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Boundaries and Allegiances: Problems of Justice and Responsibility in Liberal Thought. Samuel Scheffler. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001. JC 574.S34 2001

From the Publisher: This collection of eleven essays by one of the most fascinating moral philosophers currently writing explores a perspective that is at once sympathetic towards and critical of liberal political philosophy. The essays address the capacity of liberal thought, and of the moral traditions on which it draws, to accommodate a variety of challenges posed by the changing circumstances of the modern world. They also consider how, in an era of rapid globalization, when social arrangements and institutions of ever-increasing size, complexity, and scope structure our lives, we can best conceive of the responsibilities of individual agents and the normative significance of our diverse commitments and allegiances. Linked by common themes, the volume examines the responsibilities we have in virtue of belonging to a community, the compatibility of such obligations with equality, the demands of distributive justice in general, and liberalism's relationship to liberty, community, and equality.

About the author: Samuel Scheffler is a professor of philosophy and law at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law.

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Media and Sovereignty: The Global Information Revolution and Its Challenge to State Power. Monroe E. Price. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2002. K 4240.P75 2002

From the Publisher: Media and Sovereignty focuses on emerging foreign policies that govern media in a world where war has information as well as military fronts. The author asks how the state, in the face of institutional and technological change, controls the forms of information reaching its citizens. The author also provides a framework for analyzing the techniques used by states to influence populations in other states by drawing on examples of regulation of media for political ends, including "self regulation," media regulation in conflict zones, the control of harmful and illegal content, and the use of foreign aid to alter media in target societies.

About the author: Professor Price is co-director of Oxford University's Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy and Joseph and Sadie Danciger Professor of Law and Director of the Howard M. Squadron Program in Law, Media, and Society at the Benjamin N, Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University.

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Code: and Other Laws of Cyberspace. Lawrence Lessig. New York: Basic Books, 1999. ZA 3225.L47 1999

From the Publisher: There's a common belief that cyberspace cannot be regulated that it is, in its very essence, immune from the government's (or anyone else's) control. Code argues that this belief is wrong. It is not in the nature of cyberspace to be unregulable; cyberspace has no "nature." It only has code the software and hardware that make cyberspace what it is. That code can create a place of freedom as the original architecture of the Net did or it can be a place of exquisitely oppressive control. If we miss this point, then we will miss how cyberspace is changing. Under the influence of commerce, cyberspace is becoming a highly regulable space, where our behavior is much more tightly controlled than in real space. But that's not inevitable either. We can, and should, choose what kind of cyberspace we want and what freedoms we will guarantee. These choices are all about architecture: about what kind of code will govern cyberspace, and who will control it. In this realm, code is the most significant form of law, and it is up to lawyers, policymakers, and especially citizens to decide what values that code embodies.

About the author: Lawrence Lessig is a professor at Stanford Law School and founder of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society

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Nonlegal Careers for Lawyers, 4th edition. Gary A. Munneke, William D. Henslee. Chicago, IL: ABA, Law Practice Management Section, 2003. KF 297.M862 2003.

From the Publisher: Great opportunities exist for law students and practicing lawyers outside the traditional practice of law. This user-friendly guidebook explains when and how to choose a nonlegal career; the specialized skills legal training provides; and how to plan and conduct a job search. Readers will find information on careers in business and industry, government and public service, associations and institutions, and entrepreneurial ventures. A resource section provides surveys and listings of nonlegal careers in several categories, and a listing of publishers and suggesting readings on nonlegal careers.

About the authors: Gary A. Munneke and William D. Henslee have produced numerous books, seminars and articles on career development, and they are two leading law career authorities.
Gary A. Munneke is a Professor of Law at Pace University School of Law. William D. Henslee is an Associate Professor of Law at Florida A&M University College of Law.

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Compiled by Bob Menanteaux and Nancy Minton; Technical Direction: Greg Soejima; Montage: Page Scott.

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