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Sex and Social Justice.
Martha C. Nussbaum. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. HQ1150.N87 2000

From the Publisher:

Growing out of Nussbaum's years of work with an international development agency connected with the United Nations, this collection charts a feminism that is deeply concerned with the urgent needs of women who live in hunger and illiteracy, or under unequal legal systems. Offering an internationalism informed by development economics and empirical detail, many essays take their start from the experiences of women in developing countries. Nussbaum argues for a universal account of human capacity and need, while emphasizing the essential role of knowledge of local circumstance. Further chapters take on the pursuit of social justice in the sexual sphere, exploring the issue of equal rights for lesbians and gay men.

About the Author:

Martha Nussbaum is a professor of law and ethics at the University of Chicago Law School.

More about the Author:

http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/nussbaum/

 

 

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The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice
Sandra Day O’Connor; edited by Craig Joyce. New York: Random House, 2003. KF8742.O274 2003

From the Publisher:

In The Majesty of the Law, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor explores the law, her life as a Justice, and how the Court has evolved and continues to function, grow, and change as an American institution. Tracing some of the origins of American law through history, people, and ideas, O'Connor sheds new light on the basics, and through personal observation she explores the development of institutions and ideas we have come to regard as fundamental.

O'Connor discusses notable cases that have shaped American democracy and the Court as we know it today, and she traces the turbulent battle women have fought for a place in our nation's legal system since America's inception. Straight-talking, clear-eyed, inspiring, The Majesty of the Law is more than a reflection on O'Connor's own experiences as the first female Justice of the Supreme Court; it also contains a discussion of how the suffrage movement changed the lives of women-in voting booths, jury boxes, and homes across the country.


About the Author:

Sandra Day O'Connor was born in El Paso, Texas, and raised on the Lazy B, a ranch on the Arizona-New Mexico border. Nominated by President Reagan as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, she took the oath of office on September 25, 1981, the first woman to do so.

Craig Joyce, editor, is Law Foundation Professor at the University of Houston Law Center, where he currently serves as co-director of the Institute for Intellectual Property and Information Law.

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Refusing Care: Forced Treatment and the Rights of the Mentally Ill.
Elyn R. Saks. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002. RC343.S245 2002

From the Publisher:

"It has been said that how a society treats its least fortunate members speaks volumes about its humanity. If so, our treatment of the mentally ill may suggest that American society is in many senses inhumane: swinging between overintervention and utter neglect, we sometimes force extreme treatments on those who do not want them, and at other times discharge mentally ill patients who do want treatment without providing adequate resources for their care in the community." Refusing Care focuses on the former problem - that of overintervention - asking when, if ever, the mentally ill should be treated against their will. Basing her analysis on both compelling case histories and empirical studies, Elyn R. Saks brings together her experience in law and in psychiatry to explore the dilemmas raised by forced treatment in three contexts: civil commitment, or forced hospitalization for noncriminals; medication; and seclusion and restraints. Saks argues that the best way to solve each of these dilemmas is, paradoxically, to be both more protective of individual autonomy and more paternalistic than current law calls for.

About the Author:

Elyn R. Saks is an Orrin B. Evans Professor of Law, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the USC School of Law and USC School of Medicine’s Institute of Psychiatry and the Law.

More about the author:

http://lawweb.usc.edu/admissions/curriculum/pages/faculty/esaks.html

 

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Wrongly Convicted: Perspectives on Failed Justice.
Saundra D. Westervelt. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2001. KF220.W76 2001

From the Publisher:

The evidence that people are wrongly convicted in the American criminal justice system has been growing and is arguably a systemic problem. Westervelt and Humphrey (both in sociology, U. of North Carolina) present 14 essays that explore the causes and social characteristics of wrongful convictions, while also offering case studies and discussions of solutions to the problem. Among the topics explored are the role of informants, the reasons behind false confessions, police misconduct, racial bias , the effectiveness of counsel, and the death penalty.
Annotation © Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

About the Author:

Saundra D. Westervelt is a professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro.

 

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Compiled by Bob Menanteaux and Nancy Minton; Technical Direction: Greg Soejima; Montage: Stephen Leptich