The Second Bill of Rights: FDR's Unfinished Revolution and Why We Need it More Than Everl

The Recurrent Crisis in Corporate Governance

Same Sex Marriage and the Constitution Law

Promises to Keep: Technology, Law, and the Future of Entertainment


 

The Second Bill of Rights: FDR’s Unfinished Revolution and Why We Need It More Than Ever
Cass R. Sunstein

New York, New York: Basic Books 2004. KF3300.S863 2004


From the Publisher:
Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s State of the Union Address of 1944 was arguably the most important political speech of the 20th century. By giving form and specificity, for the first time, to the idea that human beings have inherent economic rights, it embodied a new ideal and aspiration for modern government. . . In The Second Bill of Rights, Sunstein brings back from obscurity [this speech] and shows that many of the landmark legislative achievements of the past 70 years stem from Roosevelt’s proposal for a second Bill of Rights.

About the Author:
Cass R. Sunstein is the Karl N. Llewellyn Distinguished Service Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of Chicago Law School, contributing editor at The New Republic and The American Prospect and “the most-cited law professor on any faculty in the United States” (according to the book jacket).

Additional information online:
http://www.perseusbooksgroup.com/perseus
/book_detail.jsp?isbn=0465083323



The Recurrent Crisis in Corporate Governance
Paul W. MacAvoy and Ira M. Millstein

New York, New York: Macmillan, 2003. HD2741.M196 2003


From the Publisher:
In the late 1990s the American corporation forged ahead in gains in efficiency and earnings performance with strong reflections in stock price appreciation. However, the events of Enron and the bursting of the bubble of unlimited increases in the price of Internet, telecom and energy company shares have caused the authors of this book to take another look at American corporate governance. The authors use a scholar-practitioner approach to show what is missing in today's corporate governance and to support a case for activating the board of directors, with leadership from an independent chair, to put new controls on management and take responsibility for the result.

About the Authors:
Paul MacAvoy is the William Brothers Professor Emeritus of Management Studies and Economics at the Yale School of Management. Ira M. Millstein is the Eugene F. Williams Jr. Visiting Professor in Competitive Enterprise and Strategy at the Yale School of Management.

Additional information online:
http://www.palgrave-usa.com/Search/QuickSearchResults.aspx
?searchby=t&searchfor=recurrent%20crisis


Same Sex Marriage and the Constitution
Evan Gerstmann

New York, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. KF539.G47 2004


From the Publisher:
Does the Constitution protect the right to same-sex marriage? Much of the writing on this subject has been highly one-sided. This book takes a careful second look at the issue. Not only does it carefully look at the legal debate, but it also asks whether, in a democratic society, the courts should settle this question rather than the voters and it takes on the issue of whether such a court-created law could be effective in the face of public opposition. The book argues that this issue is one of the most significant constitutional issues facing society because it challenges society’s commitment to the promise of true legal equality.


About the Author:
Evan Gerstmann is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Loyola Marymount University.

Additional information online:
http://uk.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp
?isbn=0521009529


Promises to Keep: Technology, Law, and the Future of Entertainment
William W. Fisher III

Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2004. KF3035.F57 2004.

From the Publisher:
During the past fifteen years, changes in the technologies used to make and store audio and video recordings, combined with the communication revolution associated with the Internet, have generated an extraordinary array of new ways in which music and movies can be produced and distributed. Both the creators and the consumers of entertainment products stand to benefit enormously from the new systems. Sadly, we have failed thus far to avail ourselves of these opportunities. Instead, much energy has been devoted to interpreting or changing legal rules in hopes of defending older business models against the threats posed by the new technologies. These efforts to plug the multiplying holes in the legal dikes are failing and the entertainment industry has fallen into crisis. This provocative book chronicles how we got into this mess and presents three alternative proposals—each involving a combination of legal reforms and new business models—for how we could get out of it.

About the Author:
William W. Fisher III is the Hale and Dorr Professor of Intellectual Property Law and Director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School.

Additional information online:
http://www.sup.org/cgi-bin/search/book_desc.cgi
?book_id=5013

 


Compiled by Bob Menanteaux and Nancy Minton;
Technical Direction: Greg Soejima