Professor O'Neill's research focuses on issues of justice in environmental law and policy; in particular, her work considers the effects of contamination and depletion of fish and other resources relied upon by tribes and their members, communities of color and low-income communities. She has worked with the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council on its Fish Consumption Report; with various tribes in the Pacific Northwest and the Great Lakes on issues of contaminated fish and waters; and with environmental justice groups in the Southwest on air and water pollution issues. Professor O'Neill has testified before Congress on regulations governing mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. She has also served as a pro bono consultant to the attorneys for the National Congress of American Indians and other tribes in litigation challenging these mercury regulations. Professor O'Neill is a Member Scholar with the Center for Progressive Reform.

Professor O'Neill has published numerous scholarly articles, including Variable Justice: Environmental Standards, Contaminated Fish, and "Acceptable" Risk to Native Peoples (Stanford Environmental Law Journal, 2000); Mercury, Risk, and Justice (Environmental Law Reporter, 2004); and No Mud Pies: Risk Avoidance as Risk Regulation (Vermont Law Review, 2007).

Michael Mirande

Adjunct Professor

mmirande@nwlink.com

Michael Mirande was born in Mineola, N.Y. in 1953. After graduating from Duke University School of Law he clerked for the Honorable Gerald Bard Tjoflat, Chief Judge of the United States (then) 5th (now 11th) Circuit Court of Appeals. After practicing law in North Carolina, he taught two years at Duke University School of Law (Civil Procedure, Administrative Law, Professional Responsibility), and another year at the University of South Carolina School of Law (Civil Procedure and Federal Courts). In 1986 he began to practice law in Seattle with Bogle & Gates, where he became the Co-Chair of the firm’s Appellate Practice Group. For the past seven years he practiced with Miller Bateman LLP. He has practiced Indian Law for over twenty years.

Faculty Fellows

The Faculty Fellows for the Center for Indian Law and Policy support the Center's mission and provide valuable input, ideas and suggestions in pursuit of the Center's goals.  The Center's faculty fellows are: Catherine A. O'Neill, Professor of Law; Robert S. Chang, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Professor of Law; Lisa Brodoff, Director, Ronald A. Peterson Law Clinic and Associate Professor; Gregory Silverman, Professor of Law.

Advisory Committee 

The Center for Indian Law & Policy is honored to include the following individuals as Advisory Committee members: Gabriel S. Galanda, Galanda Broadman; Alix Foster, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community; Lisa Koop, Tulalip Tribes; Sarah Lawson, Snoqualmie Tribe; and Phil Katzen, Kanji & Katzen.

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