Law Library Newsletter

New & Notable

April 2008


Do They Hear You When You Cry


Orientalism


Understanding Assisted Suicide: Nine Issues to Consider


Buying Social Justice: Equality, Government Procurement, and Legal Change



The New Corporate Accountability: Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law

 


New Acquisitions


Previous Issues


 

 

 

 

Do They Hear You When You Cry

By Fauziya A. Kassindja and Layli Miller Bashir
New York: Delta Books, 1999
JV6601.K37 1999


From the Publisher
In 1994, Fauziya Kassindja, an extraordinary teenager from a wealthy, prominent family in Kpalime, Africa, fled from her home to escape tribal ritual female genital mutilation. She sought political asylum in the United States, but was instead incarcerated for 16 months in various Immigration and Naturalization Service detention facilities. Housed in maximum security, Kassindja was denied legal representation, medical care, and religious freedom. The story of her persecution and detention reveals the harsh side of U.S. immigration policy and provides powerful testimony in favor of reform. Her book records a recent but historic civil and human rights battle with repercussions that continue to be felt throughout the nation.


About the Author
Fauziya Kassindja was born in 1977 in Kpalimé, Togo, Africa, and now resides in Alexandria, Virginia.

Layli Miller Bashir, a graduate of American University Washington College of Law, is now an attorney practicing in Washington, D.C. She is also the founder of the Tahirih Justice Center, which assists women facing international human rights abuses. She lives in Virginia with her husband.


Additional Information Online


Orientalism

By Edward W. Said
New York: Vintage Books, c1994. 25th Anniversary Edition.
DS12.S24 2003


From the Publisher
Twenty-five years after its first publication, Edward Said’s groundbreaking critique of the West’s historical, cultural, and political perceptions of the East has become a modern classic. In this wide-ranging, intellectually vigorous study, Said traces the origins of “orientalism” to the centuries-long period during which Europe dominated the Middle and Near East and, from its position of power, defined “the orient” simply as “other than” the occident. This entrenched view continues to dominate western ideas and, because it does not allow the East to represent itself, prevents true understanding. Essential and still eye-opening, Orientalism remains one of the most important books written about our divided world.


About the Author
Edward W. Said was born in Jerusalem, raised in Jerusalem and Cairo, and educated in the United States, where he attended Princeton (B.A. 1957) and Harvard (M.A. 1960; Ph.D. 1964). In 1963, he began teaching at Columbia University, where he was University Professor of English and Comparative Literature.

He is the author of twenty-two books which have been translated into 35 languages, including Beginnings: Intention and Method (1975); Orientalism (1978); The Question of Palestine (1979); Covering Islam (1980); The World, the Text, and the Critic (1983); After the Last Sky (1986); Musical Elaborations (1991); Culture and Imperialism (1993); Representations of the Intellectual: The Reith Lectures (1994); Peace and Its Discontents: Essays on Palestine and the Middle East Peace Process (1996); Entre Guerre et Paix (1997); and Out of Place: A Memoir (1999). Besides his academic work, he wrote a twice-monthly column for Al-Hayat and Al-Ahram; was a regular contributor to newspapers in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East; and was the music critic for The Nation.


Additional Information Online


Understanding Assisted Suicide: Nine Issues to Consider

By John B. Mitchell
Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008
R726.M565 2007


From the Publisher
The question of assisted suicide retains a powerful grip on our minds and our imaginations as one of the most emotionally charged and controversial topics of our time. It is the border beyond which most of us fear to tread. Even so, the issue isn't going away soon: as the baby boomer generation ages, many of us will watch ourselves and our parents grow older, and wonder at the decisions that lie ahead.

Understanding Assisted Suicide provides both a fresh take on this important topic and the context for intelligent participation in the discussion. Uniquely, John Mitchell frames the issue using his own experience of watching both his parents die, which led him to ask fundamental questions about death, dying, religion, and the role of medicine and technology in alleviating human suffering.

Understanding Assisted Suicide offers a clear, navigable landscape over which those who seek their own answers can travel. The "nine-issue structure" allows both careful exploration of separate issues and a view of the full spectrum of ideas involved.


About the Author
John B. Mitchell is Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law. He is the coauthor of Pretrial Advocacy: Planning, Analysis, and Strategy and Trial Advocacy: Planning, Analysis, and Strategy.


Additional Information Online


Buying Social Justice: Equality, Government Procurement, and Legal Change

By Christopher McCrudden Oxford, New York : Oxford University Press, 2008
K884.M33 2007


From the Publisher

Governments spend huge amounts of money buying goods and services from the private sector. How far should their spending power be affected by social policy? Arguments against the practice are often made by economists - on the grounds of inefficiency - and lawyers - on the grounds of free competition and international economic law. Buying Social Justice analyzes how governments in developed and developing countries use their contracting power in order to advance social equality and reduce discrimination, and argues that this approach is an entirely legitimate and efficient means of achieving social justice. The book looks at the different experiences of a range of countries, including the USA, the UK, and South Africa. The role of EC and WTO law in mediating the tensions between the economic function of procurement and the social uses of procurement is discussed, and the outcomes of controversies concerning the legitimacy of the integration of social values into procurement are analyzed.


About the Authors
Christopher McCrudden received his legal education in Belfast (LL.B.), Yale University (LL.M.), and Oxford (D.Phil.). He has been a fellow of Lincoln College since 1980. He is currently also a Professor in Human Rights Law in the University and a (non-practicing) barrister (Gray's Inn ).


Additional Information Online


The New Corporate Accountability: Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law

Edited by Doreen McBarnet, Aurora Voiculescu, Tom Campbell Cambridge [ Eng. ], New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007 HD60.N49 2007


From the Publisher

The adoption by companies of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) policies is routinely characterized as voluntary. But if CSR is self-governance by business, it is self-governance that has received a firm push from external social and market forces, from forces of social accountability. Law is also playing a more significant role than the image of CSR suggests, and this legal accountability - the focus of the book - is set to increase. Legal intervention should not, however, be seen as making social accountability redundant. Wider ethical standards and social and market forces are also necessary to make legal regulation effective. Law is being brought into play in innovative and indirect ways. The initiative lies as much with private organizations as with the state. At the same time governments are using social and market forces to foster CSR. In the context of corporate social responsibility, a new, multi-faceted, corporate accountability is emerging.

The New Corporate Accountability is unique in making the relationship between law and CSR its chief focus. The book will serve to improve the quality of dialogue between business, politicians, civil society and academics on CSR by getting away from simplistic arguments for and against making CSR a voluntary matter.


About the Editors
Doreen McBarnet is Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford University. Her main research interests are in the area of business finance and the law, corporate regulation and corporate responsibility, and the role of law and lawyers, and she is currently engaged on ESRC funded research on 'Regulation, responsibility and the rule of the law'. She is a graduate of Glasgow University, where she studied for her MA and Ph.D, and is a fellow of Wolfson College

Dr. Aurora Voiculescu has received her PhD in Law in June 1999 from London School of Economics and was a British Academy Post-doctoral Fellow in Law at Lincoln College, Oxford University, from 1999 until April 2003 when she joined the OU Law Programme. She is an associate Research Fellow at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford University since 2000.

Professor Tom Campbell, is the Professorial Fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at Charles Sturt University (CSU), Bathurst, New South Wales


Additional Information Online


Newsletter written by law library staff.
New & Notable compiled by Bob Menanteaux and Nancy Minton;
Technical Direction by Greg Soejima


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