The "After Race" Project

To inaugurate its work in fostering cutting-edge interdisciplinary scholarship on issues of law and equality, the Korematsu Center is convening a group of scholars to be part of its “After Race” book project. These scholars, nominated Non-Resident Korematsu Faculty Fellows, will engage with each other for a three-year period on the topic “After Race” through a set of interrelated questions:

  • Do we live in a post-racial society?
  • Should we strive to live in a post-racial society?
  • What might it mean to live in a post-racial society?
  • What role ought the state play with regard to the role of race in society?
  • In a post-racial society, what might the salient social categories be?

We imagine that these questions might be engaged with regard to education, affirmative action, housing, employment, reparations, family, and identity.

Scholars participating in the program will workshop drafts of their papers at the law school and will later present their completed papers at a conference in Fall 2011 or Spring 2012. These conversations will lead ultimately to an anthology edited by Robert Chang.

For further information about the “After Race” Project, contact Center Director Robert Chang.

Contributing Scholars

Robert S. Chang

Robert S. Chang

Robert S. Chang is a Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law. He writes primarily in the area of race and interethnic relations and is the Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality.

Mario Barnes

Mario Barnes

Mario Barnes is a Professor of Law at University of California Irvine, School of Law. He writes and teaches in the areas of criminal law, constitutional law, national security law, and race and the law.

Laura E. Gomez

Laura E. Gómez

Laura E. Gómez is Professor of Law and American Studies at the University of New Mexico. She teaches in the areas of constitutional law, civil procedure, criminal law, law and society, and race and the law.

Angela P. Harris

Angela P. Harris

Angela Harris is a Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law and an Executive Committee Member at the Center for Social Justice. Her writing and research focus on feminist legal theory and critical race theory.

Jennifer Hochschild

Jennifer Hochschild

Jennifer Hochschild is the Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor Government and Professor of African and African American Studies, at Harvard University. She studies the intersection of American politics and political philosophy, with an emphasis on the areas of race, ethnicity, and immigration, educational policy, public opinion, and political culture.

Kevin R. Johnson

Kevin R. Johnson

Kevin R. Johnson is Dean, Professor of Law and Chicana/o Studies, and the Mabie-Apallas Public Interest Law Chair at the University of California at Davis. He has published extensively on immigration law and policy, racial identity, and civil rights in national and international journals.

Zeus Leonardo

Zeus Leonardo

Zeus Leonardo is an Associate Professor of Language and Literacy, Society and Culture at the University of California at Berkeley. His primary research interests include Cultural Studies, Democratic Education, Diversity, Ethnic Issues, Minorities, and Multicultural Education.

Angela Onwuachi-Willig

Angela Onwuachi-Willig

Angela Onwuachi-Willig is Professor of Law and the Charles M. and Marion J. Kierscht Scholar at the University of Iowa. Her research and teaching interests include family law, employment discrimination, race and the law, feminist legal theory, and evidence.

Vesla Weaver

Vesla Weaver

Vesla Mae Weaver is an Assistant Professor in the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics at the University of Virginia. She has written on topics including race and ethnic politics, immigration, social policy, electoral politics, political psychology, American political development, and the politics of inequality.