Faculty News

Winter 2013-14

Deborah Ahrens,Associate Professor of Law

  • She gave a CLE presentation, "Merchant of Venice: Understanding the Role of Judicial Bias in Decision-Making," at the William L. Dwyer chapter of the Inns of Court.

Janet Ainsworth, John D. Eshelman Professor of Law

  • Her book chapter, "Lost in Translation? Linguistic Diversity and the Elusive Quest for Plain Meaning in the Law," appearer in the Ashgate Handbook of Legal Translation.
  • She was a plenary speaker at the conference Language and the Law: Bridging the Gap, co-sponsored by the Faculty of Law and Faculty of Humanities and Social Science at the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina in Florianopolis Brazil. Her presentation was "Linguistic Diversity and the De-textualization of Law in Multi-lingual Legal Systems."
  • She is one of 10 scholars from around the world invited to participate in a spring colloquium at Harvard Law School on "Law as Living Language." The participants will address this topic from the perspective of various disciplines, including jurisprudence, anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, and cultural studies.
  • She has also been invited to sit on the editorial board of the trilingual journal Linguagem e Direito, and as a result of her work on the Libel Reform Campaign, she has been named to the Royal Libel Reform Commission in the U.K.

Tom Antkowiak, Associate Professor and Director, Latin America Program

  • His article, "Rights, Resources, and Rhetoric: Indigenous Peoples and the Inter-American Court," was published by the University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law.

Lori Bannai, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

  • Her essay, "Challenged X 3: The Stories of Women of Color Who Teach Legal Writing," has been accepted for publication by the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice. The essay will be published in the symposium issue responding to the book Presumed Incompetent, edited by Carmen González, et al., which explores issues faced by women of color in the academy.

Steven Bender, Professor of Law

  • With Francisco Valdes (Miami), he signed a contract with West publishing on behalf of LatCrit for a forthcoming coursebook, Critical Justice: Identities, Theories and Action, to be edited and written by a team of law professors including Carmen González and Tayyab Mahmud.

Bob Boruchowitz, Professor from Practice

  • He spoke at the 30th Anniversary Reception of the Washington Defender Association. He served as the founding president of WDA for 20 years.
  • His article, "Fifty Years after Gideon: It is Long Past Time to Provide Lawyers for Misdemeanor Defendants Who Cannot Afford to Hire their Own," was published in the Seattle Journal for Social Justice. It is part of a cluster of seven articles flowing from The Defender Initiative’s 2013 Conference on Public Defense recognizing the 50th anniversary of Gideon v. Wainwright.
  • He did a webinar entitled "It Really is Possible to Set and Enforce Caseload Limits — How Washington State Did It," for the National Association for Public Defense.
  • He moderated a panel and spoke on State Bar involvement at the Washington Experience at the American Bar Association Ninth Annual Summit on Indigent Defense Improvement in Chicago. A member of the ABA Indigent Defense Advisory Group, Professor Boruchowitz helped to organize three of the sessions at the summit.

Mary Bowman, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills and Associate Director of the Legal Writing Program

  • She was elected to the Executive Committee of the AALS Section on Legal Writing, Research, and Reasoning.

Margaret Chon, Donald and Lynda Horowitz Professor for the Pursuit of Justice

  • She presented a key point talk at a joint conference of the Open African Innovation Research and Training Project and the Third Annual Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest, held at the University of Capetown. Her talk, "Leveraging Logos for Development," addressed the topic of brands, fair trade certification, geographical indications, trademarks, traditional knowledge, and development.
  • She published a chapter in the book Trademark Protection And Territoriality Challenges In A Global Economy, edited by Professors Irene Calboli and Edward Lee. The chapter is called, "Marks and More(s): Certification in Global Value Chains."

Annette Clark, Dean and Professor of Law

  • She was a panelist at the AALS Dean's session, "Managing the Transformation of Legal Education: Lessons from other Disciplines." She discussed the lessons to be learned from medical education/training.

Brooke Coleman, Associate Professor of Law

  • She testified at the Federal Civil Rules Hearing in Phoenix, Arizona, regarding the proposed abrogation of Civil Rule 84 and the Official Forms.
  • Her blog post "The Real Cost of Litigation Reform: Justice, Not Discovery Costs, Are at Stake," was featured on the ACS Blog.

Diane Lourdes Dick, Assistant Professor of Law

  • She was selected to attend the Workshop for Law Professors on Risk, Injury, Liability and Insurance in Duck Key, Florida. The program's sponsor is the George Mason University Law & Economics Center.

Gillian Dutton, Externship Program Director and Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

  • She and and Elizabeth Ford discussed assessment and curriculum development in externships at The Externship 7 conference in Denver.

Anne Enquist, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Director of the Legal Writing Program

  • She was a plenary speaker at the Innovation and Leadership One-Day Workshop at the University of Oregon. She gave the closing presentation, "Developing the Next Generation of Legal Writing Leaders."

Elizabeth Ford, Visiting Assistant Professor and Associate Director Externship Program

  • She presented on political negotiation techniques to the Washington State Human Services Lobbying coalition.

Charlotte Garden, Assistant Professor of Law

  • She co-authored (with Matthew Bodie, St. Louis University) an amicus brief for the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of more than 30 labor law professors in support of the union and state respondents in Harris v. Quinn. Harris concerns the constitutionality of aspects of Illinois's law permitting Medicaid-funded home health care workers to unionize.

Carmen González , Professor of Law

  • She was a co-organizer of the Hot Topic/Bridge Program, "Enhancing the Law School Climate for Faculty and Students of Color: What Academic Leaders Need to Know," at the 2014 AALS Conference.

John B. Kirkwood, Associate Dean for Strategic Planning and Mission and Professor of Law

  • He spoke on the Antitrust and Economic Regulation panel at the 2014 AALS Conference. Composed of current and former officials of the Federal Trade Commission, the panel provided an animated assessment of the agency on its 100th anniversary.
  • His article, "The Essence of Antitrust," was selected as a finalist for the 2014 Antitrust Writing Awards given by Concurrences, an international competition journal. His article, "Rethinking the Antitrust Treatment of RPM," resulted in an interview with a consultant for the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry in Japan, who decided to recommend that METI adopt one of its proposals. Finally, his article, "Powerful Buyers and Merger Enforcement," was chosen as a reading for Einer Elhauge's antitrust seminar at Harvard.
  • He signed an amicus brief by a group of law professors that opposed a blanket exemption for insurance rates filed with state regulators. The exemption would immunize the rates from antitrust attack even if they were set collusively and not reviewed by the state. He also became a regular contributor to Global Intelligence in Antitrust/Competition Law, a publication of the Financial Times Group.

Paula Lustbader, Professor of Law, Director of the Academic Resource Center, and President of Robert's Fund

  • She presented "Masters at Work: The Many Facets of Effective Teaching" at a session on Teaching Methods at the 2014 AALS Conference.

Tayyab Mahmud, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Justice

  • He presented "Occupy Debt: Default as Resistance" at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Socio-Economics at the 2014 AALS Conference.
  • The Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ) gave its 2013 Best Special Issue Award to American Quarterly for the special issue on "Race, Empire and the Crisis of the Subprime." This issue, which carried Tayyab's article, "Debt and Discipline," has also been published as a book by Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • He presented "Caught Between the Lines: Colonial Cartography, Geopolitics and Pakistan," at the South Asia Institute 2014 Seminar Series at the University of Texas at Austin. He also presented "Human Rights Constitutionalism and the Colonial Exception" at the Human Rights Constitutionalism: Global Aspirations, Local Realities Conference at Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice, University of Texas at Austin School of Law.
  • He participated in a roundtable discussion aired by Voice of America International Service about the deadlock at the second round of Geneva Talks on Syria.

Natasha Martin, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Associate Professor of Law

  • She was selected from a nationwide call for papers as a presenter at the upcoming Title VII at 50 Symposium in New York.
  • She was elected as an officer on the Executive Committee of the AALS Employment Discrimination Law Section. She was also invited to join the 2015 AALS Professional Responsibility Section Program Committee and has been invited to serve as moderator of the PR section's program at the 2015 annual meeting, which will explore the new competencies that lawyers should have in order to comply with their ethical obligations in the rapidly changing legal marketplace of the 21st century.

Laurel Currie Oates, Professor of Law

  • She attended and presented at the GAGE conference, held at Jindal University in India, just north of New Delhi. Professor Oates's presentation focused on the failures of first generation rule of law projects and hopes for second generation projects. After the conference, Professor Oates conducted one-day workshops at Symbiosis and Amity Law Schools and was a guest of honor at a conference on Honour Killings held at Amity.
  • She also presented "Reading Comprehension in the Age of Twitter: Teaching Law Students to Read for Meaning and Materiality" at the Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research at the 2014 AALS Conference.

Catherine O'Neill, Professor of Law

  • Along with current students and SU alumni, she attended a day-long event marking the 40th anniversary of the landmark decision by Judge Boldt in the treaty rights litigation, U.S. v. Washington. The event was hosted by the Squaxin Island tribe.
  • She was invited to attend a small meeting between academics working on environmental justice issues and senior staff from the U.S. EPA headquarters, who were in Seattle. She arranged a separate meeting, between the EPA staff and community representatives at the law school – affording an opportunity for students in her Environmental Justice seminar to observe the proceedings, as well as enabling SU to serve as host to this important regional social justice event.

Sara Rankin, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

  • She will present on collaborative approaches to teaching legislative advocacy at a one-day workshop, "Bringing Outside In: Social Justice Collaborations in the Legal Writing Curriculum" in Philadelphia.
  • Her work in progress, "Prime Suspects," which discusses social and legal issues affecting homeless Americans, has been accepted for presentation at the Law & Society Annual Meeting in Minneapolis.
  • She has been invited by the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty to co-author a report on homeless bills of rights. The report, which will be distributed to homeless advocates nationwide, will be published through NCLHP this month.
  • She was invited by the Seattle University Faith & Family Homelessness Project to present her legal advocacy work relating to homeless people and to discuss ongoing collaborations with various university and non-university partners to advance the rights of homeless people in the Pacific Northwest.
  • She is launching a new Legislative Law Blog on the Law Professor Blogs Network. The blog will focus on legislative and administrative advocacy and policymaking. Professor Rankin is joined by three co-editors: Professor Joel Rogers (Wisconsin), Emily Benfer (Loyola Chicago), and Kevin Barry (Quinnipiac).

Anna Roberts, Assistant Professor of Law

  • She presented a forthcoming article, "Impeachment by Unreliable Conviction," at a Criminal Law Colloquium hosted by SMU Dedman School of Law.
  • She has been invited to address the American Judges Association on the topic of implicit juror bias. The presentation will take place at the AJA's Annual Conference in Las Vegas.
  • She presented her article, "Impeachment by Unreliable Conviction," at a faculty workshop at the University of Georgia Law School.

James Rosenfeld, Director, Education Law Programs; Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

  • He organized a program that featured the Honorable Tani Cantil-Sakauye, the Chief Justice of the State of California, as speaker. The weeklong program, held in Sacramento, offered training in decision-making, bias reduction, ethics, communications during hearings, mediation and other subjects to 100 general jurisdiction and special education administrative law judges. The program was organized for the California Office of Administrative Hearings under the auspices of the IDEA Academy for Administrative Law Judges and Impartial Hearing Officers.

Ron Slye, Professor of Law

  • He negotiated a multi-million dollar contract between the Documentation Center of Cambodia and Zaha Hadid Architects. The contract provides for Zaha Hadid to design a world-class research center and memorial (to be called Sleuk Rith) concerning the atrocities committed during the Khmer Rouge period in Cambodia from 1975 to 1979, during which over 2 million Cambodians died. This will be the first such memorial designed by a female architect, and the first to be designed by someone who is not a member of the victim population.

Denis Stearns, Professor from Practice

  • He has accepted an invitation to be a presenter and panelist at a conference at the UCLA School of Law. The conference is sponsored by the law school and the UCLA Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy. He will present on the history of food litigation and its effectiveness in protecting consumers, based on a book he is currently writing.
  • He presented a draft of his article, "Turning a Black Swan White: Questioning the Need for Regulation of Non-Industrial Agriculture," at a conference at Harvard Law School.

George Van Cleve, Visiting Professor in Law and History

  • He accepted an offer to publish his article, "Parting Companies: The Glorious Revolution, the Enforcement Powers of the East India and Royal African Companies, and Imperial Mercantilism, 1672-1712," in The Historical Journal (U.K.) (co-authored with Dr. William A. Pettigrew, University of Kent).
  • He presented a lecture, "The United States Constitution: Past and Present," to the American Studies program at the University of Kent (Canterbury, U.K.). He will also present a seminar paper, "The Changing Constitution of the English Trading Corporation and the Growth of Empire, 1600-1700," to the University of Kent graduate history seminar. One of the principal issues the paper will address is the early history of shareholder liability for corporate debts.

Cliff Villa, Adjunct Professor

  • In conjunction with the SU Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability, he helped organize and host a benefit concert to raise money to help rebuild the School of the SEA, an environmental education center in the Philippines that was severely damaged by Typhoon Haiyan last fall. Professor Villa will travel to the Philippines to deliver a presentation on disaster law to a conference of Filipino law professors and to celebrate the reopening of the School of the SEA on Earth Day.

Lisa Young, Adjunct

  • She chaired the 2014 AALS Academic Support Section's Program, Early Intervention for At-Risk Students. She also moderated the panel presentation, which explored programs and methods for supporting at-risk students with academic and bar success, the important issue of "stereotype threat," and how "Hope Theory" can be used to predict student performance. Lisa was elected as chair-elect for the AALS Section on Academic Support.

Fall 2013

Bryan Adamson, Associate Professor of Law

  • His chapter, "A Criminal Practitioner's Guide to the Media in Client Representation," has been released as part of the ABA's book "Media Coverage in Criminal Justice Cases."

Deborah Ahrens, Associate Professor of Law

  • She and Brooke Coleman presented at the Rocky Mountain Junior Scholars Conference at BYU School of Law.

Lorraine Bannai, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

  • She was part of a panel addressing "Indefinite Detention without Due Process" at Seattle Town Hall. Her remarks commented on the WWII incarceration of Japanese Americans and the Hedges v. Obama litigation which challenged the indefinite detention provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act.
  • She was appointed to a four-year term on the State Minority and Justice Commission, a commission of the Washington Supreme Court whose mission is to address issues of racial and ethnic bias in the Washington court system.

Steve Bender, Professor of Law

  • He presented his forthcoming book "How Could We? Regret and the Pursuit of Humanity," at a law faculty lunch talk and an evening public forum at the Gonzaga School of Law. He also discussed the book during a plenary panel for the Law and Society retreat at the University of Washington School of Law. The book will be published next summer by New York University Press.
  • His latest law review article, "Equity in Times of Mortgage Crisis" will be published by The ABA Real Property, Trust and Estate Journal.
  • He spoke at the forum, "Washington's Marijuana Law: A Mexican Perspective," at the law school.

Robert C. Boruchowitz, Professor from Practice

  • He led a small group discussion at the inaugural meeting of the National Association for Public Defense at the University of Dayton Law School. More than 30 defender leaders from 21 states attended the working session to start the new organization.
  • Along with Professor John Strait, he published a commentary in the King County Bar Bulletin, "Division Autonomy Crucial in Defender Restructuring." They produced the article with Phil Ginsberg, of counsel at Hackett Beecher and Hart.
  • He spoke on a panel at Harvard Law School's symposium, Meeting the Mandate for Indigent Defense. He spoke about successful efforts to obtain counsel in misdemeanor cases and the development of defender standards in Washington.

Mary Bowman, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills and Associate Director of the Legal Writing Program

  • She was named to the Board of Editorial Advisors for the Third Edition of Bryan Garner's "The Redbook: A Manual on Legal Style." In that role, she was an invited contributor during the editorial process for the new edition of the book.

Deirdre Bowen, Associate Professor of Law

  • She presented at the opening plenary about Critical Race Theory at the West Coast Law & Society Retreat held at the University of Washington School of Law.
  • Her essay "Windsor's Purgatory: State DOMAs Can't Stabilize Straight Marriages, but They Can Still Prevent Gay Marriage" was published in the online journal of the Denver Law Review. This essay is a preview of her law review article that will be published next year.
  • She presented her paper "All that Heaven will Allow: A Comparison between States that allow Same Sex Marriage and Those that Ban It" at the Lat/Crit Conference in Chicago.
  • Her panel proposal, Innovative Techniques to Stimulate Student Curiosity for Community Engagement in Domestic and International Settings, has been accepted in a competitive process for the Midyear AALS clinical conference on legal education.

Margaret Chon, Donald and Lynda Horowitz Professor for the Pursuit of Justice

  • She gave a talk at Lewis & Clark Law School's "IP in the Trees" series. The talk was based on her forthcoming article and book chapter, "Slow Logo: Brand Citizenship in Global Value Networks." It is scheduled to be published in the UC Davis Law Review and the Sage Handbook of Intellectual Property.
  • She published a chapter in Methods and Perspectives in Intellectual Property, edited by Graeme B. Dinwoodie. Based on her sabbatical project, the chapter describes whether and how public-private partnerships contribute to public interest goals in global intellectual property law.
  • She spoke at a symposium, "The Global Medicine Challenge: The Fine Line Between Incentivizing Innovation and Protecting Human Rights," at Whittier Law School.

Annette Clark, Dean and Professor of Law

  • She moderated a panel, "Deciding to Become a Dean" at the Promoting Diversity in Law School Leadership Workshop held at UW School of Law.

Ronald Clark, Adjunct Professor

  • He made a four-hour presentation on "Winning Opening Statements and Closing Arguments" for the Erie Institute of Law in Buffalo, New York.
  • He and Professor Emeritus Marilyn J. Berger were invited to publish with Bloomberg BNA in the Litigation Practice Series. The publications were referred to as portfolios with a target audience of corporate counsel, primarily in the Fortune 500. Berger and Clark were selected from academia to write in this series based on their Pretrial, Trial Advocacy, and Evidence books published by Wolters Kluwer. The Berger-Clark Portfolio is part of the Litigation Practice Series which provides well-focused assistance on topics germane to litigators. Each portfolio combines exhaustive research with practitioners' expert guidance.

Diane Lourdes Dick, Assistant Professor of Law

  • She spoke about current trends in legal opinions practice in commercial financing transactions at the Washington State Bar Association's Real Property, Probate & Trust Fall CLE in downtown Seattle.
  • She also presented her work and served as a discussant at the Pacific West Business Law Scholars Colloquium, hosted by the University of Oregon School of Law.
  • She conducted an hour-long session on legal opinions in commercial financing transactions at the 20th Annual Fall Real Estate Seminar, hosted by the Washington State Bar Association.

Gillian Dutton, Externship Program Director and Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

  • She presented with Liz Ford on Innovative Curriculum Reform in the Seattle University Law School Externship Program at the Northwest Clinical Law Conference in Leavenworth, Washington. She was also a panelist on the topic of "Overcoming Isolation & Exclusion: Promoting Access to Justice for Language Minorities" at the LatCrit conference in Chicago.
  • She provided a training on Cultural Competence and Implicit Bias at the staff retreat of Columbia Legal Services. She also provided comments on language access provisions in the Washington Administrative Code proposed regulations implementing the Affordable Care Act in Washington State.

Charlotte Garden, Assistant Professor of Law

  • She presented her article, "Meta Rights," at Washington University Law School's faculty workshop series, and at the Fourth Annual Constitutional Law Colloquium, held at Loyola Law School in Chicago.

Margaret Fisher, Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

  • She will present on teaching immigration issues at the American Bar Association Law-Related Education Leadership Conference in Atlanta.
  • She received the Sandra Day O'Connor Award at the fall judicial college.
  • She organized the annual statewide youth court training. This included adult and youth members of seven of the established youth courts: Bellevue Youth Court, Bothell Youth Court, Cheney Youth Traffic Court, Clallam County Teen Court, Shoreline/Lake Forest Park Youth Traffic Court, Seattle Youth Traffic Court, and the Whatcom County Teen Court. Joining them were judicial-community-youth teams from three new communities interested in launching their own courts.
  • She agreed to serve as an academic reviewer of a major revision to a U.S. Government textbook for high school students published by McGraw-Hill Education.

Elizabeth Ford, Visiting Assistant Professor and Associate Director Externship Program

  • She facilitated a collective bargaining summit for leadership of Fire Department and Fire Fighter Associations from across Washington State sponsored by the Association of Washington Cities, Washington Council of Firefighters, and Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs.

Carmen González, Professor of Law

Lily Kahng, Professor of Law

    • Her essay "The IRS Tea Party Controversy and IRS Discretion" was published by the Cornell Law Review Online.
    • She presented her paper "IRS Discretion: Uses and Abuses" at the University of Washington Law School Tax Symposium.
    • Her article "Path Dependence and Tax Subsidies for Home Sales" was published by the Alabama Law Review. She also made a presenation on this same topic at the USC-Dalhousie Law and Public Policy Workshop, at USC Law School.

John Kirkwood, Associate Dean for Strategic Planning and Mission and Professor of Law

      • He delivered the keynote luncheon address at the American Antitrust Institute's Private Antitrust Enforcement Conference in Washington, D.C. At AAI's request, he presented his Cohen Award winning article, "Powerful Buyers and Merger Enforcement."

Tayyab Mahmud, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Justice

      • He gave a presentation, "Who Gives a Dam(n)!: Geopolitics, Postcoloniality and the Green Revolution," on a panel on food justice and spearheaded a graduate student workshop at the West Coast Law & Society Retreat. He participated in a panel discussion about foreign policy decision making following a showing of the play "The Realm of Whispering Ghosts: If Truman Met Einstein."
      • His presentation, "Producing Homo Economicus Under Market Discipline: Neoliberal Re-Formation of Higher Education" was part of the theme plenary on austerity and law schools at LatCrit 2013 Conference in Chicago. He also presented "Legal Realism and After: An Introduction to LatCrit Theory, Community and Praxis" at LatCrit/SALT Junior Faculty Development Workshop.
      • He made a presentation, "Political Economy of Security," at the Economics Department of Seattle University. He also presented a paper, "Grasping Debt: Towards Decolonization of Time," at the opening plenary of ClassCrit VI Workshop "Stuck in Forward: Austerity and the Possibilities of the Political" at Southwestern Law School.

Natasha Martin, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Associate Professor of Law

      • She moderated two panels at the Promoting Diversity in Law School Leadership Workshop held at UW School of Law, "Understanding and Addressing the Presumption of Incompetence" and "Associate Deans."
      • She presented "Virtual Workplace Culture: Promise or Peril?" at the Labor and Employment Law Scholarship Colloquium at the William S. Boyd School of Law, University of Las Vegas.

Catherine O'Neill, Professor of Law

      • She delivered one of the plenary talks at the Tribal Environmental Leaders Summit in Spokane. The conference brought together tribal leaders and staff working on environmental issues in Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and Alaska. O'Neill's presentation was titled "Fishable Waters: Recent Developments in Protecting Tribal Rights."
      • She delivered the keynote talk for the plenary session at the Lake Roosevelt Forum conference in Spokane. The interdisciplinary conference addressed issues of environmental and natural resources management in the Upper Columbia Basin. Catherine’s talk was "Clean Waters, Healthy Fish: Washington's Regulatory Effort."

Karena Rahall, Visiting Assistant Professor of Law

      • She accepted an offer to publish her article, “The Siren Is Calling: Economic and Ideological Trends Toward Privatization of Public Police Forces,” in the University of Miami Law Review.

Sara Rankin, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

      • She accepted an offer to publish her article, "Invidious Deliberation: The Problem of Congressional Bias in Federal Hate Crime Legislation," in Rutgers Law Review.
      • She presented her work in progress, "A Homeless Rights (Revolution)" in Chicago at the 2013 Biennial LatCrit Conference, "Resistance Rising: Theorizing and Building Cross-Sector Movements."
      • Her presentation, "Can Law Schools Prepare Students to be Practice Ready?" was published as a transcript in the most recent volume of the Chapman Law Review.
      • Her article co-authored with Lisa Brodoff and Mary Bowman, "We Have a Dream: Integrating Skills Courses and Public Interest Work in the First Year of Law School (and Beyond)," was published in the Chapman Law Review.
      • Her article, "The Fully Formed Lawyer: Why Law Schools Should Require Public Service to Better Prepare Students for Private Practice," was published in the Chapman Law Review.

J. Christopher Rideout, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Associate Director of the Legal Writing Program

      • His article, "A Twice-Told Tale: Plausibility and Narrative Coherence in Judicial Storytelling," was published in the Volume 10 (Fall 2013) issue of Legal Communication and Rhetoric.
      • He presented an in-house CLE on drafting licensing and user agreements for the legal department at Amazon.com. The half-day workshop included lawyers from Amazon's offices in the U.S., U.K., Europe, and Asia.
      • Two of his previously published articles have been reprinted in the Legal Writing Institute Monograph Series, Volume 3: Teaching Legal Writing - Theory (2013). The articles are "Legal Writing: A Revised View," originally published in the Washington Law Review in 1994, and "Voice, Self, and Persona in Legal Writing," originally published in Legal Writing in 2009.

Tracey Roberts, Visiting Assistant Professor

      • She delivered her paper, "Energy Industry Tax Subsidies, A Comparative Approach," at the Loyola Law School Tax Policy Colloquium.

Anna Roberts, Assistant Professor of Law

      • She accepted an offer to publish her article, "Impeachment by Unreliable Conviction," in the Boston College Law Review.
      • She presented that article at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology held in Atlanta. It has also been identified by The Academic Advisory Board of the Getting Scholarship into Court Project for inclusion on its "must read" list — a list of articles selected as especially useful to courts and practitioners. The National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers will highlight the article in The Champion (its monthly magazine), on its website, and in its e-newsletter.

Jim Rosenfeld, Director, Education Law Programs; Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

      • He was chosen by the California Office of Administrative Hearings to organize and administer training for all of its administrative law judges in Sacramento.

Julie Shapiro, Professor of Law

      • She made a presentation on "Constitutional Claims in Instances of Assisted Reproduction," for the American Academy of Adoption Attorneys annual meeting in Charleston, S.C.

David Skover, Fredric C. Tausend Professor of Law

      • He published "A Constitutional Camerado Inspires Us to Read Our Founding Document," a review of Garrett Epps' "American Epic: Reading the U.S. Constitution" (Oxford University Press, 2013), for the Washington Independent Review of Books.
      • He has agreed to be co-editor, with his longtime colleague Ronald Collins, of SCOTUS Books-in-Brief, a series that will foster scholarly e-books written by prominent Constitutional Law scholars and practitioners on current and controversial Supreme Court decisions.
      • He signed a contract with SCOTUS Books-in-Brief to publish the first such book (with Ronald Collins), "When Money Speaks: The McCutcheon Case, Campaign Finance Law, and the First Amendment." The work is largely being written in advance of the Supreme Court ruling in McCutcheon v. FEC and will issue within four days of the Court's decision.

Ron Slye, Professor of Law

      • He participated in a symposium in Berlin co-sponsored by Transparency International and Freedom House on the intersection between transitional justice and anti-corruption practices. Professor Slye moderated a panel on Achieving Legal Accountability and Reparations and presented and led a discussion on "Establishing a More Complete Truth: The Role of Commissions in Exposing Large-scale Corruption and Economic Crimes."

Denis Stearns, Professor from Practice

      • He has authored a chapter, "Food as a Product," for the Product Liability Deskbook, to be published by the Washington State Association for Justice (formerly WSTLA).
      • He presented his paper, "A Continuing Plague," at a symposium on Safety and Sustainability in the Era of Food Systems: Reaching a More Integrated Approach. The symposium in Madison, Wisc., was sponsored by the Wisconsin Law Review and held in conjunction with the annual conference of the American Agricultural Law Association. He also moderated a panel on labor and property law issues where two other papers were presented.
      • He signed a contract as part of a grant funded by the USDA and the Minnesota Department of Health to work as an advisor for the Public Health Law Center at the William Mitchell College of Law in the development of a series of white papers on the regulation of food safety, food product liability, and farm-to-school and school-garden programs.
      • He has accepted an invitation to present his recent ongoing scholarship at a symposium at Harvard Law School (HLS). His presentation is entitled, "Turning a Black Swan White: Questioning the Need for Regulation of Non-Industrial Agriculture." The symposium is being sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics; the HLS Food Law and Policy Clinic; and Professor Jake Gerson, who will next year be starting the HLS Food Law Lab to encourage more scholarship in this area.

John Strait, Associate Professor of Law

      • Along with Robert C. Boruchowitz, he assisted in Wilbur et al v. City of Mount Vernon and City of Burlington, U.S. District Court, Western District of Washington before Judge Lasnik. This is the first systemic §1983 challenge in federal court of municipal public defender offices that have been denying the effective assistance of counsel to indigent defendants since the Monell case in 1987. The ACLU, with the assistance of local counsel Perkins Coie and Terrell, Marshall, Daudt, and Willie, PLLC, allege that the cities' contracts were so deficient that they collectively provided all indigent defendants in the municipal courts with constitutionally deficient representation. The case was based upon research developed by Professor Boruchowitz with student assistance. Professor Strait testified as an expert witness on Sixth Amendment Effective Assistance of Counsel and the constitutional standards to be applied to these public defender systems.

Cliff Villa, Professor from Practice

      • He was invited to join a team of environmental law faculty to undertake work on a 5th edition of Professor Frank Grad's foundational casebook, "Environmental Law."
      • His latest scholarly work, "Law and Lawyers in the Incident Command System," appears in the current issue of the Seattle University Law Review.
      • He currently serves as the law school's representative on the Steering Committee for the Seattle University Center for Environmental Justice and Sustainability.
      • He was honored at Lewis & Clark Law School with recognition as a Distinguished Environmental Graduate.

Lisa Young, Adjunct

      • She co-chaired the West Coast Consortium of Academic Support Professionals Teaching, Scholarship, and Service Conference at the University of San Diego. She also presented, "Empowering Success: Crafting Personal Goals, Objectives, and Creating a Personal Board of Directors."
      • She was invited to be an editor of The Learning Curve, the official publication of the AALS Section on Academic Support. The Learning Curve is a biannual publication that showcases brief articles treating theoretical or practical ideas related to student support and teaching excellence.

Summer 2013

Janet Ainsworth, John D. Eshelman Professor of Law

      • Her article, “What’s Wrong with Pink Pearls and Cornrow Braids?: Employee Dress Codes and the Semiotic Performance of Race and Gender in the Workplace,” was published in Law, Culture and Visual Studies (Anne Wagner and Richard Sherwin, eds.).
      • She also made presentations at the following conferences: Southeastern Association of Law Schools Annual Conference, West Coast Roundtable of Language and the Law, and the International Association of Forensic Linguistics Biennial Meeting.
      • As a member of the Libel Reform Campaign, she co-authored a white paper criticizing “libel tourism” and the lack of public interest and scholarly research defenses in UK libel law.
      • She served as an international collaborator on a proposal for Centre for the Study of Civil Society (conceptual, empirical, and theoretical research on civil society, social capital, and civic participation in comparative international perspective) through the UK Economic and Social Research Council.

Tom Antkowiak, Associate Professor and Director of the Latin America Program

      • He and Diana Singleton, director of the Access to Justice Institute, presented at Seattle University's Engaging Poverty conference on Legal Education and Poverty.

Lori Bannai, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

      • She provided a historical and legal overview of the WWII Japanese American incarceration in introducing the panel "Hirabayashi, Korematsu, and Yasui: Family Perspectives" at the Japanese American National Museum conference in Seattle.
      • She and Stephanie Wilson jointly presented "Law Libraries and Advocacy: Using Special Collections to Tell the Story of the Japanese American Internment" at the American Association of Law Libraries annual conference. Their presentation covered the law library's exhibits about Fred T. Korematsu and Gordon Hirabayashi and the how librarians provided extensive research to support the Seattle University Honorary Degree Program spearheaded by Lori and the Korematsu Center.

Bob Boruchowitz, Professor from Practice

      • He attended the Soros Fellows gathering in Marina del Rey, Calif. Among topics discussed were the implications of the Zimmerman killing of Trayvon Martin and the future of criminal justice. He also spent a week in Idaho working with the ACLU to assess public defense services in two counties.

Deirdre Bowen, Associate Professor of Law

      • She was invited to present on a plenary panel about Critical Race Theory and Empirical Methodology at the West Coast Law & Society Retreat.
      • She presented her work at the Emerging Family Law Scholars and Teachers Conference. She also presented ways in which to bring empirical studies into the Family Law classroom in order to allow for a deeper understanding of the law as well as increasing students' legal analytical skills.
      • Her essay, "Windsor's Purgatory," appeared in the online journal of the Denver Law Review and previews her forthcoming article mentioned below.
      • Her article, "All that Heaven will Allow: A Statistical Analysis of the Coexistence of Same Sex Marriage and Gay Matrimonial Bans," will be published early next year in Denver Law Review.
      • She was invited to present on the SALT/LatCrit Faculty Development Program scholarship panel. This program provides mentorship to aspiring as well as junior law professors heading on to the law school market. She will discuss ways to engage in interdisciplinary scholarship.
      • She traveled to Istanbul as part of a group of law professors asked to examine social, family and gendered potential effects of disasters. She will write a scholarly article providing recommendations on how to address gender and family issues in a post-disaster situation.

Lisa Brodoff, Director, Ronald A. Peterson Law Clinic and Associate Professor

      • She spoke on the Hot Topics panel at the Washington State Elder Law Section's Summer Social. She talked about the demise of the Defense of Marriage Act and its impact on representation and advice for elder clients in same-sex relationships.

Robert Chang, Professor and Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

      • He served as a commentator at a workshop at Stanford Law School on a new race and law casebook.

Kristin Cheney, Associate Dean for Library and Educational Technology Librarian

      • She co-presented an afternoon workshop, "Get Hired: How to Convey Your Value" at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Conference.

Margaret Chon, Donald and Lynda Horowitz Professor for the Pursuit of Justice

      • She is participating in a symposium for the contributors of the forthcoming Sage Handbook of Intellectual Property hosted by the University of Durham.
      • She is convening a Dialogue on Public-Private Partnerships in Global Intellectual Property Governance, hosted in collaboration with the International Centre on Trade and Sustainable Development in Geneva.

Annette Clark, Dean, Professor of Law

      • She was invited to speak as a panelist at the Deans' Open Forum at the AALS Annual Meeting in New York City in January 2014. The subject of the panel discussion is "Managing the Transformation of Legal Education — Lessons from Other Disciplines."

Ronald Clark, Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

      • The Fourth Edition of "Pretrial Advocacy: Planning, Analysis and Strategy," coauthored by Clark, Marilyn Berger, and John Mitchell was just published by Wolters Kluwer Law and Business. The book is widely adopted. It includes a DVD of depositions, mediation materials and two CDs with additional professional materials.
      • He was the featured lecturer and a faculty member for the University of Montana School of Law's 25th Annual week-long Advanced Trial Advocacy Program.

Brooke Coleman, Assistant Professor

      • She reviewed Lonny Hoffman's article, "Rulemaking in the Age of Twombly and Iqbal" (forthcoming U.C. Davis Law Review), for JOTWELL Courtslaw.

Richard Delgado, Professor of Law

      • He had an article accepted by Michigan Law Review's online supplement, First Impressions. The article opens a symposium commemorating the career and contributions of Mari Matsuda.
      • His and Jean Stefancic’s widely used coursebook "Critical Race Theory: The Cutting Edge" was published in a new edition by Temple University Press.
      • His and Jean Stefancic’s completed month-long residencies at Centrum, a writers and artists colony on the Olympic Peninsula, where Jean completed an article on the female companions of the Beat generation of writers for a symposium issue of Seattle University Law Review.
      • His completed an article, titled Two Narratives of Youth, for the same symposium, and another on a controversy in Tucson, Arizona over teaching Mexican American Studies in the public schools, for North Carolina Law Review. He also wrote separate articles for Michigan Law Review and its online companion, First Impressions.

Diane Lourdes Dick, Assistant Professor of Law

      • She co-presented, along with Keith Trefry of Paine Hamblen LLP, at "Around the World of Business Law: 80 Things Every Washington Lawyer Must Know," sponsored by the Business Law Section of the Washington State Bar Association. Diane and Keith spoke on legal opinions in corporate and real estate financing transactions, and also co-authored a chapter of the CLE materials.
      • Her invited symposium contribution, "Legal Ethics, Commercial Practice and the Certainty Imperative: A Cautionary Note," was published in the Northern Kentucky Law Review.
      • She spoke on new developments impacting legal opinions in corporate and real estate financing transactions, and authored a chapter in the accompanying CLE materials at the Mid-Year Meeting of the Washington State Bar Association Real Property, Probate & Trust Section.
      • She presented her scholarly work in progress, The Chapter 11 Tax Loophole, at the National Business Law Scholars Conference at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law.
      • She presented her paper, "Bankruptcy's Corporate Tax Loophole," at the Southeastern Association of Law Schools annual meeting and accepted an offer to publish that paper in the Fordham Law Review. She was also invited by the American Bankruptcy Institute to do a podcast on the topics addressed in her article.

Eric Eberhard, Distinguished Indian Law Practitioner in Residence

      • He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Northwest Indian Bar Association. He was also honored by the Makah Tribe with a special presentation and gift of a traditional Northwest Indian painting for his pro bono service to the Makah Tribe that led to the negotiation of an agreement between the Tribe and the U.S. Coast Guard to address the protection of the coastal and inland marine waters used by the protection and the implementation of recently enacted federal legislation intended to prevent oil spills in those waters.

Margaret Fisher, Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

      • She conducted a three-day Judicial Institute for High School Teachers in conjunction with the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington.
      • She hosted the three-day iCivics Institute for Teachers at the U.S. Court in Seattle from to assist teachers in learning how to use the online civics curriculum launched by Justice O'Connor and to educate them about the federal judiciary and federal legal issues.
      • She conducted a training session for judge-teacher teams to implement Street Law in locations throughout Washington, building on a program begun 10 years ago. This year's new sites are in Stephenson, Curlew, Covington, and Spokane.

Christian Halliburton, Associate Professor of Law

      • He spoke at the Western District of Washington’s Federal Bar Association Annual Meeting and CLE at the Federal Courthouse in Seattle. Christian’s presentation, "DOMA, Prop. 8, and the Federalism Implications of Same-Sex Marriage," provided a basic overview of two cases before the Supreme Court, US v. Windsor and Hollingsworth v. Perry.

Lily Kahng, Professor of Law

      • She accepted an offer from the Cornell Law Review Online to publish an essay on the IRS Tea Party scandal.
      • She agreed to contribute a chapter called Thor Power and Judicial Impotence to a forthcoming book, "Controversies in Tax Law" (Anthony C. Infanti, ed.).
      • She presented her article, Path Dependence in Tax Subsidies for Home Sales (to be published in the Alabama Law Review in October 2013) at the Critical Tax Conference at Hastings Law School and the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting.
      • She was reappointed by the Senate Democratic caucus to the Washington State Citizen Commission for Performance Measurement of Tax Preferences after a year-long absence. The commission is charged with overseeing the periodic independent review of all state tax preferences, which number more than 600. The review process assesses whether the preferences carry out their intended purpose, evaluates their cost and economic impacts, and makes recommendations to retain, modify, or terminate the preferences.

Jack Kirkwood, Professor of Law

      • He addressed "Merger Retrospective Program Design" at the Symposium on Retrospective Analysis of Agency Determinations in Merger Transactions sponsored by the ABA Antitrust Section, OECD, and George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C.
      • He was invited to be the keynote luncheon speaker at the American Antitrust Institute conference on private antitrust enforcement to be held in Washington, D.C. He was also invited to speak on the Antitrust Section panel at AALS. The topic will be the 100th anniversary of the Federal Trade Commission.

Connie Krontz, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

      • She co-authored an online companion chapter to the “Interactive Citation Workbook for The Bluebook” that focused on constructing citations using the Washington Style Sheet.

Tayyab Mahmud, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Justice

      • He presented "Capitalism, Colonialism and Geographies of Un-free Labor" at the Annual Conference of Law & Society Association in Boston, participated in a roundtable on Heterodox and Critical Political Economy at the New Directions in Global Thought Conference of the Institute of Global Law & Policy at Harvard University, and was interviewed by the Voice of America International Service about the war in Afghanistan and the aftermath of the general elections in Pakistan.
      • His article “Debt & Discipline” has been republished as a chapter in Race, Empire and the Crisis of the Subprime (Paula Chakravartty and Denise Ferreira de Silva eds., Johns Hopkins University Press: 2013).
      • He also published “Cheaper than a Slave: Indentured Labor, Colonialism, and Capitalism,” in Whittier Law Review, which was based on the keynote address delivered at the Expanding Critical Spaces of International Law Discourse Conference at Whittier Law School.

Natasha Martin, Associate Professor of Law

      • She presented "Virtual Work Masculinities" as an invited participant in Masculinities and the Law: A Multidimensional Approach at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association in Boston, Mass. She also presented "Virtual Workplace Culture" on another panel of labor and employment law scholars at the LSA meeting.
      • She moderated the closing panel of the symposium by the UC Berkeley Law School celebrating the release of "Presumed Incompetent" (Utah State 2012) (co-edited by Professor Carmen González). This panel focused on solutions toward enhancing the inclusion and success of female faculty of color in the academy.

Laurel Oates, Professor of Law

      • She summarized her finding on how students are using the new research platforms at a session sponsored by LexisNexis at the AALS meeting held in Seattle.

Catherine O'Neill, Professor of Law

      • Her article, "Fishable Waters," was published in the American Indian Law Journal.
      • She was invited to give a presentation to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10's Tribal Liaisons Annual Workshop. The workshop was held jointly in Seattle and Anchorage. Her talk was entitled "Fishable Waters: Recent Developments in Protecting Tribal Rights."

J. Christopher Rideout, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Associate Director of the Legal Writing Program

      • He presented a paper titled “'The Whole Truth': Narrative Completeness in Legal Storytelling,” at the Applied Legal Storytelling Conference.
      • He mentored the Writers' Workshop, a scholarly writing workshop that followed the Association of Legal Writing Directors conference in Milwaukee, Wisc. The workshop is sponsored by the Legal Writing Institute.

Anna Roberts, Assistant Professor of Law

      • She presented her paper, "Casual Ostracism: Jury Exclusion on the Basis of Criminal Convictions," at the Annual Meeting of the Law & Society Association and at the AALS Mid-Year Conference on Criminal Justice.

Mimi Samuel, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

      • She taught a three-week Introduction to the U.S. Legal System class as part of the Open Society Foundation's pre-academic summer program in Istanbul, Turkey. The program prepares Open Society scholarship recipients for post-graduate study in the United States. Mimi's class included students from Argentina, Columbia, Egypt, Tunisia, Palestine, Kenya, and Nepal.

Julie Shapiro, Professor

      • Her article, "What changed when the gay adoption ban was lifted?: Perspectives of lesbian and gay parents in Florida," which she co-authored with several social scientists, was published in Sexuality Research and Social Policy.
      • She gave a presentation on ethical questions for lawyers working with cryopreservation of gametes at the national meeting of the American Bar Association Family Law Section at a meeting in Anchorage, Alaska.
      • She also gave a presentation on use of assisted reproductive technology by lesbian and gay families at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Adoption Attorneys in April in San Diego.

David Skover, Fredric C. Tausend Professor of Law

      • His most recent co-authored book, "On Dissent" (Cambridge University Press), was released. It is a phenomenological study of the attributes and functions of the American concept of dissent. He and his co-author Ron Collins presented at the bookstore Politics & Prose in Washington, D.C to kick off the celebration of their latest book. "Book Notes" will record the presentation and broadcast the event at various times in its fall season.

Ronald Slye, Professor of Law

      • He spoke in Washington, D.C. at Freedom House's Insider's Discussion titled "Reconciling with the Truth: Understanding the Report of Kenya's Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission and Prospects for the Future." The discussion included members of civil society from Kenya who were joined by video link, and members of civil society and government in Washington, D.C.

Denis Stearns, Professor from Practice

      • He was moderator and discussant for a panel of paper-presentations on "Framing Food Risk and Safety," at the Joint 2013 Annual Meetings of the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society (AFHVS) and the Association for the Study Of Food and Society (ASFS) at Michigan State University.
      • He authored a chapter, “Food Safety and the Law: Understanding the Real-Life Liability Risks,” for Researching the Hazards in Hazardous Food (Barbara Alamanza, Ph.D. & Richard Ghiselli, Ph.D. eds., Apple Academic Press).

John Strait, Associate Professor of Law

      • He made the following presentations over the summer: "What's On Your Mind," an ethics session for the WSBA 20th Annual Employment Law Section; the ethics of communicating with represented and unrepresented parties and witnesses in class actions to the ABA Section on Labor and Employment Law at the ABA Annual Convention in San Francisco; and Ethical Considerations in Employment Law for the Seminar Group’s 16th Annual Labor & Employment Law Conference.

George Van Cleve, Visiting Professor in Law and History

      • He was appointed Visiting Professor (Hon.) at the School of History at the University of Kent for 2014-2016. As part of his appointment, he will give lectures and seminars each year for the next several years. He also was appointed Senior Research Fellow (Hon.) of the Leverhulme Trust research project in London. He will help research on the impact of 17th century British multinational companies on the culture and governance of the British Empire.

Lisa Young, Adjunct

      • She co-presented "Best Practices in Drafting Presentation Proposals and Making Scholarly Presentation" at the inaugural conference of the Association of Academic Support Educators. She has also joined the AASE Advocacy and Professional Development Committee.

Spring 2013

Bryan Adamson, Associate Professor

      • He has been appointed to the board of the newly created Northwest Consumer Law Center, which focuses exclusively on legal advocacy for low-income citizens.
      • Along with Diana Singleton, he will steward a $300,000 grant to continue efforts in foreclosure prevention in the Puget Sound area.
      • He has also been invited as a plenary speaker at the annual AALS Clinical Legal Education Conference.
      • He completed a chapter covering media issues for criminal practitioners for an upcoming book to be published by the ABA.
      • In collaboration with other civil proceduralists -- including Erwin Chemerinsky, Barbara Atwood and Judith Resnick - he has been invited by plaintiffs' counsel in Perry v. Schwarzenegger to file an amicus brief in advance of Supreme Court argument.

Janet Ainsworth, John D. Eshelman Professor of Law

      • She was named a member of the Scientific Committee, IAFL Biennial meeting, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico.
      • She was also invited to join the Editorial Board of Linguagem e Direito, a Brazilian journal in English and Portuguese.
      • The Czech Science Foundation invited her to review and assess a Czech government research project on language issues presented by lay self-represented litigants.
      • Her book, "Speaking of Law and Language," co-edited by Roger Shuy and Lawrence Solan, and with Ainsworth authoring three chapters, received a contract for publication by Oxford University Press.
      • She presented her paper, "Contestation over Knowledge in Courtroom Discourse: The Expert Witness on the Stand," at the International Association of Forensic Linguistics Regional Conference.
      • Her book chapter, "Silence, Speech, and the Paradox of the Right to Remain Silent in American Police Interrogations," was published in "Language and the Law: Current Legal Issues," edited by Michael Freeman and Fiona Smith (Oxford University Press).

Tom Antkowiak, Associate Professor and Director of the Latin America Program

      • He presented his article, "Rights, Resources and Rhetoric: Indigenous Peoples and the Inter-American Court," at the annual conference of the Junior International Law Scholars Association.
      • He and two students from his International Human Rights Clinic testified before the Washington House Judiciary Committee to support HB 1504, which would abolish the death penalty in Washington.
      • After an international competition, his proposal was selected to be a chapter of a new book, "35 Years of Inter-American Court of Human Rights: Theory and Practice, Present and Future," published by Intersentia (Cambridge/Antwerp), publishing partner of the American Society of International Law.

Lori Bannai, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

      • She co-presented a discussion of a lawyer's ethical duties to avoid bias and stereotyping at the ABA/GP Solo Conference in Seattle.
      • She co-presented on FERPA, the ADA, and student conduct concerns at the Legal Writing Institute Workshop at Northwestern University School of Law.
      • She co-authored an amicus brief in Hedges v. Obama, arguing for careful judicial scrutiny of national security regulations that impinge on fundamental rights.
      • She spoke about the experiences of women of color who teach Legal Writing at a symposium sponsored by the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice.

Steve Bender, Professor of Law

      • He submitted an invited tribute essay for the forthcoming Derrick Bell memorial in the Seattle University Law Review.
      • He co-organized and moderated a workshop at the AALS annual meeting in New Orleans on "Democracy and the Public Trust: Equality, Integrity, and Suppression in the 2012 Election."
      • He submitted an invited symposium piece about the regulation of recreational marijuana to the Albany Government Law Review's issue, "Overdose: The Failure of the U.S. Drug War and Attempts at Legalization."
      • He also submitted an invited book chapter titled "The Latina/o Influence on U.S. Politics," for the book "Beyond Post-Racial America." (21st Century Dynamics of Multiculturalism)
      • He presented on compassionate immigration reform and moderated an immigration panel at the Pursuit of Justice conference at Gonzaga Law School.

Marilyn Berger, Professor Emeritus

      • She was invited to publish a portfolio "Opening Statement and Closing Argument" for trial advocacy for corporate attorneys for Bloomberg Bureau of National Affairs (BNA). This portfolio will be available to Fortune 500 corporate counsel. Berger will be publishing this portfolio with Ronald Clark, Seattle University Distinguished Practitioner in Residence.
      • She was invited to present her documentary, "Out of the Ashes: 911," at the Film and Law Series at the 2013 AALS Annual Meeting. After the film she delivered a presentation about the film, and its significance for law school teaching.
      • Berger, John Mitchell and Ronald Clark were invited to submit their manuscript for "Pretrial Advocacy: Planning Analysis & Strategy, 4th Edition" by Wolters Kluwer Law & Business.

Bob Boruchowitz, Professor from Practice

      • He participated in an Indigent Defense Strategy Convening at the ACLU National headquarters in New York. 
      • He co-authored an amicus brief in the Washington Supreme Court in a challenge to a homicide conviction. With the Washington Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, he urged the Court to adopt a new standard in evaluating ineffective assistance of counsel: when there is convincing proof that counsel failed to adhere to relevant professional standards for the performance of the defense function, a reviewing court will not engage in the presumption of competence nor will it presume any legitimate trial strategy.
      • His article, "50 Years after Gideon v. Wainwright--County Plan Would End Nonprofit Defender Program," appeared in the King County Bar Bulletin.
      • He spoke on two panels at the American Bar Association mid-year meeting in Dallas. The first was a Criminal Justice Section session, "Gideon in the 21st Century." The second was at the Eighth Annual Summit on Indigent Defense, in a discussion titled, "What is unethical about people pleading guilty without lawyers, and what to do about it."
      • He hosted The Defender Initiative's Third Annual Conference on Public Defense, which attracted 135 participants.
      • He wrote or co-wrote two opinion pieces on the 50th anniversary of Gideon v. Wainwright, one in the Everett (Wash.) Herald and the other in the Louisville (Ky.) Courier-Journal.
      • He offered his reflections on developments in indigent defense at the Gideon v. Wainwright re-renactment at the University of Washington Law School. The Washington Supreme Court justices played the roles of the U.S. Supreme Court justices in the re-enactment. He was also a guest speaker on public defense at the University of Washington Law School Access to Justice Seminar.

Deirdre Bowen, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

      • With her co-principal investigator, Kathy Stanchi, she presented empirical research on "How Jurors Respond to the Timing of Disclosure of Negative Information." The presentation took place at the invitation of the Delaware Valley, Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia Feminist Law Teachers Twentieth Annual CLE Conference.
      • Also upon invitation, she presented her work, "Calling their Bluff: Defense Attorneys' Adaptation to Increased Formalization of Plea Bargaining" at the Washington State Defender Association Conference.
      • She presented her chapter, Visibly Invisible, from the book, "Presumed Incompetent," at the University of California Berkeley Law School symposium celebrating the publication of the book.

Lisa Brodoff, Associate Professor and Director of the Ronald A. Peterson Law Clinic

      • She spoke at the 2012 Washington End of Life Consensus Coalition (WEOLCC) Annual Meeting on "New Advance Directive for People With Alzheimer's Disease or Dementia."
      • She has also has written (in collaboration with Robb Miller, Executive Director of Compassion & Choices of Washington) a new advance directive form and instruction booklet for people with Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of dementia.
      • She has two articles accepted for publication: "Increased Risks of Needing Long-Term Care Among Older Adults Living with Same-Sex Partners," for the American Journal of Public Health, co-authored with Prof. Bridget Hiedemann from the Seattle University Business School, and "We Have a Dream: Integrating Skills Courses and Public Interest Work in the First Year of Law School (and Beyond)," for the Chapman Law Review, co-authored with Sara Rankin and Mary Bowman.
      • She Sara Rankin and did a panel presentation at the annual AALS Clinical Law Conference in Puerto Rico about Seattle University's ground-breaking Legal Writing/Clinic collaboration wherein clinicians and their students work on a real clinic client case in the first-year legal writing class. They also showed a recording of 3L students who worked on a clinic memo in their first year, reflecting on what they learned and the significant impact on them of working on a real client case.

Patrick Brown, Visiting Assistant Professor

      • Co-authored the article on "Decisions, Findings and Conclusions" in the third edition of the "Washington Civil Procedure Deskbook."
      • He also co-authored the "Editors' Introduction" to the Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis on ethics.
      • He delivered a paper on "Law in Classicism and Classicism in Law" at a conference at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

Robert Chang, Professor and Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

      • He gave the keynote address at the Inspiring Voices Conference at Stanford Law School.
      • He also delivered a speech entitled "Legacies: Race, Post-Race, and History" at UC Davis School of Law for a program sponsored by their Coalition for Diversity and the Keith Aoki Center.

Margaret Chon, Donald and Lynda Horowitz Professor for the Pursuit of Justice

      • She participated in the Second Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Global Interest, held at FGV-Rio. She gave an overview of IP, innovation and development at a session co-hosted by the Open A.I.R. project and the International Development Research Council.
      • Her paper, "PPS in Global IP," has been accepted as a book chapter for the 2012 ATRIP book on Methods and Perspectives in Intellectual Property.
      • New York University has published the paper from her sabbatical project, "Public-Private Partnerships in Global Intellectual Property." The paper will also be published in abbreviated form as a book chapter in "Intellectual Property: Methods and Perspectives" (Graeme Dinwoodie, ed., forthcoming 2013).
      • Her second edition of "Race, Rights and Reparation: Law and the Japanese American Internment" was published by Aspen Law & Business. Korematsu Center Director Lori Bannai is one of the contributors to this revised book, which examines the lessons of internment to civil liberties and national security post 9/11.

Annette Clark, Professor of Law

      • Her essay, "Postscript to a Deanship," was published in the Deans’ Issue of the Toledo Law Review.
      • She was invited by Dean Avi Soifer of the University of Hawaii to speak in Honolulu on April 19 on the future of legal education.

Ronald Clark, Adjunct Professor

      • On behalf of the Justice Department and Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, he trained judges and prosecutors in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on the prosecution of war crimes.

Brooke Coleman, Assistant Professor

      • Her textbook, "Learning Civil Procedure," has been published by West. Co-written with three other civil procedure professors and a practitioner, her book is the latest installment in the West Learning Series.

Richard Delgado, Professor of Law

      • He gave a talk at the University of Alabama School of Law on the controversy in Tucson over Mexican-American Studies in public schools.
      • He presented a poster at the annual meeting of AALS in New Orleans. Prepared and presented with his brother, Cesar Delgado, professor of education at UT-Austin, the poster illustrated the use of physical analogies in legal and political discourse, including arguments for and against affirmative action. Richard and his brother gave a talk to the socioeconomics section at AALS on the same topic. He and Jean Stefancic gave a second talk to the socioeconomics section on psychological motivations for conservative philanthropy.
      • He also received an award for lifetime service from the national Latino law professors association at their annual dinner in New Orleans.
      • He published a review of Jeremy Waldron's "The Harm in Hate Speech" in the latest issue of Law & Society Review.
      • He and Jean Stefancic gave a faculty workshop at Arizona State University School of Law on book banning in Tucson, under a new state law prohibiting the teaching of Mexican American Studies in public schools.
      • Law & Inequality: A Journal of Theory & Practice (University of Minnesota) selected his scholarship as focal point for a 2014-15 commemorative volume, citing his "outstanding record of accomplishment and significance to Critical Race Theory scholarship (that) has reshaped how legal scholars understand civil rights law, race jurisprudence, and whiteness studies."

Diane Lourdes Dick, Assistant Professor of Law

      • She presented her work in progress, "Deconstructing Corporate Financial Distress," at The George Washington University Law School Center for Law, Economics and Finance Junior Faculty Business and Financial Law Workshop.
      • She was invited to speak on a panel at the 2013 mid-year meeting of the Washington State Bar Association Real Property, Probate and Trust Section. Diane will speak on the status of the Business Law Section's work in drafting an updated report providing guidance to Washington attorneys issuing legal opinions in secured lending transactions.
      • She accepted an offer to publish her article, "The Chapter 11 Efficiency Fallacy," in the Brigham Young University Law Review.
      • She was invited to speak at a CLE hosted by the WSBA's Business Law Section: 100 Things Every Business Lawyer Should Know.

Gillian Dutton, Director of the Externship Program and Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

      • She co-authored an article, "Promoting Language Access in the Legal Academy," with Beth Lyon, Jayesh Rathod and Deborah Weissman for the spring 2013 issue of the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class.
      • She participated on a panel, "Language Access in the Courts," at the National Legal Aid and Defender's Conference in Chicago. While there she also helped convene a meeting of the ABA Advisory Committee to discuss implementation of the "ABA Standards for Language Access in Courts."
      • She provided testimony to the Washington State Policy Commission and Health Care Exchange Board -- which is responsible for implementing the Affordable Care Act in Washington State -- on the requirements to provide language access, in Washington State's Department of Social and Health Services programs and under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
      • She and Dee Knapp are presenting at the 20th Annual Northwest Dispute Resolution Conference at the University of Washington School of Law.
      • She helped organize the Washington State Coalition for Language Access Annual Summit. She provided training on "Cultural Competency and Implicit Bias," hosted a "Language Access Advocacy Roundtable," and presented with Uriel Iniguez from the Washington State Hispanic Affairs Commission on "Immigration Enforcement and Language Access."

John Eason, Professor of Law

      • He was elected to join the American College of Trusts & Estates Council as an Academic Fellow. ACTEC membership is based upon "substantial contributions to the field of trusts and estates law through writing, teaching and bar leadership activities."

Eric Eberhard, Distinguished Indian Law Practitioner in Residence

      • He testified before the U.S. Department of the Interior's Commission on Indian Trust Reform and Administration. Eberhard proposed several amendments to existing federal law, the establishment of a demonstration project intended to provide tribes with new opportunities to directly administer trust funds and assets and changes to the Office of Special Trustee in the Department.
      • He was the lead witness for a workshop held by the Committee on Community Development, Housing and Tribal Affairs of the Washington State House of Representatives to review issues involved in business and economic development on the 29 Indian reservations in the state.
      • He delivered a presentation on the restoration of the Elwha River during the evening lecture at the ABA Public Land Law Symposium at the University of Montana School of Law.

Margaret Fisher, Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

      • She received the 2012-13 Sandra Day O'Connor Award for the Advancement of Civic Education from the National Center for State Courts.
      • She also agreed to help develop the Street Law text for the country of Afghanistan and has been asked to speak at the Law School Colloquium in Afghanistan.
      • She and two Garfield High School youth court members made a presentation on the Seattle Youth Traffic Court at Citizen University.
      • She taught an immigration lesson at the Leadership Conference of the Washington Council for the Social Studies in Chelan.

Charlotte Garden, Assistant Professor of Law

      • Her article, "Union Made: Labor's Litigation for Social Change," will be published by the Tulane Law Review.

Carmen González, Professor of Law

      • Her book, "Presumed Incompetent," was selected as one of CHOICE Magazine's Editors' Picks for March 2013. CHOICE magazine reviews over 600 new scholarly books on a monthly basis and highlights as its Editors' Picks a handful of books that stand out for their "excellence, timeliness, originality, or sheer reading pleasure."
      • "Presumed Incompetent" was also reviewed in the Huffington Post.

Christian Halliburton, Associate Profesor

      • He has been reappointed by Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn to serve a second term, through 2015, as Commissioner on the City of Seattle's Public Safety Civil Service Commission, which oversees the testing, promotion and discipline of uniformed personnel in the City's Fire and Police Departments.

Lily Kahng, Professor

      • Her article (co-authored with Mary Louise Fellows, Minnesota Law School), "Costly Mistakes: Undertaxed Business Owners and Overtaxed Workers," was published in the George Washington Law Review.
      • She accepted an offer from the Alabama Law Review to publish her article, "Path Dependence in Tax Subsidies for Home Sales."

Jack Kirkwood, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Strategic Planning and Mission

      • His article, "Powerful Buyers and Merger Enforcement," was published by the Boston University Law Review.
      • His article, "Protecting Consumers and Small Suppliers from Anticompetitive Conduct," was accepted for publication by the Fordham Law Review.
      • He was invited to join the 2013 Academic Antitrust Writing Awards' Steering Committee by the Concurrences Journal, a journal of global competition law.
      • He was invited to sign, and did sign, two Supreme Court amicus briefs. The first, filed by a group of antitrust professors, urged the Court to grant certiorari in a rate filing case. The second, filed by the American Antitrust Institute and a collection of antitrust and IP professors, asked the Court to reverse the Eleventh Circuit and rule that "reverse payment" patent settlements are presumptively illegal.
      • He was invited to join a small group of scholars from elite institutions in an amicus brief to the Supreme Court. The brief asked the Court to invalidate a ban on class arbitration in American Express' contracts with merchants, a ban that deprived small merchants of any effective means of exercising their private rights of action under the antitrust laws.
      • His article, "The Essence of Antitrust: Protecting Consumers and Small Suppliers from Anticompetitive Conduct," has been published by the Fordham Law Review.
      • He presented "IP and the New Regulatory Regime for Telecommunications" at the Eighteenth Annual Comprehensive Conference on Telecommunications Law sponsored by Law Seminars International.

Connie Krontz, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

      • She presented a six-hour CLE for the King County Office of Public Defense on writing persuasive briefs.
      • She was an assistant editor for Volume 18 of "Legal Writing: The Journal of the Legal Writing Institute."

Tayyab Mahmud, Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Global Justice

      • His article, "Debt & Discipline: Neoliberal Political Economy and the Working Classes," has been published as the lead article in Volume 101 of the Kentucky Law Journal.
      • He was appointed to the AALS Standing Committee on the Recruitment and Retention of Minority Law Teachers for a three-year term.

John McKay, Professor from Practice

      • He addressed the Emerald City and Renton Rotary Clubs on "Pot, Politics and Prosecutors" and the possible federal preemption lawsuit against the new marijuana laws in Washington State and Colorado.
      • He will serve as a senior consultant and Chief of Team for the U.S. State Department rule of law programs in the West Bank effective June 1. Working with a Palestinian staff he will help to provide support and training to the courts, prosecution and police as Palestinians prepare for statehood and an end to occupation. He will be on leave from the Law School and will return to teaching following his 18- to 24-month assignment.

Laurel Oates, Professor of Law

      • She co-chaired 16 one-day workshops sponsored by the Legal Writing Institute and held at law schools across the country, attracting more than 600 participants.
      • Along with Anne Enquist and Connie Krontz she published the third edition of "Just Briefs," which walks students through the process of writing motion briefs and appellate briefs, and which provides students with an introduction to oral advocacy.

Catherine O'Neill, Professor of Law

      • She was named an "Environmental Law Scholar of the Week" by the University of North Carolina School of Law's Center for Law, Environment, Adaptation, and Resources.

Russell Powell, Associate Professor of Law

      • He presented a paper titled "Islamic Law in Turkey after the Arab Spring" for the Islamic Law Section of the AALS at the Annual Meeting in New Orleans this January.

Sara Rankin, Assistant Professor of Lawyering Skills

      • She was invited to speak on the opening plenary panel at the 2013 Chapman Law Review Symposium, "The Future of Law, Business and Legal Education," at Chapman University School of Law. Her remarks are published in the spring volume of the Chapman Law Review.
      • Her article, "The Fully Formed Lawyer: Why Law Schools Should Require Public Service to Better Prepare Students for Private Practice," was solicited for publication in the Chapman Law Review. The article argues that the key to private practice skills is to emphasize actual public interest legal service during law school, starting in the first year.

Becca Rausch, Visiting Assistant Professor

      • She presented her work in progress, "A Feminist Approach to a Post-Obamacare America," at the Northeast Regional Junior Faculty Development Workshop, hosted at Albany Law School.

J. Christopher Rideout, Professor of Lawyering Skills and Associate Director of the Legal Writing Program

      • He presented his paper, "Is There a Doctrine of Legal Writing?" at the Southeastern Regional Legal Writing Institute Conference in Savannah, Georgia. The paper will be published as a symposium law review piece.

Anna Roberts, Professor

      • She has been selected to present a work in progress, "Casual Ostracism: Jury Exclusion on the Basis of Criminal Convictions," at the 2013 AALS Mid-Year Conference on Criminal Justice.
      • She gave a presentation on "Race and the Criminal Jury" to the National Conference of the National Defender Investigator Association in Seattle.

Jim Rosenfeld, Director of Education Law Programs and Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

      • Through the Academy for IDEA Administrative Law Judges and Impartial Hearing Officers, he organized and presented a seventh multi-day training in special education law and procedure for the California Office of Administrative Hearings in Folsom, Calif.
      • He organized and presented at a two-day training for the Missouri Administrative Hearings Commission in Jefferson City, Mo.

Mimi Samuel, Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills

      • She gave a presentation about teaching skills online at the Eighth Global Legal Skills Conference in San Jose, Costa Rica.
      • She was selected by the Open Society Foundation to teach an Introduction to the American Legal System course as part of its Pre-Academic Summer Program in Istanbul, Turkey.

Ada Shen-Jaffe, Professor from Practice

      • She was invited to make a presentation in Washington, D.C., before the national staff of Equal Justice Works on the law school's demonstrated commitment to educating lawyers to serve as leaders for a just and humane world through social justice values-based academics to action, servant leadership and experience-based practice skills training.

Bill Sherman, Visiting Assistant Professor

      • He was named to Attorney General Bob Ferguson's Transition Team.
      • His book chapter, "Blackout in the Name of Sunshine: When Government Law Stifles Civic Social Media," will be published in "Politics and Policy in the Information Age" (Springer Science+Business Media, 2013)
      • His book review essay, "A Pragmatic Republic, If You Can Keep It," reviewing Jerry L. Mashaw's work, "Creating the Administrative Constitution: The Lost One Hundred Years of American Administrative Law," was accepted by the Michigan Law Review.
      • In his capacity as Chair of the Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission, he testified before the Seattle City Council in support of the Commission’s proposal to institute a system to publicly finance campaigns for City Council in an effort to reduce barriers to entry for candidates and engage a broader spectrum of the public in campaigns. The Commission also transmitted to the City Council a proposal for a major new whistleblower protection ordinance for the City.

Andrew Siegel, Associate Professor of Law, and Julie Shapiro, Professor of Law

      • They are presenting a program titled, "Making Sense of the LGBTQ Cases Before the US Supreme Court" at a special Pride Foundation reception at Perkins Coie, in which they review the oral arguments and discuss possible outcomes of the two cases.

David Skover, Fredric C. Tausend Professor of Law

      • His newest co-authored book, "Mania: The Story of the Outraged and Outrageous Lives that Launched a Cultural Revolution," about the Beat writers, was released, including a book tour of six major cities, radio and television appearances and a symposium at Seattle University.
      • He assisted in the editing of, and signed the amicus brief of California Assembly Speaker Perez and Law Professors Concerned with Representative Democracy, submitted in support of the respondents in Hollingsworth v. Perry, the U.S. Supreme Court case involving the challenge to California's prohibition on same-sex marriage.

Denis Stearns, Professor from Practice

      • He accepted an invitation to author a chapter in an upcoming graduate-level textbook to be published by CRC Press. This chapter will examine the product liability issues and risks related to the retail manufacture and sale of food.
      • He presented at an international global food law conference about "Ethical Challenges of Settling Claims Arising from Large Foodborne Illness Outbreaks: Three Case Studies."
      • He signed a contract to author two entries in "Food Issues: An Encyclopedia," a multivolume inter-disciplinary reference work being edited by Ken Albala, Ph.D, and to be published in 2014 by Sage Publications.

Jean Stefancic, Research Professor

      • She received the annual Derrick Bell award for distinguished scholarship from the Conference on Critical Race Studies in Education for 2013.
      • She and Richard Delgado wrote a chapter that appeared in "Handbook of Critical Race Theory in Education," edited by Marvin Lynn and Adrienne D. Dixson.

Jane Stoever, Assistant Professor

      • Her invited essay, "Abuse Survivors' Experiences with Child Support," was published in Child Support Report, a publication of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Child Support Enforcement.

George Van Cleve, Visiting Professor in Law and History

      • His article, "Bankruptcy and the Future of Insurance Risk-Sharing," has been accepted for publication in the American Bankruptcy Institute Law Review.
      • His essay, "Jefferson the President: Reclaiming the Republic in Europe's Long Shadow," will be published in Reviews in American History.

Erica Wolf and Douglas Nash, Adjunct Professors

      • They presented at the University of Arizona's Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy Program and the San Xavier Allottees Association in Tucson, Arizona for attorneys, federal employees, law students, and landowners. Topics included Indian Land History, Federal Probate, and Land Consolidation.

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