Lawyering in a Diverse World Archives

Past Workshops/Events At a Glance

2011-2012
2010-2011

2009-2010
2008-2009 

2011-2012 Trainings and Workshops

2012 Spring Schedule

January 2012

Cross-Cultural Lawyering

Professor Joe Knight and Associate Dean Shawn Lipton will facilitate a training on Cross-Cultural Lawyering, allowing students to gain practical skills around lawyering in our increasingly diverse world.

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February 2012

Symposium on Racial Bias and the Criminal Justice System

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 February 2012

Diversity Week Reception with Keynote Speaker Judge Arthur Burnett, Sr.

The law school and members of the legal community are invited to participatre in our annual Diversity Week reception. This is an opportunity to learn about and celebrate diversity and hear from our keynote speaker,  Judge Arthur Burnett, Sr., who is a senior judge for the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and the National Executive Director of the National African American Drug Policy Coalition, Inc. He was the first African-American to be appointed as a United States Magistrate (now called United States Magistrate Judges), which occurred on June 26, 1969. RSVP online.

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March 2012

Table Talk, "The Socio-Economic Class Shift through Education"

Participate in the Diversity Table Talk, "The Socio-Economic Class Shift through Education." Students of working and owning class backgrounds will engage in a facilitated dialogue about the impact of shifts in class through higher education over dinner.

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 2011 Fall Schedule

September 2011

25th Anniversary of the Academic Resource Center: CLE and Reception

Seattle University School of Law will celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Academic Resource Center, a life-changing program that exemplifies the law school's commitment to educating leaders for justice and its goal of increasing access to and diversity in the legal profession. One of the greatest challenges still facing the legal profession is the lack of access and retention of members from historically underrepresented communities.  In this interactive CLE seminar, presenters will review the current landscape of and efforts by the law schools and the profession to meet this challenge and facilitate a "Think Tank" conversation to generate recommendations to address this challenge.  Register now

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September 2011

Representing Limited English Prficient Clients and How to Work With an Interpreter, Annex - Room 142

The SU Law Clinic, CPD, and ATJI present this training opportunity for all law students to learn the critically important skills required to adequately represent limited English proficient (LEP) clients. In this training, you will learn about the legal obligations and remedies concerning meaningful access for LEP persons to services and programs. You will also learn critical hands-on skills which will allow you to most effectively work with interpreters in the course of representing LEP clients.  

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  September 2011

QLaw Foundation's Panel Presentation on LGBT Parents and the Law

The law school community and the public are invited to come to this event to hear from a panel of experts who will share information and answer questions about the legal rights of same-sex parents in Washington, including recent changes to Washington's Uniform Parentage Act. 

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  October 2011-February 2012 

Racial Justice Leadership Institute (RJLI) 

RJLI is a professional development opportunity that is being offered to SU law students in-line with our commitment to the University mission.  RJLI is designed to foster leadership skills for working in all areas of the profession in ways that resist systems of privilege and oppression.  Participants can expect to gain:

  • Common tools and language for addressing discomfort, tension, confusion, and other dynamics that emerge in classrooms and workplaces
  • Strategies for identifying, naming, and responding to difficult situations related to identity, privilege, and oppression
  • Deeper connections with peers, including a sense of solidarity and trust with other RJLI participants
  • Shared analysis about the structural and interpersonal operations of racial privilege and oppression
  • Skills for cultivating personal wellness as a strategy for personal and professional sustainability

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October 2011

How to Hang a Shingle - Solo and Low Bono Practice: Seminar and Networking Reception

Does solo practice appeal to you? Have you thought about serving the growing moderate means income community who can't afford going legal rates but make too much money to qualify for legal aid?  If you're curious to learn what it takes to launch such a practice, you should join us for "How to Hang a Shingle" workshop, a program developed by the Center for Professional Development and the Access to Justice Institute.  This full day program will include information on the WSBA's Law Office Management Assistance Program, malpractice insurance, and effective client communication with a particular focus on running a low bono practice aimed at serving moderate means income clients.  Recognizing that many people of moderate means are ethnically and socio-economically diverse, this workshop is an essential part of the Lawyering in a Diverse World series.  

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TBD

 

Table Talk

Table Talk is an informal, facilitated conversation among students over a meal.   The small group conversations are on issues of diversity are facilitated by trained individuals provided by Seattle University's Office of Multicultural Affairs.   More details on the diversity topic will follow.  Tables Talks are organized by the SBA Diversity Representative.

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2010-2011 Trainings and Workshops

  • October - The Edge that Cuts: Intersections of Transphobia, Racism, Economic Injustice, and the Law
  • October - Diversity Table Talk
  • November - Disability Rights: Ethics and Practical Skills
  • January - Racial Justice Leadership Institute Skills Training
  • March - Civil and Criminal Advocacy Strategies for Protecting Civil Rights CLE
  • April - Diversity Table Talk
  • October 2010

    The Edge that Cuts: Intersections of Transphobia, Racism, Economic Injustice, and the Law

    Sponsored by the Seattle University Law Review and Seattle Journal for Social Justice with support from Lawyering in a Diverse World Program at Seattle University School of Law. View the schedule of events.

    ^2010-2011 list of events

    Diversity Table Talk

    The small group conversations are facilitated by trained individuals provided by Seattle University's Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    Table Talk is an informal, facilitated conversation over a meal. Participants discuss whether a personal philosophy of lawyering is needed and how such a philosophy can fill the gap between a lawyer's duty to a client and a lawyer's personal value of taking on the larger issue affecting that client. This is important as students prepare to take on their roles as legal interns/future lawyers. These conversations and personal reflections better prepare students to serve diverse communities.

    ^2010-2011 list of events 

    November 2010

    Disability Rights: Ethics and Practical Skills

    Join us for an engaging program about how to advocate on behalf of people with disabilities, including how to effectively interview people with disabilities and how to ensure compliance with the RPCs when representing clients with disabilities. In addition, participants will learn how to issue-spot special education issues in housing, family & public benefits cases.

    The Evening with the Equal Justice Community event is an opportunity for students and legal aid attorneys to meet informally in groups related to their practice area(s) of interest. It is co-sponsored by the School of Law's Public Interest Law Foundation and Access to Justice Institute.

    ^2010-2011 list of events 

    January 2011

    Racial Justice Leadership Institute Skills Training

    The Racial Justice Leadership Institute is designed to foster SU law students' leadership skills for working toward racial justice. This opportunity will offer 40 students dedicated time to focus on recognizing and naming systems of racial privilege and oppression in legal education and the legal profession while building skis to work for racial justice. Due to the nature of the Institute, a commitment to participation for the entirety of the process (all four sessions) is required.

    ^2010-2011 list of events 

    March 2011

    Civil and Criminal Advocacy Strategies for Protecting Civil Rights CLE

    An engaging discussion on police accountability in light of the increasing number of incidents and reports of police misconduct. Sponsored by Seattle University School of Law's Lawyering in a Diverse World Series and the Task Force on Race and the Criminal Justice System.  

    ^2010-2011 list of events 

    April 2011

    Diversity Table Talk

    The small group conversations are facilitated by trained individuals provided by Seattle University's Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    ^2010-2011 list of events 

    2009-2010 Trainings and Workshops

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    September 2009

    Racial Justice Leadership Institute

    Discussion Leader: Dean Spade, Professor of Law, Seattle University School of Law & Jolie Harris, Assistant Director of the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    The Racial Justice Leadership Institute (RJLI) is designed to foster Seattle University School of Law students' leadership skills for working toward racial justice. This opportunity offers 40 students dedicated time to focus on understanding white supremacy, recognizing operations of racial oppression in general and in the legal profession, and building skills to work for racial justice.

    ^2009-2010 List of Events

    October 2009

    Poverty Simulation & CLE

    Presented and facilitated by Fé Lopez, Assistant Director for Student Life and Roxanne Mennes, Director, Continuing Legal Education and Therese Norton, 2L. As part of Social Justice Week, this poverty simulation is a unique interactive workshop where participants role-play what it might be like to live in a typical low-income family trying to survive from month to month. Students gain awareness about the way in which various legal and social service systems come together in the lives of people living in poverty.

    ^2009-2010 List of Events   

    November 2009

    Diversity Table Talk

    The small group conversations are facilitated by trained individuals provided by Seattle University's Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    Table Talk is an informal, facilitated conversation over a meal. Participants discuss whether a personal philosophy of lawyering is needed and how such a philosophy can fill the gap between a lawyer's duty to a client and a lawyer's personal value of taking on the larger issue affecting that client. This is important as students prepare to take on their roles as legal interns/future lawyers. These conversations and personal reflections better prepare students to serve diverse communities.

    ^2009-2010 List of Events   

    January 2010

    Inclusion, Diversity, and Cross-Cultural Competence as a Justice Imperative

    Discussion Leader: Ada Shen-Jaffe, Senior Advisor to the Dean

    Ada Shen-Jaffe facilitates an interactive work session where students learn about and review frameworks that can strengthen their effectiveness as advocates and leaders in an increasingly diverse and global world. Students look at some of the basic building blocks of self-awareness and "EQ" (emotional intelligence), and move on to anti-oppression frameworks relating to status, social rank and power that can help ground students' work as professionals, wherever their career paths take them, in the increasingly important justice imperatives of inclusion, diversity, and cross-cultural competence.

    ^2009-2010 List of Events  

    February 2010

    Diversity Week 
    "The Intersections that Connect Us"
    February 22-February 25, 2010

    Monday, February 22
    Haiti: A Call to Service and the Importance of International Aid
    Anupa Iyer (2L; President, Health Law Society) will moderate a panel of experts from the medical and legal community who will discuss the devastating impact of the earthquake in Haiti and the importance legal and medical aid plays in the efforts to rebuild a country.

    Korematsu Center: New Haven Firefighters Appeal
    Professors Robert Chang and Natasha Martin, along with a law student researcher, will present and discuss the work that the Korematsu Center is doing with the appeal of the New Haven firefighter's discrimination suit.

    Tuesday, February 23
    Invisible People: Those Who Don't Look the Other Way
    Andra Kranzler (2L; Member, BLSA Executive Board) will moderate a panel that will take a panoramic look into the Seattle homeless community and the issues they face.  The panel will discuss the tragedies that have put some homeless individuals on the streets, as well as the hurdles members of the homeless community face when looking for a job. Panelists come from Real Change, Fare Stare, SYLAW, and the Homelessness Speaker Bureau. Also featuring the photography project "Helping Our Brothers Out", the work of a local artist, Bernard Nguyen. 
      
    Gay is NOT the New Black
    Jolie Harris (Assistant Director, Seattle University Office of Multicultural Affairs) takes on the problematic cliché that is makings its way around in Gay is NOT the New Black. The passage of Proposition 8 for gay marriage in California was blamed on people of color who supported Obama but not the marriage initiative. This inflated claim had a heyday in the media, which as a far from objective power structure is known to create conflict. But these messages were taken as factual. Harris will screen her short film and lead a small group discussion after to discuss these issues.

    Attorney General's Office Brownbag: Diversity in Public Service
    Small panel made up attorneys from AGO's office will discuss prepared scenarios illustrating issues relating to diversity that attorneys in public service face on a day-to-day basis.

    Wednesday, February 24 
    Diversity from the Perspective of the Bench
    Seattle University School of Law is honored to host two justices of the Washington State Supreme Court. Chief Justice Barbara Madsen and Associate Chief Justice Charles W. Johnson will discuss the groundbreaking work of the Gender and Justice Commission and the Minority and Justice Commission.  They will also speak about experiences from their own lives that illustrate the importance of being exposed to different viewpoints and cultural perspectives in order to avoid negative biases in litigating and judicial decision making. 

    Examining the Glass Ceiling: Wage Disparities Between Genders
    Myra Downing, Executive Director of the Gender and Justice Commission, will moderate a panel of female attorneys from different age groups and racial backgrounds who will react to recent data on the wage gap. The women will address a series of questions that will reveal the panel's perspective on whether the glass ceiling still exists and how they feel it impacts them in their careers, if at all. Interim Dean Annette Clark will conclude the discussion with insights about how to deal with glass ceiling attitudes in salary negotiations strategies. 
      
    Criminalization of Undocumented People: The Reality of Injustice
    Sandy Restrepo (1L; Community Organizer, El Comite Pro-Reforma Migratoria Y Justicia Social) will moderate a panel that will include various members of the legal community who will discuss the criminalization of undocumented workers. Attorneys will also relay the prejudices undocumented immigrants face and will also describe personal experiences they have faced while working with the injustices faced by immigrants.

    Serving Cultural and Economic Minority Communities
    Elizabeth Hendren, 1L, will moderate a panel discussing the issues that arise in representing diverse communities. Wyking Allah, from the UmojaFest P.E.A.C.E. Center, will speak about his work and what he would like to see in a lawyer from a client's perspective.  Professor O'Neill will speak about her experiences representing Native American tribes and will give an attorney's perspective on representing diverse communities.  Participants will be challenged to think of what respectful and meaningful representation should look like, as well as what we can start doing now as law students to address these issues.
      
    Networking Beyond your Gender and Cultural Identity
    You've heard before that it helps to "be connected" and to "network." But nobody ever tells you how you are supposed to do that. Professor Heidi Bond has no lawyers in her family tree. She can't golf, doesn't watch football, and is allergic to calling people on the phone - especially if she doesn't know them. She nonetheless has a pretty good look at how the mysterious network of connections works. She'll demystify it for you... and explain how you can make your diversity work for you, rather than against you.

    Diversity Week Reception 
    With Remarks from Salvador Mungia, 
    President of the Washington State Bar Association
    In partnership with the Student Bar Association, Seattle University School of Law host the Diversity Week Reception.  This reception will cap off our Annual Diversity Week, which provides opportunities for our law school community to learn and dialogue about important diversity-related issues and to celebrate academic excellence and education for justice achieved through diversity. 

    ^2009-2010 List of Events 

    February 2010

    The Dollars & Sense of Diversity: The Value of Diversity & How to Achieve It

    Presented by Lourdes Fuentes and Mark O'Halloran.

    This CLE will address two questions: "What is the value of diversity?" and "How do you achieve that value?" The sessions is divided into three parts: The business case, recruitment and retention strategies, and making a commitment to diversity.

    Diversity in the law profession is important for many reasons including demands by clients, the diversity of corporate America, the changing demographics of our country, the need for different points of view to solve complex issues in our interconnected world, and the needs of the new generation of law graduates who expect to work in a diverse and vibrant workplace. In addition to providing the framework for a discussion on the value of diversity, this session goes a step further and provides practical information on doing an internal audit, exploring recruitment and retention strategies, and learning the steps for reaching desired results. Participants gain tools to: measure where they are and where they are going; idenfity strategies and approaches that would work in their environment; access the trends in successfully creating a diverse workforce.

    ^2009-2010 List of Events 

    March 2010

    Dealing with Racial/Ethnic Bias in the Courtroom

    Lawyers representing either side in a criminal or civil case can and should seek decisions that are free of racial bias for tactical and ethical reasons. This training will discuss why avoiding racial bias is in the mutual interest of both sides in criminal and civil litigation. This training will also discuss techniques designed to reveal racial bias in potential jurors and promote race-neutral decision-making in the courtoom. 3.0 Ethics CLE Credits.

    Register now: www.regonline.com/Mar0510

    ^2009-2010 List of Events 

    April 2010

    Diversity Table Talk

    The small group conversations are facilitated by trained individuals provided by Seattle University's Office of Multicultural Affairs.

    ^2009-2010 List of Events  

    2008-2009 Trainings and Workshops

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    September 2008

    Inclusion, Diversity, and Cross-Cultural Competence as Justice Imperatives

    Discussion Leader: Ada Shen-Jaffe, Senior Advisor to the Dean, Seattle University School of Law

    In this interactive work session, students learned about and reviewed frameworks to strengthen their effectiveness as advocates and leaders in an increasingly diverse and global world.  They looked at some of the basic building blocks of self-awareness and "EQ" (emotional intelligence), and moved onto anti-oppression frameworks relating to status, social rank and power. 

    ^ 2008-2009 List of Events

    October 2008

    Law Student Diversity Table Talk: Race, Gender, and the Election

    Presented and facilitated by Seattle University Office of Multicultural Affairs.  This was a student-initiated event. 

    Diversity is an important component of who and what we are as a law school; the more we discuss critical issues of race, class, gender, ability and sexual orientation, the better we can continue to advance social justice.

    Table Talks are informal, small group, facilitated conversations over a meal.  Participants were given background reading (short reading) in advance to spark conversation about the intersection of race and gender in political power.

    ^ 2008-2009 List of Events 

    How to Be a Mentee/Creating Useful Networks

    Discussion Leaders: Fe Lopez, Assistant Director for Student Life and Stacey Lara-Kerr, Associate Director of Center for Professional Development. 

    "How to Be a Mentee" is a presentation on the does and dont's of being a good and effective mentee.  Having mentors is extremely important in a law stduent and young attorney's career.  They can provide much needed guidance and can often be an advocate in obtaining and retaining a job.  

    "Creating Useful Networks" is a presentation on how law students can create and maintain networks within the legal community.  This is a presentation on how law students can create and maintain networks within the legal community.  This is an opportunity to find out the diverse variety of legal networks in our community and how to create your own.

    ^ 2008-2009 List of Events 

    November 2008

    The Disability Perspective

    Presented by Andrea Kadlec, David Carlson and Stacie Siebrecht from Disability Rights Washington.

    This training focuses on understanding and advocating for people with disabilities. You will learn about the protection and advocacy system established by the federal government and the services Disability Rights Washington (DRW) provides. After getting an overview of the different types of disabilities, participants will gain an understanding of the importance of using people first language and the disability culture. Participants also will participate in a game to educate individuals as to the important roles people with disabilities have played in our history and the critical developments in the disability civil rights movement. The training also will provide some tips on interviewing individuals with disabilities so as to obtain accurate information from a person with a disability. Finally, participants will learn about how to apply the Rules of Professional Conduct (RPC) to providing services to people with disabilities with a specific focus on RPC 1.14 and 1.6.

    ^ 2008-2009 List of Events 

    January 2009

    Cross Cultural Lawyering

    Discussion Leader: Professor Paul Holland, Director, Seattle University School of Law Ronald A. Peterson Law Clinic

    To be effective in our multicultural society, lawyers must develop the ability to anticipate, identify, and overcome culture-based assumptions, their own and those of the many others with whom they interact (e.g., clients, co-counsel, opposing counsel, judges). This highly interactive session is intended to introduce students to a variety of practices which will improve their ability to avoid the pitfalls of our human tendency to make such assumptions.

    ^ 2008-2009 List of Events 

    February 2009

    Diversity Week
    February 23-February 26. 2009

    Monday, February 23
    ATJI Social Justice Monday
    Interactive workshop using techniques of the Theatre of the Oppressed.  Facilitated by Jaspreet Chowdhary, featuring members of Stage Advocates.

    The Status & Future of Diversity in Times of Economic Downturn: Can the U.S. Afford Diversity?
    Roundtable dialogue with Prof. Delgado & Prof. Stefancic.

    Roundtable Dinner with Members of the Law Review & Seattle Journal for Social Justice

    Tuesday, February 24
    Attorney General's Office - Diversity Luncheon
    Informal luncheon with AAGs: Pedro Bernal, Diane Cartwright, Elijah Forde, Jonathan Mark, Jacqueline Walker, and Maureen Ann Mannix, as moderator.

    Screening for "My Wife"
    David Rothmiller's unique documentary humanizes the struggle for full LGBT marriage equality and getting Washington state to pass equality legislation.  Sponsored by OutLaws and American Constitution Society.

    Wednesday, February 25
    Minority Law Student King County Courthouse Tour & "Discover Law Buddy Day"
    Law students will be paired with youth, observe trials, and attend a networking lunch with members of the bar and bench.

    Student Organizing Tabling Fair
    If you have been waiting for a chance to get involved, the time is now!  Each organization will display/talk about what "diversity" means to them.

    Roundtable Discussion with the Honorable Mary Yu, Ms. Marcine Anderson,, and Ms. Twyla Carter
    An open-ended conversation on their perspectives of the legal experience as multiracial persons of color.  Sponsored by APILSA.

    Thursday, February 26
    What is the Meaning of Diversity Today?
    Are we in a post-racial society now?  With an African-American President, does diversity take on a new meaning?  Are these discussions still relevant?  Roundtable dialogue with Professors Martin and Mahmud.

    The International Perspective: What Is the Meaning of Diversity Today?
    Are we in a post-racial society now?  Dialogue with Professors Slye and Chinen.

    "Minority Voting Rights" CLE with Professor Avila
    Learn how methods of election deny people of color a meaningful opportunity to participate in the political process.  WSBA Young Lawyers Division CLE.  SU Law students may attend at no cost. 

    Diversity Week Reception
    Come celebrate!  Network with alumni and attorneys from the legal community and specialty bar associations.  Keynote speaker: Jeff Robinson of Schroeter Goldmark & Bender.

    ^ 2008-2009 List of Events 

    March 2009

    Safe Spaces

    Discussion Leader: Dr. Manivong J. Ratts, Department of Counseling and School Psychology, Seattle University School of Education

    This training focuses on being an ally to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) community. Basic LGBTQ concepts and theories as well as strategies on how to create an inclusive environment for LGBTQ individuals are explored. Participants will have opportunities to practice ways to address anti-LGBTQ comments and develop skills to address common LGBTQ-related questions. Upon completion of the training, each participant will receive a Safe Space notebook and emblem that can be displayed in one's office. The emblem represents a safe environment that is supportive and affirming of LGBTQ individuals. Note: This training is intended for those who are committed and ready to be allies to the LGBTQ community. It is not meant as a forum for debating LGBTQ issues. This training is sponsored through a grant from the Pride Foundation.

    ^ 2008-2009 List of Events 

    April 2009

    Bias in the Courtroom

    Discussion Leaders: Jeff Robinson, Attorney, Schroeter Goldmark Bender, and Jill Otaki, Assistant U.S. Attorney

    Lawyers representing either side in a criminal or civil case can and should seek decisions that are free of racial bias for tactical and ethical reasons. This training will discuss why avoiding racial bias is in the mutual interest of both sides in criminal and civil litigation. This training will also discuss techniques designed to reveal racial bias in potential jurors and promote race-neutral decision-making in the courtroom.

    ^ 2008-2009 List of Events 

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