Courting the Yankees: Legal Essays on the Bronx Bombers

Amicus Humoriae: An Anthology of Legal Humor

Tort Law and Culture

Saying What the Law Is: The Constitution in the Supreme Court

Courting the Yankees: Legal Essays on the Bronx Bombers. Ettie Ward, editor. Durham, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press, 2003. KF3989.A75C68 2003




From the Publisher:

In a series of twenty-one original articles by legal scholars, editor Ettie Ward and the contributors examine both baseball law and baseball lore. By focusing on the famous New York Yankees, and incidents involving the team and the Yankee franchise, the book explores a wide range of legal issues as they relate to baseball. The chapters are organized so that the sports fan (even if neither a lawyer nor a Yankees’ fan) is invited to read about sports and learn about the law. Baseball aficionados will enjoy the added insights provided by the discussion of various legal concepts, and lawyer sports fans will gain greater insight as to the application of familiar legal principles on and off the baseball diamond. The chapters cover some topics that would ordinarily be covered in a sports law course, as well as others that would not.

About the Author:

Ettie Ward is professor of law at St. Johns University School of Law.

Additional information online:
http://www.cap-press.com/books/1266


Amicus Humoriae: An Anthology of Legal Humor. Robert M. Jarvis, et al., compiler. Durham, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press, 2003. PN6231.L4A64 2003

 

From the Publisher:

In this new work, editors Jarvis, Baker, and McClurg have selected 25 of the funniest law review articles from the past 50 years and arranged them in five categories: law students, law professors, lawyers, judges, and legal scholarship. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography, which is an invaluable research tool. The book's jacket features an original cartoon by the noted artist Alan Gerson.

About the Author:

Robert M. Jarvis is a law professor at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale. Thomas E. Baker and Andrew J. McClurg are law professors at Florida International University in Miami.

Additional information online:
http://www.cap-press.com/books/1240


Tort Law and Culture. Marshall S. Shapo. Durham, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press, 2003. KF1249.S46 2003

 

 

From the Publisher:

This book analyzes personal injury law as a reflection of American society, investigating the cultural meaning of the legal rules that emerge from the crucible of litigation on personal injuries. Because law seeks to use reason to resolve disputes, employing a complex process that includes many procedural constraints, the residue of the legal process in these emotional controversies presents powerful evidence of who we are as a people. Utilizing interesting examples from such cases as Paula Jones’ suit against Bill Clinton, and Ralph Nader’s action against General Motors, as well as more mundane cases involving ordinary people, this book demonstrates why tort wars reflect both wider culture wars and the wars within ourselves. It also notes how some areas of the law indicate our ambivalences about what are “rights” and what are “wrongs” — how we are of two minds about what the law should be, because we are of two minds about what we ought to be. Anyone who has ever been provoked by reports involving personal injuries and wondered why they came out the way they did, will want to read Tort Law and Culture. Professor Shapo’s sensitive, sensible, and scrupulous analysis offers insights into how the law tells us who we are.

About the Author:

Marshall S. Shapo is the Frederic P. Vose Professor at Northwestern University School of Law. He has written or edited twenty books on various aspects of tort law, products liability and related areas of law and social policy.

Additional information online:
http://www.cap-press.com/books/1269


Saying What the Law Is: The Constitution in the Supreme Court. Charles Fried. Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2004. KF4550.F728 2004

 


From the Publisher and the Authors:

[E]very tort case begins with a particular misadventure of its own, and runs the course of a system in which distinct contributions are made by a variety of participants along the way to final resolution. To view these elements in fine detail is to understand the dynamic character of tort law…

This publication provides a student with an understanding of ten leading torts cases, focusing on how the litigation was shaped by lawyers, judges and socioeconomic factors, and why the cases have attained landmark status.

About the Authors:

Rovert L. Rabin is A. Calder Mackay Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Stephen D. Sugarman is Agnes Roddy Robb Professor or Law at the University of California at Berkeley School of Law.



Compiled by Bob Menanteaux and Nancy Minton;
Technical Direction: Greg Soejima